Pet Resource Center of Kansas City (Formerly Spay and Neuter KC)

Keeping pets and people together

aka Pet Resource Center of Kansas City   |   Kansas City, MO   |  www.prckc.org

Mission

Our mission is to decrease pet homelessness, increase pet retention and improve the quality of life for pets through education and supportive services for families in need.

Notes from the nonprofit

How we do what we do is important and a part of our lives every day. It's what has excelled us to be top rated animal resource program in Kansas City serving over 25,000 pets a year. Our commitment to the community begins with our commitment to each other. These core values reflect that dedication to one another, our service to pets and people, and passion for our mission. Be Helpful. We are driven by a desire to help and create positive outcomes for all pets by providing non-judgmental support and collaborating with other organizations. Build Trust. Our organization is committed to being a safe and trusted resource for our community to ensure that no one is denied the love of an animal due to limited resources. Be Compassionate. Our positive and supportive environment is a reflection of how we care for the wellbeing of pets and people, as well as each other. We are dedicated to making a difference in every community we serve, every day.

Ruling year info

2003

Principal Officer

Mrs. Michelle Dormady Rivera

Main address

PO Box 410303

Kansas City, MO 64141 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Spay and Neuter Kansas City

EIN

82-0563117

NTEE code info

Veterinary Services (D40)

Animal Protection and Welfare (includes Humane Societies and SPCAs) (D20)

Disaster Preparedness and Relief Services (M20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

We have already spayed and neutered over 150,000 pets and have reduced the surplus of pets. However there is still more work to be done in continued reduction of unwanted pets. Our focus is now on providing an adequate level of resources to our community to keep pets out of shelters, deter animal control calls, keep pets healthy and in homes with the owners who love them. We have recently gone through a rebrand and changed our name to Pet Resource Center of Kansas City. We are serving over 25,000 pets a year to help keep them healthy and out of our area shelters.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Low Cost Spay and Neuter Services

Our primary focus is to promote spay and neutering as a means to decrease pet homelessness. We do this by targeting animals that are at high-risk of entering the shelter system and providing their spay and neuter services at low-cost or free. Our clinic performs over 10,000 spay and neuter surgeries every year.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Homeless people

The Pet Resource Center travels to various parts of the city and surrounding areas to provide accessible and affordable routine wellness veterinary care. Community clinics are held twice a month and are targeted to those who could not otherwise afford these services. These clinics are a great way for us to educate pet owners and reach the under-served and under-resourced areas of our community.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Homeless people

The Pet Resource Center believes the key to changing our community is through education. Our Community Engagement and Resource team canvasses problem areas of the city in a door-to-door education campaign. Our Program Volunteers talk to pet owners about the importance of spay neuter and needed resources their pet may need. We focus on pet owners (those that would most likely never call us) and provide free or affordable spay and neuter. Most of the pets we assist through this program live in less than desirable conditions. We provide needy pets with new dog houses, hay, food, toys and whatever other necessary supplies the pet owner may need to help improve the quality of life for these pets.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Homeless people

The Pet Resource Center of Kansas City provides preventative veterinary care and other services to pet owners who may not otherwise afford such services from a regular veterinarian. A large percentage of the pets that visit this clinic have never seen a veterinarian and are in desperate need of parasite control. This service simply provides the pet a better quality of life and helps educate pet owners on the importance of routine veterinary care for their pets. In total over 13,000 pets visit this clinic each year.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Homeless people

The Pet Resource Center offers a special medical assistance program to provide funding to pet owners who cannot afford emergency care or specialized medical care for their pets. This program helps prevent the unnecessary relinquishment of pets to the shelter or the unnecessary euthanasia of pets due to financial limitations.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Homeless people

The Pet Resource Center provides pet food to struggling families for their pets as well as food support to local rescue groups and shelters. Over 20 tons of food was distributed in 2019 and so far to date in 2020 (due to Covid) over 50 tons of food has been given out.

Population(s) Served
Unemployed people
Economically disadvantaged people

Where we work

Awards

Rescue Partner for Joplin MO Tornado Assistance 2011

ASPCA

Philly Award 2019

Non Profit Connect

Philly Award 2020

Non Profit Connect

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of animals spayed and neutered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Low Cost Spay and Neuter Services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Total number of owned pets spayed or neutered for low cost or for free. Numbers in 2020 declined due to temporary suspension of services in 2020 from COVID.

Number of animals vaccinated

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Wellness Care Clinic - WCC

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of dogs, cats, puppies and kittens vaccinated against rabies.

Number of pets microchipped

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Wellness Care Clinic - WCC

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of pets who were microchipped in our community.

