HART for Animals, Inc.

Our mission is to save animal lives. Our hope is that one day we won't have to...

aka HART for Animals includes the Bredel Veterinary Clinic, the Bed 'n Bark Inn, MuttWorks, Pick of the Litter (thrift shop), and the Adoption Wing   |   McHenry, MD   |  www.hartforanimals.org

Mission

HART's mission is to improve the condition of animals in Western Maryland by: 1. Rescuing and sheltering adoptable animals at the HART Animal Center until permanent homes are found for them. 2. Decreasing animal overpopulation through spay/neuter surgeries of homeless cats and dogs before adoption, and owned pets of low-income residents. 3. Employing an animal adoption process that ensures suitable homes and commits adopting families to return the animal(s) to HART if their circumstances change. 4. Rescuing homeless animals and transporting them to larger rescue groups. 5. Encourage community involvement through the participation and training of over 200 volunteers. 6. Assisting low-income pet owners to pay for extraordinary veterinary care.

Notes from the nonprofit

Starting a business with a workable business plan, solid experience, and sufficient capital to overcome startup challenges is extremely difficult. Starting a non-profit because the founders are passionate about a cause is beyond difficult. Success requires not only passion but skill in marketing, fundraising, business management, state regulations, labor law, insurance... and a single-minded dedication to changing the world. That's what HART did... That's what HART is.

Ruling year info

2003

Executive Director

Ms Paula Yudelevit

Main address

P.O. Box 623

McHenry, MD 21541-0623 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

H A R T of Garrett County, Inc.

EIN

82-0584608

NTEE code info

Animal Protection and Welfare (includes Humane Societies and SPCAs) (D20)

Animal Protection and Welfare (includes Humane Societies and SPCAs) (D20)

Animal Protection and Welfare (includes Humane Societies and SPCAs) (D20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2019, 2018 and 2017.
Register now

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

HART was founded in response to a specific problem: to stop the euthanasia of healthy animals at the county shelter, due to lack of space and financial resources. HART began by rescuing the shelter's animals and transporting them to other rescues or shelters where they could be adopted. When it became clear that transports alone would not solve the problem, HART launched a fundraising campaign to build its own animal adoption center and provide a unique facility where animals would never have to be euthanized for lack of space or resources. The HART Center opened in 2016 and has become an important resource to the community and to the animals we save every day. The HART Center has become a place where people can visit, take their sick animals, board their pets in the knowledge that they would be well-cared for, and adopt new pets. We are saving the lives of close to 1,000 animals a year and created almost 40 new jobs in a community that greatly needed them!

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Animal Rescue and Transport

HART was founded on the basis of Animal Rescue and Transport. Between 2003 and 2019, HART worked closely with the county shelter to evaluate their animals at intake in order to transport them to larger rescue groups for adoption. In 2017, the Maryland General Assembly passed HB 626- Animal Shelter Standards of Care and Protocol Implementation and Enforcement, which required the department to develop standards of care for dogs and cats kept in county shelters. The law was implemented in July 2019, and it greatly improved the condition of our local shelter. However, we still work with them to save as many animal lives as possible, either by transporting them to other shelters or by bringing them to the HART Center where they will have a greater chance of being adopted.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Economically disadvantaged people

HART has two spay/neuter programs to serve low-income pet owners: HARThelp, which provides low-cost surgeries, and Lifesaver, a no-cost program funded by the Maryland Department of Agriculture.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

As part of HART's effort to save animal lives, it expanded its community programs to provide veterinary services to pets owned by our low-income residents. Neil's Fund was created, thanks to a grant from the Banfield Foundation, to provide assistance to pet owners faced with extraordinary veterinary expenses (for example, leg amputations, eye removals, etc.) for their animals. Funds for Neil's Fund are raised through donations, grants, and special events.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Economically disadvantaged people

