Emerald Hills Institute

Make the world better to live in a better world

South Salt Lake, UT   |  http://www.emeraldhillsinstitute.org

Mission

Emerald Hills Institute builds an inclusive community through active conversations among different faiths, cultures, and world views. Our differences are opportunities for connection, and we find compassionate ways to support each other through the channels of art, culture, humanities, education, and stewardship.

Ruling year info

2018

President

Sergazy Nurbavliyev

Main address

PO Box 651282

South Salt Lake, UT 84165 USA

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EIN

82-0675900

NTEE code info

Public, Society Benefit - Multipurpose and Other N.E.C. (W99)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Cooking Class

Turkish cuisine (Turkish: Türk mutfağı) is largely the continuation of Ottoman cuisine, which in turn borrowed many elements from Circassian, Central Asian, Caucasian, Middle Eastern, Balkan and Greek cuisines.[1][2]
Turkish cuisine or Türk mutfağı as it is called has its roots stemming from the Ottoman Empire and its cuisine. The neighboring countries of Turkey also lend their many flavors and cooking styles to make Turkish cuisine world famous. The tastes and flavors vary vastly across the span of Turkey. Local ingredients and culture add a richness and unique twist to the dishes making the culinary experience a mind-blowing one.
Breaking bread together and chatting over a warm meal is a great way to break ice and build bridges to hearts. It also creates grounds for dialog, kinship and friendship and understanding cultures.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth

Emerald Hills Institute thought of the talk series as a venue to cultivate friendship and strengthen civic dialogue among the many civil communities.

The speakers of the talk series include prominent government, elected, corporate and media officials, religious leaders, academics, diplomats, and other civic leaders and they will share their viewpoints and experiences on important issues facing our local communities.

These talk series provide information on important public, intercultural issues and help to build ever-lasting and strong relationships among the diverse ethnic communities in the west coast of USA.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Ashure[1] (Turkish: aşure; Bulgarian and Macedonian: ашуре) or Noah's Pudding is a Turkish dessert congee that is made of a mixture consisting of grains, fruits, dried fruits and nuts. In Turkey it is made all the year and served especially during Muharram,[2] the first month of the Islamic calendar, as the 10th of Muharrem corresponds to the Day of Ashure. ("Ashura" means "tenth" in Arabic.) Ashure is part of the culinary tradition of Turkey as well as many of the surrounding countries like Greece; Christian and Jewish cultures, as well as Muslims, share similar versions of this dessert under a variety of names.

Ashure is one of the limited set of Turkish desserts which contain no animal products. One reason behind it is arguably protesting all kinds of violence and bloodshed.Traditionally, Ashure is made in large quantities to commemorate the ark's landing and is distributed to friends, relatives, neighbors, colleagues, classmates, among others, without regard to the recipient's religion or belief system as an offering of peace and love. Ashure was traditionally made and eaten during the colder months of the year as it is calorie rich fare, but now it is enjoyed year-round.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Ramadan (/ˌræməˈdɑːn/; Arabic: رمضان‎‎ Ramaḍān, IPA: [ramaˈdˤaːn];[note 1] also romanized as Ramzan, Ramadhan, or Ramathan) is the ninth month of the Islamic calendar,[3] and is observed by Muslims worldwide as a month of fasting(Sawm) to commemorate the first revelation of the Quran to Muhammad according to Islamic belief.[4][5] This annual observance is regarded as one of the Five Pillars of Islam.[6] The month lasts 29–30 days based on the visual sightings of the crescent moon, according to numerous biographical accounts compiled in the hadiths.[7][8]

The word Ramadan comes from the Arabic root ramiḍa or ar-ramaḍ, which means scorching heat or dryness.[9]Fasting is fardh (obligatory) for adult Muslims, except those who are suffering from an illness, travelling, are elderly, pregnant, breastfeeding, diabetic, chronically ill or menstruating.[10] Fasting the month of Ramadan was made obligatory (wājib) during the month of Sha'ban, in the second year after the Muslims migrated from Mecca to Medina. Fatwas have been issued declaring that Muslims who live in regions with a natural phenomenon such as the midnight sun or polar night should follow the timetable of Mecca,[11] but the more commonly accepted opinion is that Muslims in those areas should follow the timetable of the closest country to them in which night can be distinguished from day.[12][13][14]

The act of fasting is said to redirect the heart away from worldly activities, its purpose being to cleanse the soul by freeing it from harmful impurities. Ramadan also teaches Muslims how to better practice self-discipline, self-control,[41] sacrifice, and empathy for those who are less fortunate; thus encouraging actions of generosity and compulsory charity (zakat).[42]

Population(s) Served
Adults

Help to spread message about domestic violence.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Reaching out and working with various faith groups to increase the visibility of interfaith understanding.

Population(s) Served
Interfaith groups

We offer Language Classes, Religious Class, Art & Craft, Character Education, Environmental Education, Religious Education, Quran Education, Language Education. We have on-call scholars and faith-based leaders who, working hand in hand with our education volunteers, are trained in helping guide children in understanding messages of religious content in light of historical and contemporary context. Within the format of weekend and evening workshops, students will learn character development and respectful social behavior using scriptural examples explained in terms of today’s understanding, and commitment to law-abiding citizenship is paramount. Students will be taught the religious history of their families and countries of origin as well as that of their neighbors, stressing elements that make for a strong and healthy society as well as positive points of commonality.

Population(s) Served

We offer a Congressional Award mentoring program, after-school ACT/SAT mentoring, after school character, retreat camps, citizenship, humanities, and scholastic tutoring. Emerald Hills Institute and collaborating organizations will provide outreach program services prior to the project start date. Collaborating organizations will assist with enrollment. Emerald Hills and program volunteers will coordinate a series of 8-week ACT and SAT preparation workshops. ACT and SAT workshops target high school students ages 15-18 years old. Character, citizenship, and humanities programs will be age-appropriate continuations of the programs for children, to build continuity and cohesiveness with the programming community.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Children and youth

We offer specialty workshops geared towards helping educators more effectively teach in educational settings and awareness of suicide prevention, child abuse, and critical policies in an educational setting.

Population(s) Served
Immigrants and migrants

Where we work

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    We serve Turkic-American and also other immigrant communities.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    SMS text surveys, Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Community meetings/Town halls, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We organize workshops for community wellbeing programs. We also organize events for kids and youth.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback,

Financials

Emerald Hills Institute
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Emerald Hills Institute

Board of directors
as of 4/18/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Sergazy Nurbavliyev

Overstock

Term: 2024 - 2022

Zeynep Kariparduc

Nargis Tavallo

Jean Irwin

Maddie Scott

Mehmet Soyer

Sergazy Nurbavliyev

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 04/18/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Asian American/Pacific Islanders/Asian
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 04/18/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.