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IDAHO HUMANE SOCIETY INC

aka I.H.S.   |   Boise, ID   |  www.idahohumanesociety.org

Mission

The Idaho Humane Society's mission is to advocate the welfare and responsible care of animals, protect them from neglect and cruelty, and promote humane awareness and compassion.

Ruling year info

1955

President & CEO

Dr. Jeff Rosenthal

Main address

1300 S. Bird Street

Boise, ID 83709 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

82-0212536

NTEE code info

Animal Protection and Welfare (includes Humane Societies and SPCAs) (D20)

Veterinary Services (D40)

Animal Training, Behavior (D61)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

IHS advocates for the welfare and responsible care of animals, protecting them from neglect and cruelty, and promoting humane education, awareness, and compassion. We believe that because domestic animals are a product of human intervention, we have a special obligation to them in regard to humane treatment and responsible stewardship.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Sheltering and Adoptions

Sheltering & Adoptions - A primary goal of the Idaho Humane Society is to provide housing and care while finding loving and caring homes for the thousands of animals that come through our doors each year. Employees and volunteers work tirelessly to match homeless animals with responsible people seeking loving animal companions. Each animal’s behavior and general health is evaluated before being offered for adoption; helpful notes about the animal’s behavior and personality are provided for prospective families. Additionally, our SPOT mobile program transports animals to highly visible locations to reach potential adopters. We also partner with animal-related stores creating satellite adoption centers for cats. Adoption fees include examination by veterinarian, initial vaccinations, mandatory spaying or neutering, and microchip identification. Dog training classes are offered at a discount to anyone who adopts a dog from the shelter. Our adoption success rates are some of the nation's highest. In 2010, 6,951 animals found new homes through our adoption service.

 

Transfer Program - In 2010, 551 animals were transferred in for adoption from other shelters.

Lost & Found - We reunited 1,660 lost pets with their owners in 2010.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Animal Care and Control – Deputized officers investigate abuse and neglect cases, rescue stray and injured animals, respond to citizen concerns, educate the public about responsible pet ownership and enforce city, county and state animal ordinances. Officers are on the road seven days a week and are available for after-hours emergencies. Our Animal Care and Control division investigated 1,109 reports of cruelty, neglect and abandonment and completed 9,215 field service calls in 2010.

 

Court Intervention Program – As a proactive effort to curb animal cruelty and neglect and animal attacks on children, the Idaho Humane Society Animal Care and Control division provides a Humane Animal Care class for first-time offenders under animal-related ordinances or statutes. The class, part of a court-ordered sentence, teaches attendees the proper care of domestic animals.

Investigations and Rescue – I.H.S. responds to cruelty and neglect situations in the State of Idaho to rescue and rehabilitate the animals and pursues prosecution of the responsible party. I.H.S. assists law enforcement in outlying jurisdictions upon request.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Inmate Trained Shelter Dogs – Behavior problems (perceived or real) are the number one reason adult dogs are relinquished to our shelter. Our Inmate Dog Alliance Project of Idaho (IDAPI) successfully transforms behaviorally-challenged dogs into wonderful, trained family companions. IDAPI is a community partnership of the Idaho Humane Society, Idaho Correctional Center, and the Idaho State Correctional Institutions. IDAPI is a highly successful and beneficial program which places dogs from the Idaho Humane Society temporarily in cell blocks of Idaho correctional facilities for intensive socialization and training by inmates. Inmate participants are carefully screened for acceptance into the program and the program promotes social interaction, cooperation, morale, and helps diminish the institutional stress level. IDAPI cell blocks are the "best behaved" cell blocks in the Idaho corrections system. 162 dogs from the shelter graduated from the program in 2010.

Rescue Ranch – The Idaho Humane Society does not restrict its advocacy and rescue efforts to just dogs and cats. Farmyard domestic animals are sometimes the victims of abuse and neglect and for that reason the Idaho Humane Society operates the Rescue Ranch. Rescue Ranch staff and volunteers have conducted the largest farm animal rescues (horses and cows) in Idaho history. In 2010, 14 horses and 21 other barnyard animals were cared for at the Ranch.

Pet Food Donation Program – Assisted pets of home-bound owners by delivering over 22,000 pounds of pet food to 160 companion animals through the monthly Meals on Wheels program. Helped financially struggling families by supplying 48,000 pounds of pet food through our Pet Food Pantry to keep pets in their homes. And provided hay, equine senior feed, and grain to owners of livestock animals experiencing economic hardshiclubs, and other interested groups. Presentations can vary on topics from pet safety to the variety of programs centered on animal care and protection.

Idaho Humane Society Website – Provides real time information about animals available for adoption, events, veterinary services, donation opportunities and more at www.idahohumanesociety.org(http://www.idahohumanesociety.org/) . Our kitty colony is featured on our website and has interactive, real time toys that people can move over the internet to play with our available for adoption cats. In 2010, our website received over 500,000 visits from people all over the world.