Total pounds of pet food and litter distributed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Unemployed people, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Community Engagement and Resources

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

As the metro's first pet outreach program, we know the impact that being out in the community makes. With folks out of work and struggling, we were inundated with calls for help with food.

Number of veterinary field clinics held

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Unemployed people, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Community Engagement and Resources

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Community clinics include, off site clinics at community centers, mobile services, drive up clinics.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our ultimate goal is to keep "owned" pets out of shelters which will allow shelters to house and care for animals in true need (abused and neglected pets) A major factor behind pet homelessness is poverty and the lack of resources available to lower income pet owners. Education is key to making generational impacts in how our community cares for pets. Nearly 85% of the pet owners we serve have taken their pets in off the street. Over 90% consider their pets a part of their family. However most cannot afford basic veterinary care for their pets. We can't stop low income people from owning pets, nor should we. The animal-human bond has many benefits. These pet owners simply need access to the resources to ensure their pets live a happy and healthy life. Those resources include vaccinations; spay neuter, education, pet food pantry and other basic pet supplies. By providing these resources and education we can deter animal control calls, reduce pet relinquishment and keep pets in their homes with the owners who love them. We know we have succeeded by lowering the number of ""local"" impounds or animal control calls within our current shelter system.

Our strategies are what have made us most successful so far to date and include building personal relationships with pet owners in our community, working with a compassionate and non-judgement attitude towards these pet owners. It also includes not waiting on pet owners to call us, we go to them. Our team members go into the areas of Kansas City where there is a higher rate of animal control calls. We provide education; basic resources and ability to schedule spay neuter surgeries and vaccinations for the pets in these areas.

With the impacts of COVID we have seen an increase in demand of services and to help meet those demands we have revamped the way we serve our community. It is our goal to make sure we reach all those in need and do so by:

*Having a very efficient and safe process to serve pets and clients at our clinic
*Set up off site drive through locations
*Have added mobile services to go curb side to those at highest risk of contracting COVID, have transportation issues, disabled and financial struggles.

We are empathetic and compassionate towards our pet owning community no matter the size of their wallet. In the animal welfare field, it is not uncommon to hear, ""If you cannot afford a pet you shouldn't have one."" We feel the opposite. Knowing that 85% of the people we serve have taken their pets off the street, that tells us they most certainly care. Also knowing that 90% of them consider their pets a part of their family shows the incredible power of the animal-human bond. Our approach with the pet owners in our community is nonjudgmental and with a dedication to simply help improve that pets quality of life through basic resources and education. We provide our clients the best customer service and teach about the value of our services and the benefits of those services to the pet's health and to our community. We also inform pet owners that while no one is turned away for their inability to pay, what they do pay towards their services ensures we are able to continue to help other pets in need. This then in turn puts value into the pet which then increases pet retention. Our Leadership Team has strong visionary skills and are strategically looking ahead decades down the road. While we know the numbers of animals needing to be spayed or neuter will likely continue to decline (due to mass sterilization of community pets) poverty will not likely change drastically. Pet owners will always need access to resources and education to help provide their pet a long and healthy life.

In 2002, nearly 20,000 pets were being killed in our area shelters for space and due to a lack of progressive and innovative adoption programs. Killing was status quo back then, but things have changed. With over 100,000 spays and neuters performed in our program, and better sheltering and adoption programs that number has dropped below 3,000 annually and community wide. We have not been able to make a dent in the feral cat population where it is estimated over a half a million feral and community cats roam the streets in Greater Kansas City. We don't know if we will ever get control of that number, but the several thousand being Trapped Neutered and Returned are doing some prevention. Our hopes are to have over 70 local veterinarian clinics participate in a city wide TNR program where possibly 10,000 or more feral cats are sterilized.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    We serve lower income pet owners. People who love their pets but have financial struggles. Our mission is to help all pet owners by providing resources to help them keep their pets in their homes.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    SMS text surveys, Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Any negative reviews are discussed and, if needed, a policy change will be implemented. We have had a few in this last year and example would be that a pet escaped from a car as the owner was handing it over to a staff person. We now ensure a leash is on a pet before transferring to any staff or volunteers.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    It helps us to better understand the resources needed, what challenges our community faces as well as need of services to our targeted clients. Also accessibility and affordability of services.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

Pet Resource Center of Kansas City (Formerly Spay and Neuter KC)
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Pet Resource Center of Kansas City (Formerly Spay and Neuter KC)

Board of directors
as of 7/28/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mike Black

Michelle Rivera

CEO

Pat Pheffer

Director of Personnel

Bryan Reed

DVM

Mike Black

SEOMike

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 01/29/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 07/28/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.