Na Mea Ike Ia

To Promote & Preserve Aloha in the World.

aka The Royal Hawaiian Guard   |   Kahului, HI   |  www.hi-nmii.org

Mission

Impact the youth to achieve excellence in life.

Ruling year info

2017

Executive Director

Mr. Paulo Faleafine Jr

Main address

153 E. Kamehameha Ave STE 104 #223

Kahului, HI 96732 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

82-0746141

NTEE code info

Youth Development Programs (O50)

Cultural, Ethnic Awareness (A23)

Youth Community Service Clubs (O51)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

We work to restore cultural harmony for Native Hawaiian youth and families. A 2020 Office of Hawaiian Education (OHE) study finds Cultural Dissonance as the core reason for Native Hawaiian student challenges leading to incidents, suspensions, or dismissals with a high probability of incarceration. Native Hawaiians account for 24% of the student population yet 45% of all incidents with 38% of total dismissals. This leads to where we see Native Hawaiians in jail with an average incarceration rate of 50% for juveniles and 38% for adults. Critical to the restoration of identity is the proliferation of the Hawaiian language. UNESCO ranks the Hawaiian language as critically endangered. A Hawaii Community Foundation 2021 report finds that of the 1.4 million residents in Hawaii, only 18,610 or 1% are native speakers! Without language, THE CULTURE WILL BE LOST.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

The Royal Hawaiian Guard

Nā Koa Kiaʻi Aliʻi Hawaiʻi – “The Royal Hawaiian Guard” serves as a symbol of resilience and Native Hawaiian identity. Youth learn values, cultural perspectives, and native sourced history. In addition, they conduct community activities as an honor guard, becoming a living symbol of Aloha. The goal of the program is to allow youth to belong to a group that strives to live positive values, identify passions, and support personal growth.

Three services are offered through the Royal Hawaiian Guard program
a. Hawaii Drill Competitions services - supporting all aspects of JROTC drill team competition with civilian and US Military stakeholders.
b. Community Honor Guard services - supporting all community events with priority for Native Hawaiian events with protocols and ceremonial functions as an Honor Guard.
c. Hawaii Military Style Drill coaching and exhibition services - providing High School level coaching in the art of Hawaii Military-style Drill.

Population(s) Served
Military personnel
At-risk youth
Young adults
Veterans
Native Hawaiians

The Aloha Means program is formed to challenge people to discover the meaning of Aloha and apply it to their lifestyle.

The program focuses on three services.
a. Hawaii Aloha project - an interactive learning map featuring cultural stories developed in partnership with Hawaii schools.
b. Farm Feed Empower project - a work/study program for youth 15-24 years old that teaches how to live Aloha and Pono by providing meals for our elderly food insecure from resources they learned to grow, harvest, and prepare for consumption in partnership with local farms and restaurants.
c. Hoʻokahiko project - a youth and family service connecting to the Kanaka ʻŌiwi kahiko practices and traditions of Hawaii.

Population(s) Served
Young adults
Adolescents
Native Hawaiians
Economically disadvantaged people
Farmers

Formed to Harness Smart, Regenerative, Community-Based Tourism to create thriving communities. The initiative has five key goals - 1. Advance Native Hawaiian economic resiliency; 2. Perpetuate Native Hawaiian culture; 3. Improve tourism management and community planning; 4. Grow the Hawaii circular economy; 5. Positively impact communities through tourism and technology.

Utilizing cutting-edge technology we look to connect visitors directly to our native community businesses and organizations while easing the burden placed on our resources through a common-sense approach of providing real-time data of flow and traffic to all areas tourists heavily visit.

The technology will provide opportunities for sector growth in coding, GIS, GPS, LiDAR, Data Analytics, and IoT devices as we identify solutions to address the needs of the County and State to manage tourism and spur a circular economy to obtain then reach beyond a steady-state economy within our communities.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Native Hawaiians
Academics

Where we work

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

We aim to keep Hawaii Hawaiian
- meaning, to preserve and promote positive indigenous culture, identity, and resilience with a community approach.

With skyrocketing prices of housing, low-paying jobs, and lack of opportunity, many Hawaii-born residents and Native Hawaiians under 40 are leaving Hawaii for the US Mainland. Additionally, with the loss of language at 1% of native speakers, cultural practices, and gentrification, the Native Hawaiian culture is in critical danger of extinction.

A community approach to building an inclusive foundation connecting all people to appreciate preserve and promote the Native Hawaiian culture is paramount. Efforts must preserve and promote Aloha, share truth in history and education, and facilitate positive actions and events.

Our goals are
1. Promote and preserve the Native Hawaiian culture of Aloha
2. Develop youth with positive values, identity, and avenues for success
3. Positively impact communities with events and opportunities that drive cultural harmony
4. Use technology to systemically impact communities through the tourism industry
-to advance Native Hawaiian economic resiliency
-to grow the Hawaii circular economy,
-to improve Tourism Management and Community planning

Our strategy is to advance programs centered on core Native Hawaiian values with a youth-focused family-first community approach. We will reach our purpose to promote and preserve Aloha in the world through our mission to impact the youth to achieve excellence in life.

We aim to assist all youth, especially Native Hawaiians, in fulfilling three universal needs - to BELONG, to have a positive IDENTITY, and to realize OPPORTUNITY.

1. Develop and promote historical native-sourced fact-based educational materials to foster a positive identity.
2. Diversify economic opportunity through technology to advance Native Hawaiian businesses and organizations.
3. Use technology to shape the tourism industry with intelligence that will allow for reduced impact on areas and increase engagement opportunities to aid in restoring ocean and land resources with community stakeholders.
4. Conduct activities that develop an appreciation for the Native Hawaiian culture by all in the community
5. Conduct community learning and outreach activities to perpetuate Native Hawaiian practices and skills.
6. Develop community partnerships to promote and celebrate indigenous history, culture, and achievements.
7. Restore farming and cultivation of cultural practices that will teach youth values, life, and entrepreneurial skills while providing food security for our elderly community.
8. Work with youth to identify, explore, and engage in their passions with families and community mentors.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.),

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

Financials

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Na Mea Ike Ia

Board of directors
as of 05/21/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Scot Patrick

Na Mea Ike Ia

Term: 2018 - 2025

Edie Hanohano

Na Mea Ike Ia

Brenda Recichel

Na Mea Ike Ia

Scot Patrick

Na Mea Ike Ia

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 5/3/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Multi-Racial/Multi-Ethnic (2+ races/ethnicities)
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 06/06/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.