Following a fundraising campaign that began in 2006, HART was able to complete the first phase of the HART Animal Center in 2014, which contains three revenue centers designed to help support the operational costs of the entire facility. In 2016, HART opened the largest section of the Center - the Adoption Wing. This section has a 120 animal capacity and is located in the section of Garrett County that is heavily visited in the summer by tourists to the Deep Creek Lake resort area. The revenue centers are: the Bredel Veterinary Clinic, the Bed 'n Bark Inn, and MuttWorks Grooming. The Adoption Wing depends on donations and grants to pay for all its charitable programs.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Many rescued animals arrive at the HART Center with serious or life-threatening conditions: broken bones, bullet wounds, parvovirus, poisoning, or suffering the physical and psychological effects of long-term abuse and neglect. Healing these cats and dogs takes time, hard work, dedication, and funding.

Mocha was a female mixed-breed puppy that was relinquished to the shelter by her owner. Her sweet temperament made her the shelter's mascot until her death in January 2014. The HART staff decided to memorialize sweet old Mocha with a fund in her honor to help animals that have nobody to help them.

Mocha’s Fund is financed through grants and individual donations. These funds are used for major veterinary expenses incurred by animals rescued by HART, such as amputating a leg, treating sarcoptic mange, removing an eye, and others.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Lola's Senior Dog Fund was created in 2019 at the request of a HART Board member, in memory of his senior dog. The purpose of this fund is to help find adopting homes for seniors, by assisting potential owners with the cost of veterinary care and medications.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Accreditations

Charity Navigator Rating 2020

Awards

William Donald Schaeffer Award 2021

State of Maryland

Affiliations & memberships

Great Nonprofits - Top Rated Badge 2020

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of animals rescued

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Animal Rescue and Transport

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

RESCUE AND TRANSPORT PROGRAM: Since 2003, HART has rescued cats/dogs from the county shelter and transported them to pre-selected rescue groups where they have a better chance of adoption.

Number of animal adoptions

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Animal Adoption & Sheltering

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

In 2019, the ratio of cats to dogs at the HART Center was 7:3. Most dogs were adopted from HART; however, cats were transported to pre-approved rescues to improve their chances of adoption.

Number of sheltered animals

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Animal Adoption & Sheltering

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

2019 was the first year in which the 'sheltered' animals referred to those residing at the HART Center (as opposed to the county shelter) while waiting to be adopted or transported to other rescues.

Number of Spay/Neuter Surgeries Performed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Low-Cost Spay/Neuter Surgeries

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

HART has 2 programs: Low-cost (HARThelp), and no-cost (Lifesaver)

Total dollars of operating costs per animal per day

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Animal Adoption & Sheltering

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

The first year for which this metric is available is 2016. The Adoption Wing opened in April.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

HART's goals are:

1. Saving the lives of adoptable animals through rescue and transport, rehabilitation, and adoption.

2. Reducing pet overpopulation through low-cost spaying and neutering.

3. Building and operating a humane animal adoption center.

4. Encouraging community involvement in responsible pet ownership.

5. Reducing the incidence of animal abuse and neglect in our region, through example, education and intervention.

In 2006, HART developed a plan that consisted of the following strategies:

1. FUNDRAISING: In a low-population rural community such as Garrett County, the first challenge was to develop a comprehensive fundraising plan to build a facility. This was an important consideration since the county did not have the funds or the community support to improve the current county shelter. The strategy for fundraising was based on developing a recognizable brand, hiring an architect to create renderings of the facility so people could visualize the objective, and conducting mailing campaigns and events for ten years. An important element of fundraising was the support of the local government, which donated the land on which the facility was constructed.

2. A SOLID BUSINESS PLAN: Before writing the business plan, the core volunteers researched similar nonprofits to determine what had worked or failed to work for them. Our research demonstrated that many of the animal facilities encountered difficulties if they depended solely on donations and grants. In many instances, the organizer of the nonprofit was driven by compassion but lacked the staff or the knowledge to sustain an ongoing operation. HART had to be able to provide services that would create revenue to pay the key operating expenses: salaries and facility costs.

