Primary Care Haiti

Best practices. Practical training. Partnership.

Plantation, FL   |  www.primarycarehaiti.org

Mission

Primary Care Haiti is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization committed to saving lives by providing evidence-based, practical training to Haitian medical professionals. We partner with hospitals and healthcare centers in rural Haiti and deploy a ‘train the trainer’ model which provides built-in continuity and empowers the Haitian healthcare community to deliver this training. This is why our mission statement is ‘best practices, practical training, partnership. Primary Care Haiti’s main focus is on educating Haitian doctors, nurses, midwives, and other medical providers working in rural towns. Our programs focus on three subjects: cervical cancer screening, emergency response training, and ultrasound.

Ruling year info

2017

President and Co-Founder

Dr Jennifer Michelle Goldman

President and Co-Founder

Dr Kissinger Prophete Goldman

Main address

6919 W.Broward Blvd Box 211

Plantation, FL 33318 USA

Show more addresses

EIN

82-0824425

NTEE code info

Fund Raising and/or Fund Distribution (E12)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990-N.

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Haiti's healthcare system is lacking in primary care and emergency medicine. Cervical cancer, which is preventable, is still the number one cause of cancer in Haitian women. There is no coordinated Haitian emergency medical system. Our organization is focused on educating Haitian physicians, nurses, and other medical professionals on the skills necessary to prevent disease and respond to emergencies around the country.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Cervical Cancer Screening Program

We provide continuing medical education classes to Haitian physicians, nurses, and midwives in cervical cancer screening using visualization with acetic acid and colposcopy to identify pre-cancerous or cancerous lesions.

Population(s) Served

Basic Life Support training is the cornerstone of a successful community healthcare program, yet it is rarely taught in Haiti, even to licensed healthcare professionals. Primary Care Haiti has volunteer Basic Life Support certified trainers come to Haiti to provide a complete training course, including final examination, to hospital employees, nursing and medical students, and to the community. Students who pass the course are given American Heart Association Basic Life Support cards so they, and the hospital, know when it is time to renew their certification. We are focused on providing this training in rural Haiti and have started with L'Hopital Bienfaisance in Pignon, Haiti.

Population(s) Served
Emergency responders

Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) is the cornerstone of any successful emergency medicine, intensive care, and paramedic program, yet it is rarely taught to healthcare professionals in Haiti. Primary Care Haiti has volunteer Emergency Medicine Physicians come and train Haitian medical providers on ACLS.

Population(s) Served
Emergency responders

Primary Care Haiti’s Emergency Response Training program focuses on the rapid-response skills required in an emergency. The program includes Basic Life Support, Advanced Cardiac Life Support, Pediatric Advanced Life Support, Neonatal Resuscitation, triage training, and mass casualty triage and management. Primary Care Haiti volunteer trainers enhance the program by working through scenarios that their students are likely to see in Haiti on a regular basis. Primary Care Haiti donates mannequins so the medical facility may meet our requirement that the trainings continue after our volunteers return home. As in our other programs, Primary Care Haiti requires biannual medical equipment usage report and quarterly training reports to ensure that the healthcare providers’ and broader community’s needs are met.

Population(s) Served
Emergency responders

In rural Haiti, there is practically no availability of advanced imaging such at CAT scans or MRIs. Ultrasound is inexpensive and portable, making it the ideal choice for imaging in many situations. Point of care ultrasound is often the only imaging technique needed to diagnose a multitude of medical conditions. Primary Care Haiti has certified ultrasonographers on its volunteer roster who provide detailed, practical training to Haitian medical professionals, on the following:

Obstetrics: first, second and third trimester

Echocardiography

Abdomen (liver, pancreas, gallbladder, aorta)

Upper and lower extremity venous

Thyroid

Primary Care Haiti and the hosting medical facility enter into a donation agreement in which, in exchange for the ultrasound machine, the medical facility agrees to provide regular trainings and that its providers will use the machine regularly. Primary Care Haiti requires biannual medical equipment usage report and quarterly training reports to ensure that the healthcare providers’ and broader community’s needs are met.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of training workshops

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, People of African descent

Related Program

Emergency Medicine Training Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Training workshops for healthcareworkers in Haiti focusing on cervical cancer screening, basic and advanced life support classes for adults and pediatrics, and diagnostic ultrasound training.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our organization aims to create a coordinated educational training program for Haitian physicians and nurses to learn up to date information on primary care and emergency medicine.

Primary Care Haiti aims to develop training programs for Haitian medical professionals. The strategies we use to accomplish our goals are as follows: First we partner with Haitian public hospital systems that share our goals of providing continuing medial education to Haitian healthcare professionals. Second, we partner with healthcare systems outside of Haiti to encourage them to donate gently used lifesaving medical equipment to hospitals around Haiti. In addition, we focus on fundraising efforts to purchase much needed medical supplies and equipment. Third, we pair volunteer physicians from the US with Haitian physicians on the ground to create curriculum geared specifically toward training Haitian medical professionals in primary care and emergency medicine. Fourth, we organize health fairs to encourage patients to receive life saving care free of charge. These health fairs coincide with our medical training courses so Haitian medical professionals are able to immediately put into practice the skills they have acquired. Fifth, we create a competency program to certify that the Haitian medical professional has gone through the training program and is competent in the skill acquired. Sixth, we keep records of our impact in terms of how many Haitian medical professionals were trained and how many patients were examined.

Our organization is capable of meeting our goals because we focus on one healthcare system, one Haitian medical professional, and one life at a time. We have a tremendous staff of volunteer medical personnel who devote their time to creating a quality curriculum that can provide reliable continuing medical education courses to Haitian doctors and nurses. in addition, our organization has developed strong contacts with physicians and community organizers in Haiti which helps us achieve our goals.

Our organization has made tremendous progress thus far. During our June 2017 trip to Haiti, we developed our partnership with L'Hopital Bienfaisance in Pignon, Haiti. We solidified partnerships with organizations in the US and obtained 12 pallets of donated lifesaving medical supplies and equipment. We partnered with DHL who shipped all of our items to Haiti for free. We trained over 100 nursing and medical students and 5 physicians in cervical cancer screening and emergency lifesaving procedures such as basic life support and advanced cardiac life support. Finally, we performed cervical cancer screening for over 700 patients during our health fair. The future for Primary Care Haiti focuses on solidifying partnerships with other Haitian hospital systems, further developing our core teaching curriculum, developing a sustainable screening and treatment program for cervical cancer utilizing the latest mobile technology, and changing the healthcare paradigm in Haiti toward a focus on primary care and emergency medicine.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Healthcare providers working in Haiti

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    SMS text surveys, Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Community meetings/Town halls,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Based on feedback from our participants, we will be offering new courses based on level of education and skill of participants in order for everyone to benefit equally from our trainings.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Asking for feedback from all participants in our courses has strengthened our relationships with participants and has improved our course offerings. Feedback empowers participants to get what they want and need from our organization.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently,

Financials

Primary Care Haiti
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Primary Care Haiti

Board of directors
as of 5/4/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Dr Kissinger Goldman


Board co-chair

Dr Jennifer Goldman

Marie Moise

Simon Serrao

Joanne Cancelmo

John Voltaire

Catherine Voltaire

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 05/04/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American/African

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 05/04/2021

Policies and practices developed in partnership with Equity in the Center, a project that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems within the social sector to increase racial equity. Learn more

Data
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.