Anthropocene Alliance

Frontline communities fighting for climate and environmental justice.

Mission

Anthropocene Alliance is the nation’s largest coalition of frontline communities fighting for climate and environmental justice. The more than 1,000,000 people we represent face a myriad of challenges, including destroyed or damaged property, homelessness, rising debt, unaffordable insurance, physical illness and emotional stress. Supported by outstanding partner organizations that contribute expertise -- hydrologists, health advocates, engineers, planners, and lawyers – our grassroots leaders have successfully halted developments in flood prone areas; planned and instituted green infrastructure; organized home buyouts; and promoted clean-ups at superfund sites, toxic landfills, and petrochemical plants in areas that flood.

Ruling year info

2017

Executive Director

Ms Harriet Festing

Main address

105 NE Bay Avenue

Micanopy, FL 32667 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

81-5166043

NTEE code info

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (M01)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

A2 was formed in 2017 as the impact of global warming became increasingly manifest across the country. In addition, the systemic racism that left Black and brown communities especially vulnerable to environmental devastation was increasingly exposed. That’s why we undertook to focus our efforts on grassroots, community leaders. We committed to helping them obtain the technical, legal, and financial support they needed to set the agenda for progressive, environmental change. Our climate justice leaders come from towns and neighborhoods across the country impacted by un-natural disasters arising from climate change, unregulated development, historic patterns of infrastructure dis-investment and gentrification. They face multiple challenges, including damaged property, homelessness, crippling debt, unaffordable insurance, and compromised health.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Vision / Action

Vision/Action 2025 is directing more than $60 million of federal, state and foundation support to 30, low-income, Black, Latinx, and Native American communities to buttress climate change resilience. Our initiative is also intended to highlight the need to change federal, state and municipal programs to make them more equitable and effective.

Population(s) Served
Alaskan Natives
American Indians
Multiracial people
People of African descent
People of Latin American descent

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Dollars ($K) committed to A2 members for climate resilience directly as a result of our work.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Ethnic and racial groups, Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

With a focus on green infrastructure investments and property buyouts. Assumes zero dollars before Aa launch in 2017. The figure is cumulative.

Number of members of A2

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Ethnic and racial groups, Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Assumes zero before the launch of A2 in 2017.

Number of A2 members that represent low-income and/or communities of color.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Ethnic and racial groups, Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Assumes zero before the launch of A2 in April 2017.

Number of A2 members matched to pro bono expertise (e.g. scientists and attorneys)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Ethnic and racial groups, Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Assumes zero before the launch of A2 in 2017. We have leveraged more than half a million dollars of pro bono expertise for our work thus far.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our members are the survivors of Hurricanes Harvey, Florence, Laura, Sally, Sandy, Matthew, Irma, Delta and Zeta, flooding in the Midwest (2015-2019), and urban inundation that worsens every year.

Linked by collective understanding, research and moral force, these frontline leaders are bringing national visibility to the struggle for climate justice. With our support, they have halted developments on wetlands and forests; implemented green infrastructure programs; organized home buyouts; engaged in legal protest, and promoted clean-ups at superfund sites, toxic landfills, and petrochemical plants in areas that flood.

We achieve our mission by:

1. Building coalitions of grassroots groups ignored by most environmental organizations..

2. Engaging the people most vulnerable to environmental harm: the poor, the sick, and the elderly, and communities subjected to racism. We give them the tools they need to confront corporate and political special interests.

5. Keeping our own staff small, adroit, and creative. Though we aim to grow, we will continue to leverage our resources by working with other nonprofits and community leaders. We are also building a diverse and sustainable financial base through foundation funding, individual giving, member donations, sponsorships and merchandise sales.

Anthropocene Alliance was launched by the British environmentalist Harriet Festing who has 25 years' experience managing award winning food and sustainability programs within government, non-profit and academic sectors in the U.S. and U.K., and the American professor Stephen F. Eisenman, a widely known writer, critic, curator and activist who has campaigned against U.S. sanctioned torture, long-term solitary confinement, animal abuse and environmental damage. A2’s staff and Board of Directors includes distinguished scholars, organizers, activists, scientists, engineers, artists and designers.

In the four years since our founding, we’ve grown to more than 100 members, three quarters of which are priority communities. 78% are led by women.

Thirty-eight communities have been matched with pro bono scientists and lawyers. The value of that support is now more than a million dollars.

This year, nineteen of our grassroots leaders met with their members of congress; many have attended multiple meetings (we’ve organized 42 meetings in total.)

We’ve helped raise funds for 47% of our members — including $13 million for Rosewood Strong (Horry County, SC) to pay for the buy-out 60 flooded homes.

Six A2 communities and their cities have been matched with U.S. Army Corps Silver Jacket engineers to receive floodplain management assistance. Four more have been matched with planners and engineers from the National College Sea Grant program.

In the last few months, we’ve helped seven of our community leaders draft proposals to the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation’s National Coastal Resilience program, and Five Stars and Urban Water program. The grant applications range from $50,000 to 250,000. (We are optimistic, but keep your fingers crossed.)

And we are still growing! We expect to have more than 200 grassroots leaders by 2024.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Yes, we serve our members, who we work with closely.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Community meetings/Town halls, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees, other,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We launched the A2 Council, which consists of eight of our leaders who will help advise and steer our work.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

Anthropocene Alliance
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Anthropocene Alliance

Board of directors
as of 8/3/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Joyce Coffee

Climate Resilience Consulting

Term: 2021 - 2024

Joyce Coffee

Climate Resilience Consulting

Dr. Eric Tate

University of Iowa

Dr Stephen Eisenman

Northwestern University

Harriet Festing

Anthropocene Alliance

Burrell Poe

Goldin Institute

Rajul (Raj) Pandya

American Geophysical Union

Aidil Oscariz

Catalyst Miami

Peter Mierwinski

Dr Paul Jaskot

Duke University

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 07/27/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person with a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 07/27/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.