3. A WORKABLE OPERATING MODEL: The HART Center was opened in segments, depending on the availability of funds. To make the segments work individually and jointly, it was necessary to establish protocols and procedures and train the staff and the volunteers to follow them. This was accomplished by creating Standard Operating Procedures for each work area. The first areas opened were the revenue-producing areas: the veterinary clinic, the pet boarding area, and the groomer. The last and largest section to be completed was the Adoption Wing, where the adoptable animals are sheltered until they are adopted. They also receive veterinary care, behavior modification, playtime, and temperament evaluation through our HART to HEART program.

4. SUSTAINABILITY: Now that the facility is completed and in full operation, the most important element is working to ensure its sustainability. This work involves continuing to raise funds on a systematic basis, establishing a reserve, implementing a donor management system, and applying for grants that will support the charitable programs. As previously mentioned, the revenue generated by the animal services supports staff salaries and the basic facility expenses. Everything else - Rescue, sheltering, adoption, low-cost and no-cost spay/neuter, public education, and animal rehabilitation and behavior modification - is financed with grants and donations.

1. HART has a staff of 38 employees. The staff of the Adoption Wing and the pet boarding area work in three shifts under the supervision of the work area managers, starting at 7 a.m. and ending at 9 p.m. when the security guard arrives. Management consists of the Executive Director, experienced in managing and fundraising, an Administrator, and the work area managers.

2. The work area managers have various specialties, including veterinary medicine, animal behavior, animal adoption, and animal husbandry.

3. We have close to 250 volunteers dedicated to the cause. We have a volunteer coordinator who recruits, trains and certifies all volunteers. By utilizing a three-part training course, HART ensures the safety and involvement of all participants.

4. We have raised the funds and carried out the construction of a $3.5 million animal center, with our own resources. We have retired business owners who work pro bono for HART and are actively involved in running the daily operations.

5. We have the full support of the county government and other nonprofit organizations.

6. We created a business plan that employed good management practices in order to achieve our charitable goals. For example, every section of the HART Center has its own standard operating procedures, which are updated on an annual basis.

Our accomplishments:

1. As of February, 2022, we have saved the lives of 11,929 animals.
2. We raised $3.5M and built the HART Animal Center, which is a state-of-the-art animal facility, and we have operated it since it opened in 2014.
3. We have performed a total of 12,217 low-cost and no-cost spay/neuter surgeries (as of February 2022).
4. We employ a staff of 36 people, which is a major benefit to an area of the country that is still suffering the delayed effects of the 2008 recession.
5. We have created an animal adoption facility that is welcoming to potential adopters, children, parents, schools - all of whom feel proud that HART built this facility in their community at this time.

Still need to accomplish:

Secure consistent funding to​ make sure that the HART Center can support itself now and in the future.

Financials

HART for Animals, Inc.
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

HART for Animals, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 3/9/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Ms. Jennifer Meyett

HART Volunteer

Term: 2020 - 2022

Michael Pellet

HART for Animals, Inc. - Retired CEO of M2 Limited, Gaithersburg, MD

Susan Hertz

HART for Animals, Inc., Volunteer; Retired Associate Marketing Director and Assistant Dean, American University

Jennifer Meyett

Capital One, Principal Executive Assistant

Debbie Beitzel

Realtor, Taylor-Made Deep Creek Vacations & Sales

Kelli Palamar

Asst VP, BB&T Home Mortgage

Ann Smith

Realtor, Taylor-Made Deep Creek Vacations & Sales

Shannon Book

Sr Finance Mgr, Comptroller, Thermo-Fisher Scientific

Matthew Book

CIO, The Bair Foundation

Jim Hodges

Retired, President & CEO, American Meat Institute

Joe Zamoiski

Owner, Vice President, Team Z Mortgage

Dan Moorehead

Associate Professor, Frostburg State University

Ann Horton

Healthcare Executive, Collaboration Communication, Silver Spring, MD

Julie Stuck

Attorney, self employed

Tina Orndorff

Attorney

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 03/09/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data