PLATINUM2024

Human Rights for Kids

Because every child deserves hope & love.

WASHINGTON, DC   |  www.humanrightsforkids.org

Mission

Human Rights for Kids is an international non-profit organization dedicated to the promotion and protection of human rights for children. We use an integrated, multi-faceted approach which consists of research & public education, coalition building & grassroots mobilization, and policy advocacy & strategic litigation to advance critical human rights on behalf of children in the United States and around the world.

Ruling year info

2018

CEO

James Lee Dold

Main address

PO BOX 5960

WASHINGTON, DC 20016 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

82-2971359

NTEE code info

Children's Rights (R28)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Advocacy

Critical to our work is advocating for policy changes that ensure each state and every country provide protection and a base level of care for children to keep them safe from harm and give them the best opportunity to become thoughtful, caring, and contributing members of their society. Legislative reforms we advocate for range in scope from criminal statutes targeting child predators to juvenile justice reform measures to focus states on rehabilitating and reintegrating children who come into conflict with the law. We also advocate on behalf of children before international bodies, including the United Nations Human Rights Committee & Committee on the Rights of the Child.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Our legal work represents an important part of our advocacy to ensure that children are treated by courts in accordance with acceptable child rights standards. Through either strategic filing of amicus briefs and some direct representation, we ensure that the perspectives and experiences of children are heard, and their rights are respected.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

Justice Roundtable 2019

National Network for Justice 2019

Act 4 JJ Working Group 2019

NJJDP Coalition 2019

Maryland Juvenile Justice Coalition 2019

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number and quality of litigation victories

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Advocacy

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Litigation includes amicus briefs filed at state and federal Supreme Courts.

Number of media articles reflecting preferred issue framing

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Advocacy

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Establishment of “Child Justice Reform Team” which will be the first of six teams to advance our mission in the different areas of child rights advocacy

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Advocacy

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Child Justice reform Team established with hire of four additional staff members in 2022

Number of grants and research funding awarded to the institution

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

HRFK’s long-term objective is to shift the way children are treated in the criminal justice system from a punitive policy framework that promotes disproportionate punishment for children, to a human rights framework that is child-centered and trauma-informed. In doing so, children will be given the support they need to reach their fullest potential. To realize this objective, HRFK’s short-term goals are to 1. Advance the adoption of criminal justice reform for children in key states and in the United States Congress, and 2. Secure legal victories in state and federal appellate courts that advance constitutional and human rights protections for children.

HRFK seeks to create a national paradigm shift, underpinned by laws and policies, in how the justice system views, treats, and sentences children who have experienced trauma. Working in collaboration with, serving, and leveraging an already robust ecosystem of criminal justice reform movements, organizations, and champions, HRFK acts as a field catalyst, providing defined goals, a framework for collective action, and tools and resources to effect systemic change at scale. Specifically, HRFK offers the field:

Policy Research and Recommendations: Through its State Ratings Report, HRFK has identified the 12 laws needed to establish a basic legal framework to protect the rights of all children in the criminal justice system, especially those most vulnerable due to trauma and abuse. These laws provide a blueprint for reform and provide state and local organizations a mechanism for holding their elected officials accountable for achieving positive policy outcomes for children. This advocacy tool galvanizes disparate agendas at the state level, leading to collaborative campaigns around a shared human rights framework.

Public Education: Passing laws is only half the battle, HRFK works to ensure the entirety of the criminal justice system is equipped to take a child-centered, trauma-informed, human rights lens when interacting with children. This includes training for judges, defense attorneys, and prosecutors. External to the judicial system, HRFK seeks to educate the general public through op-eds and media engagement, and often as a ghostwriter for or in partnership with partners in the field. As more stakeholders learn about, understand, and are equipped to address the issue, an ecosystem is cultivated that supports and even demands compliance with the State Ratings Report.

Advocacy: Cultivating and stewarding the support of state and federal legislators and connecting them with strong state-level advocacy campaigns elevates successes at the state level to the national level, influencing both federal policy and creating a “race-to-the-top” whereby states with lower ratings are compelled to take action. Human Rights for Kids has 11 current or former state legislators on its board of directors from around the country and actively conducts outreach and cultivates a network of champions at the federal level.

Strategic Litigation: HRFK engages in and supports strategic litigation to bring about lasting legal reforms on behalf of children through the court system. Activities focus on appellate litigation and submitting Amicus Briefs to advance legal protections for children who have suffered human rights abuses. HRFK’s litigation work is done in concert with its legislative advocacy and public education efforts to maximize impact.

Financials

Human Rights for Kids
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Human Rights for Kids

Board of directors
as of 01/18/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. John Ellem

Human Rights for Kids

Term: 2022 -

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? No
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 12/20/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 12/20/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.