Philanthropy, Voluntarism, and Grantmaking

Little Hearts Fund Inc

The Power To Save Is In Our Hands

aka Little Hearts Fund

Las Vegas, NV

Mission

In developing countries, there are almost 800 pregnancy-related deaths every hour. Most of these tragedies are easily preventable with basic nutrition and access to healthcare. 1. During pregnancy, nutrition is essential to the development of an unborn child. 2. Without a midwife or Doctor present during a complicated delivery, the mother and her unborn child often die. 3. Babies born in poverty are extremely vulnerable during the first 28 days of life, accounting for more than 45% of deaths of children under-5 in developing countries. Our Mission is to reduce maternal, prenatal and neonatal deaths in developing countries by donating food and healthcare to those who genuinely need it to survive. Women and children are the backbone of humanity and are deserving of our care!

Ruling Year

2017

Director

Ms Joanne Mendoza de Silva

Main Address

304 S Jones Blvd 717

Las Vegas, NV 89107 USA

Keywords

humanitarian, charity, donate, children, childrens charity, women, poverty, malnutrition, save the children, charitable organization, non-profit charity, human rights, children in need, womens rights, gender equality, women empowerment, volunteer, pro life, newborn baby, pregnancy, Food For The Poor, feed the poor, humanitarian relief, aid, hunger, child sponsorship, feed hungry children

EIN

82-1837805

 Number

7003082795

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Philanthropy / Charity / Voluntarism Promotion (General) (T50)

International Development, Relief Services (Q30)

International Relief (Q33)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990-N.

Programs + Results

What we aim to solve

There are tens of thousands of preventable pregnancy-related deaths occurring in Southeast Asia every single day. Pregnant women are dying due to malnutrition and illnesses that could have easily been prevented/cured. Tragic deaths of both mothers and unborn babies because midwives were unaffordable during complicated deliveries. Precious newborn babies dying in their mother's arms before reaching 28 days of life due to critical weakness and/or sickness left untreated since birth. The fact that these tragedies are continuously ongoing day-after-day is completely unacceptable! They must stop, and we know how to stop them!

Our programs

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Program #5: CHILD RESCUE MISSIONS

Program #4: SAVING SICK NEWBORNS

Program #3: RESCUE WOMEN AND GIRLS IN LABOR

Program #2: PROVIDE THE URGENT ESSENTIALS (2 COR 8:14)

Program #1: SEARCH AND RESCUE

Where we work

Charting Impact

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?

What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?

How will they know if they are making progress?

What have they accomplished so far and what's next?

Every pregnant woman deserves a healthy pregnancy and safe delivery of her newborn child. This is her right as a human being. Just because a woman lives in poverty and lacks access to employment it does not mean that she -or her baby- should receive a death sentence caused by our neglect. Likewise, every newborn deserves a fighting chance at life no matter how poor their mother is. Every child deserves a promising chance at survival, regardless of what country they're from. Now, with the far-reaching internet, donations of those who care and the determination of loving volunteers, every pregnant woman can have a real shot at a successful delivery, and every newborn baby can have a fighting chance at reaching their 1st birthday.

Our surplus prevents the unnecessary deaths of both mother and child in poverty. Compared to those in developing countries we live a life of excess and abundance. We spend $25 on a single meal when that same amount could have nourished a poor pregnant woman for an entire week. The price of one round of drinks can fund the healthcare for the entire phase of a poor woman's pregnancy. The amount we spend on another pair of shoes can cover the medical bill of a complicated delivery for a young pregnant girl, saving the lives of herself and her baby. OUR STRATEGY IS to stop these unnecessary deaths by converting your donations into food, healthcare and medical interventions for poor pregnant women/girls and newborn babies who would have certainly died without it. As stated in 2 Cor 8:14: “Your abundance can supply their need…that there may be equality:" Province by province, one country at a time we carefully allocate donations until our Mission is fully accomplished in Southeast Asia.

Little Hearts Fund has teams of Volunteers and Human Resources (by means of established/registered ManPower services) on the ground in the Philippines, Laos, Myanmar, Cambodia and Papua New Guinea. LHF-governed teams are available to carry out the LHF programs in the poorest provinces and villages, subject to and limited by available funding only. Please see https://hearts.fund/programs for more detailed information on Program-execution, or alternatively, contact Little Hearts Fund for an interview.

LHF has comprehensive database records and tracking systems so as to follow-up on every dollar spent and every needy-person helped (pregnant women/girls and babies). Counting 'lives saved' is possible only in a life-and-death situation (such as extracting people from a burning building or other forms of extreme disaster relief). However, it is not possible to count lives saved in this line of work where we are spearheading the main causes of pregnancy-related deaths such as malnutrition and lack of access to healthcare etc. Of what we can be absolutely sure are the statistics published by the W.H.O, which provide detailed and accurate statements that pregnancy-related deaths factually: (1) Occur in Southeast Asia more than the Americas, Europe, and Western Pacific combined; (2) Predominantly occur in low-income households (most certainly the homeless and those residing in slums); (3) Are mainly caused by factors directly relating to poverty, namely, malnutrition and lack of access to healthcare services; and (4) Are predominantly due to easily preventable and treatable causes. For the above reasons -although counting lives saved in this line of work is impossible- we can positively track our progress by counting the number of people helped since we are targeting the above on all four counts, and providing direct relief to every pregnant woman/girl and child under 5 in poverty and in desperate need of essential provisions and medical assistance.

Although Little Hearts Fund is a new non-profit in its seedling stage it has already completed its early stages of establishment. Human Resources are established in all 5 target-countries and are ready to commence the LHF Programs. As of this precise moment (20th-Mar 2018) LHF has not yet made any efforts to promote their Mission or request any form of donations or grants, although this is imminent now that their foundation of success is established.

We have big plans to significantly reduce preventable pregnancy-related deaths in Southeast Asia, and we realize this can only be achieved by focusing on one area at a time, especially during start-up. We have identified the Philippines as the best Country to start with as it has one of the highest rates of preventable maternal, prenatal and neonatal deaths in Southeast Asia.

We have identified Manila as the most strategic location to begin with due to the following reasons:
* More than 27,600,000 people in Manila live in abject poverty, failing to survive on less than 76 US cents per day.
* The majority of people living in abject poverty are contained within 586 slums within close proximity to each other, creating momentum for our public awareness campaign.
* Manila has one of the highest birth rates per capita in Southeast Asia.
* The average population for a Manila slum is 75,000-80,000 people per square mile, making our search campaigns the quickest and easiest to complete successfully.
* As most impoverished families living in Manila survive on 'pag-pag' (rotten scraps from the trash) Manila is widespread with curable diseases and illnesses.
* Manila already has extensive medical and healthcare infrastructure in place, all available for a small fee.

To get the latest on progress and achievements or for any other type of update or inquiry please contact LHF directly at https://hearts.fund/contact

External Reviews

Financials

Little Hearts Fund Inc

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Board Leadership Practices

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SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

No

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

No

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

No

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

No

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?

No