PLATINUM2024

Lake County Community Fund

Building a sustainable future for our extraordinary community.

LEADVILLE, CO   |  lakecountycommunityfund.org

Mission

The Lake County Community Fund (LCCF) envisions a Lake County that has an abundance of sustainable philanthropic resources to support a thriving community. In order to arrive at that vision, the LCCF provides a means to expand the capacity of local organizations, promote and facilitate giving opportunities, and inspire investment in Lake County, Colorado.

Ruling year info

2017

Executive Director

Mr. John McMurtry

Main address

PO BOX 477

LEADVILLE, CO 80461 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

81-4684882

NTEE code info

Community Foundations (T31)

Fund Raising and/or Fund Distribution (S12)

Public, Society Benefit - Multipurpose and Other N.E.C. (W99)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Inspiration came when a group of individuals recognized that, to accomplish their collective goals, these historic mining towns needed a more sustainable funding approach. The LCCF Steering Committee formed in August 2014 and began exploring options for building a community fund. As part of this process, the committee chose to form an affiliate fund with the Pikes Peak Community Foundation until its own application for 501(c)(3) nonprofit status could be approved. The LCCF was established as an independent nonprofit in June 2017. A fund by and for the community In the fall of 2015, as part of its planning efforts, the steering committee held two events to seek community input: a question-and-answer session at Colorado Mountain College and an open house at Leadville’s Harperrose Studios. Steering committee members carefully gathered feedback from the events and seated the initial board of directors in February 2016.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Community Grantmaking

Grant making at the LCCF is a competitive and thoughtful process. We undertake a careful assessment of community needs, research existing programs, and identify gaps in services in order to make grants that will provide the most effective support for the Lake County community. We want LCCF grants to provide support for Leadville/Lake County nonprofits’ greatest needs. We also hope that LCCF grants will highlight community buy-in for valuable local endeavors, including efforts that may be in the launch phase and working to get off the ground. The LCCF focuses on funding projects that fit within the following areas:

Arts and Culture
Community and Economic Development
Education and Training
Environmental Initiatives
Health and Wellness

Population(s) Served
Adults

The LCCF's Fiscal Sponsorship Program allows approved nonprofit groups or agencies to partner with the LCCF as a pass-through agent for fundraising when they do not have the capacity to do so on their own.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth
Ethnic and racial groups
Social and economic status

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of meals served or provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People of Latin American descent, Economically disadvantaged people, Immigrants, Cross-border families, Undocumented immigrants

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

By supporting community led programs where participants play an active role in the program itself, we helped to support a fully inclusive food system that adapts to the needs of the community.

Total dollars received in contributions

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, People of Latin American descent, Economically disadvantaged people, At-risk youth, Immigrants

Related Program

Community Grantmaking

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of groups/individuals benefiting from tools/resources/education materials provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People of Latin American descent, Families, Economically disadvantaged people, Immigrants and migrants

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

596 food vouchers valued at $40 each were distributed to Lake County residents needing food assistance.

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The Lake County Community Fund’s mission is to provide a means to expand the capacity of local organizations, promote and facilitate giving opportunities, and inspire investment in Lake County. We envision a Lake County that has an abundance of sustainable philanthropic resources to support a thriving community.

The Lake County Community Fund (LCCF) provides a mechanism to capture funds from outside of Leadville. It provides an avenue for people who may want to donate to the community but who are unfamiliar with area charities. It also provides an easy, one-stop method for donating to a variety of causes within Leadville and Twin Lakes. The fund also can serve as a fiscal agent for entities that are unable to provide tax-deductible receipts to donors.

In addition, the fund will have the resources and nonprofit status to apply for grant opportunities that could bring additional funds to many area nonprofits. In short, the LCCF can gather more funding opportunities for area charities collectively than those charities could secure alone.

Writing grant applications is time consuming. Applying to a smaller fund may be a better choice for some nonprofits, as a community fund may not require a lengthy application or may be more flexible on timing and budget. This approach enables the nonprofit to spend its limited time on serving its clients while at the same time gaining a better chance of securing funds.

The fund is intended to help achieve shared community goals. Often, multiple nonprofits work together on a collective goal, such as homelessness, and joint funding requests are often accepted. We do encourage collaboration and plan to award grants to programs that increase the capabilities and capacity of other local nonprofit organizations. Read about our grant-making process.

The Lake County Community Fund does not compete with other community organizations. Instead, we seek to create a more efficient way for donors to make a gift, grant, or contribution to a variety of causes in Lake County and to inspire donors to invest in Lake County.

The fund is set up by locals, a group of community members who saw the need for financial help for nonprofits that are doing good to help the community. People on the board care about the community and about bringing in more resources to develop it. Meet our board members.

During the past year, we have been inspired by the resilience and caring of our Lake County community. The COVID-19 pandemic brought into focus how much we all depend upon one another to act for the greater common good. The response has been truly special.

We are most grateful for the leadership from our Board of Directors, and the outpouring of support from our donors and institutional friends during these difficult months.

Seventy percent of Lake Countys workforce commute to Eagle and Summit counties for resort, healthcare and service industry jobs, sustaining this internationally renowned economic engine. When these industries were shut down March 14, 2020, thousands of our Lake County workers lost jobs and income. Many did not know how they would pay their bills or provide food for their families.

Within hours of the stoppage, our Board activated the Disaster Relief Fund, and the Unmet Needs Committee was created. Since April 2020, individual contributions combined with Colorado nonprofit and government support have distributed more than $663,842 for COVID-19 Relief in Lake County. This critical resource has provided rent and utility assistance for 721 households representing 2,502 individuals.

Lake County residents stepped up without hesitation making contributions, which in some cases included donating stimulus checks. We are most grateful for support from the Freeport-McMoran Foundation, Climax Molybdenum, Eagle Valley Community Fund, the Vail Valley Foundation, Copper Mountain Resort, POWDR, and the Summit Foundation.

Of all the central Rocky Mountain communities in Colorado, Lake County is the most vulnerable, with the greatest number of children and youth facing the most difficult circumstances. The percentage of Lake County High School students on free and reduced lunch assistance (74.8%) is significantly higher than the state average of 36.7%. This indicates that the area has a higher level of poverty than the state average.

Despite these challenges, you will see as you read in this Report that we are making strides. From 2017 to 2022, our Board has awarded 118 grants totaling more than $369,000 in grants to local community nonprofit organizations.

As we look forward to 2024 and beyond, we have to remind ourselves of our extraordinary history. Since the 1870s, tremendous wealth has been extracted from Lake County. But Leadvilleonce the second most populous city in Coloradoand Lake County, continue to face significant challenges. Our goal is to build an endowment so that we can sustain local programs in perpetuity and break the boom and bust cycle. In order to provide this support long-term, we need your help.

Financials

Lake County Community Fund
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Lake County Community Fund

Board of directors
as of 01/16/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Melissa Kendrick

Kayla Marcella

Lake County Commissioner

Nell Wareham

Climax Molybdenum Company

Mayor Greg Labbe

Mayor, City of Leadville

Hon. Jonathan Shamis

Colorado 5th Judicial District

Kelly Sweeney, Esq.

Retired Attorney

Melissa Kendrick

Kendrick Consulting

Brian Turner

SolVista

Gloria Perez

Lake County

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 1/16/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 02/05/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.