Babies of Homelessness

No waitlist. No referral process. The child's needs are top priority.

Mission

Babies of Homelessness is a member of the National Diaper Bank Network and is helping families with children and agencies with a reliable and ongoing source for diapers and necessities. Within five years of existence, we have helped 4,500 families with children ages 0 to 8 in underserved King and Snohomish counties. This year we are on track to distribute 350,000 diapers, four times more than the previous year. We continue to expand our reach and aim to allocate 25% more diapers by the end of next year.

Ruling year info

2017

Executive Director

Brittan Stockert

Main address

PO Box 147

Bothell, WA 98041 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

81-4902417

NTEE code info

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Diaper need is an overlooked and invisible problem. One in three families struggles to afford enough diapers to keep a baby or toddler clean, dry, and healthy. Families need twice as much income as the federal poverty line’s estimate of what it takes to make ends meet to provide basic needs. Yet, no funded public program covers diapers — not WIC or SNAP or cash assistance. And even as millions of low-income families are slipping into poverty during Covid, we know the need increases as families are hit with diaper price spikes. Without clean diapers: Babies are exposed to potential health risks and toxic stress; mothers are at risk for increased maternal depression; parents cannot access child care, which requires a daily supply of diapers; parents miss work or school and cannot attain long-term personal and professional goals reinforcing cycles of poverty and homelessness.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Outreach

We understand each family and agency's ability to access diapers and basics varies. Our diaper bank program is unique from most other diaper bank programs because we offer not one but three ways for families and agencies to receive diapers and necessities.

Direct Service: Families experiencing homelessness can call our intake line and order diapers, wipes and formula. We deliver directly a 30-day supply of diapers and wipes and formula to the family in a shelter, car park, RV, motel, encampment, or couch-surfing within 72 hours.

Partner Network: 20 select agencies receive a bulk order of diapers (in requested sizes), wipes and formula from us every month; agencies located in South King and Snohomish counties where very few if any resources for ongoing diaper support exist.

Pickup Service: Twice a month, families in need of diapers can meet at a bus accessible location and receive a 30-day supply of diapers.

Population(s) Served
Families
Homeless people
Low-income people
Children and youth

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of organizational partners

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of volunteers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of families served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children, Families, Extremely poor people, Homeless people, Low-income people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

As a result of receiving diapers, families will report positive health, social, and economic outcomes. Families will report positive changes in parental mood; improved child health and happiness; increased opportunities for childcare, work, and school attendance; and the ability to divert household finances toward other basic needs, including utilities and medical care.

We understand each family and agency's ability to access diapers and basics varies. Our model of three distribution channels allows us to serve the most vulnerable families and under-resourced agencies in South King and Snohomish Counties—specifically, BIPOC, Latinx and rural communities where little to no ongoing support for diapers exists.

Babies of Homelessness operates under the thoughtful guidance and direction of a volunteer Board of Directors, a staff of 3 full-time employees and volunteers.

We measure impact using a Salesforce key performance indicators (KPI) dashboard. Some of the programmatic metrics we record include the number of diapers distributed, number of children and families served based on zip code or agency, number of intake calls, volunteer hours, and more. Twice a year, we also collect qualitative information such as testimonials via surveys and interviews. We will do an internal assessment with our staff and hire outside expertise to conduct our evaluation. We will designate 5 to 10 percent of our total project budget for evaluation.

5500 families with children served
385591 diaper distributed
20 monthly South King and Snohomish county partners received a bulk supply of diapers, wipes and formula

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Families experiencing homelessness, on the brink of homelessness and/or in need with children ages 0 to 8 years of age.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    SMS text surveys, Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time, It is hard to come up with good questions to ask people, It is difficult to get honest feedback from the people we serve, It is difficult to identify actionable feedback,

Financials

Babies of Homelessness
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Babies of Homelessness

Board of directors
as of 10/8/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Angela Harmon

Babies of Homelessness

Star Lalario

Sotheby's

Timmy Woods

Microsoft

Emily O'Hara

Technoserve

David Wilson

Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation

Deanna Powell

Fidelity

Cindy Kitts

Retired, REI

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 09/15/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data