 Volunteer Services – Volunteers are indispensible in assisting with mobile adoption units, care of shelter animals, adoption counseling, fundraising events, and much more. 19,138 volunteer hours were donated in 2010.

Foster Care Program – This wonderful program gives animals recovering from injuries or illness and those too young to adopt, caring homes until they are placed permanently. In 2010, 2,172 animals were placed in foster homes until being adopted into a forever home.

Pets for Seniors Program – Funded by generous grantors, this program supports low or no-fee adoptions of adult animals by senior citizens who would otherwise be unable to enjoy pet companionshi000 of discounted veterinary services.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Full-Service Veterinary Medical Center – Open seven days a week and staffed by Doctors of Veterinary Medicine and professional staff. The Center offers both regular and emergency medical services to the entire community, as well as providing medical care for all animals housed at the shelter. The hospital allows the shelter to save and adopt out hundreds of ill or injured animals that shelters without veterinary care would be forced to euthanize, while providing mandatory spay and neuter services for all animals adopted from the I.H.S. shelter. The Medical Center proudly received accreditation by the American Animal Hospital Association (AAHA) in 2010. The Veterinary Medical Center serves over 25,000 animals each year and performed 10,623 spay/neuter surgeries in 2010.

Low-Priced Services – In addition to regular veterinary services for public animals, we offer special programs to help pets of low-income families receive quality medical care and spay/neuter surgeries.

 

SPOT Mobile Unit – Our mobile spay/neuter clinic delivered 560 needed spay/neuter and vaccination services to animals in underserved areas of our community.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Awards

Medical Center Accreditation 2010

American Animal Hospital Association

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of animal adoptions

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Sheltering and Adoptions

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of animals rescued

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Sheltering and Adoptions

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of animals spayed and neutered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Veterinary Medical Care

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of sheltered animals

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Other - describing something else

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

All intake of domestic animals and wildlife.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The Idaho Humane Society is the largest and oldest animal welfare organization and veterinary charity in the state. We are a private 501(c)3 organization that relies on donations to provide programs and services that benefit animals in Idaho. IHS advocates for the welfare and responsible care of animals, protecting them from neglect and cruelty, and promoting humane education, awareness, and compassion. We believe that because domestic animals are a product of human intervention, we have a special obligation to them in regard to humane treatment and responsible stewardship.

High Volume, Low-Cost Sterilization of Pets
Collaboration with Rescue Groups:
Foster Care
Comprehensive Adoption Programs
Pet Retention Programs
Medical Programs
Public Relations/Community Involvement
Volunteers
Proactive Redemptions
Compassionate Leadership and Staffing

The Idaho Humane Society will continue to grow and meet the demand to shelter, feed, provide medical attention to, and find adoptive homes for abandoned and abused animals in our community; to educate Idahoans about the proper care of their own pets; to prevent animal overpopulation; and to promote kindness to animals. We envision a humane Idaho in which healthy and adoptable animals are no longer euthanized, and both domestic animals and wildlife are treated with compassion and respect.

The Idaho Humane Society’s new Overland Road animal care center is a 42,000 square-foot facility that opened in November 2019. It includes an adoption center, a humane education center, and a veterinary medical center.

The project addressed problems the Idaho Humane Society faced in its former Dorman Street location, which was built two decades ago under now-antiquated animal sheltering standards to accommodate pets only for short-term stays. The new facility improves living conditions for animals sheltered by IHS, by providing larger home-like enclosures that will keep shelter pets calm and healthy. Windows now bring sunlight to animal housing areas, and both dogs and cats have access to the outdoors. Such habitat enrichment is especially important because an increasing amount of the Idaho Humane Society’s work involves providing training, socialization, and medical care to animals that aren’t immediately “adoptable” when they arrive at the shelter.

The new facility addressed another pressing need for the Idaho Humane Society by increasing surgery, treatment and recovery areas that provide high-quality, comprehensive medical care to homeless animals, injured strays awaiting reunification with their owners, and pets belonging to low-income qualified clients who have nowhere else to turn. It also expanded the organization’s ability to train the next generation of caregivers through a partnership with Washington State University’s College of Veterinary Medicine.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

Financials

IDAHO HUMANE SOCIETY INC
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

IDAHO HUMANE SOCIETY INC

Board of directors
as of 01/26/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Susan Allison

Pat Jones

Jaren Wieland

Matisse Weigel

Joy Bohn

Lindsay Andrysiak

Matt Moirshita

Jenny Weaver

Lisa Uhlmann

Susan Allison

Linda Payne Smith

Hailee Elledge

Cody Gough

Bill Page

Debbie Phillips

Tara Martens Miller

Dawn Snapp Leasure

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Not applicable

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 1/26/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

Transgender Identity

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data