The Job Hackers

Changing the Way People Connect With Their Lives and Careers

San Francisco, CA   |  http://www.thejobhackers.com

Mission

The Job Hackers mission is to increase diversity and higher-level employment in our technology sector with access to free professional training and job placement services. In 2018, we obtained 501(c)(3) status and expanded to the Zoom and Slack with video lessons, Agile literature, meetups, development workshops, and cohort chatrooms. To date, we have produced 964 graduates, and over 35% of respondents from our programs attain related employment within 90 days of graduation. We have a projected 600+ participants for this coming year. We have always led diverse classes, with majority nonwhite participants and 59.7% women. This year, we received a Top 5 Jefferson Award for community service from San Francisco’s KPIX-TV. and twice received the rating of “Best CodingBootcamp” by SwitchUp.

Ruling year info

2018

Chief Agile Officer

Larry Apke

Partners and Ops

David Rawlings

Main address

823 Carolina St

San Francisco, CA 94107 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

82-3031498

NTEE code info

Employment Procurement Assistance and Job Training (J20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990-N.

Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Often people lose jobs through economic dislocation and through no fault of their own. When older individuals lose their job after being employed for awhile, it is very difficult for them to re-engage. The Job Hackers provides very focused "upskilling" of already qualified individuals in Agile and Scrum to reduce the time it takes for them to find and accept work. In addition to the training we help these individuals with job placement skills.

In addition, we serve many who have left work to take care of loved ones and have not worked for some time.

Of the 450-500 traditional boot camps trying change/improve education, level the playing field and increase diversity in tech, we are the only ones targeting people aged 35-50 who are in transition with free Agile and Scrum classes.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Agile training and job placement services

The Job Hackers core is our “Agile MBA” class. This six-week, 18 hour class covers a wide range of topics that prepare participants to pass the Professional Scrum Master (PSM I) Certification. However, unlike a traditional Certified Scrum Master (CSM) two-day course, this class has a curriculum that includes books and online articles that take participants much deeper into what it means to make effective decisions in the complex, knowledge-based world, allowing participants to not only apply this knowledge to software development but to other complex work.

Population(s) Served
Unemployed people
Adults
Ethnic and racial groups
Economically disadvantaged people

Where we work

Awards

Top Ten Best Coding Bootcamps in San Francisco 2020

SwitchUp

Affiliations & memberships

Top 5 Jefferson Award Winners 2021

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our number one goal is to place our participants in meaningful work.

We teach our participants valuable knowledge about software development to prepare them for real-world jobs, then work with them and employers to ensure the proper placement of the participants.

Currently our classes are 100% free to anyone in transition who might benefit from knowledge of Agile and Scrum.

Our ultimate goal is to pay participants to attend our class and encourage workforce re-entry with paid apprenticeships.

Every 10 weeks, we host a 6 week training class, typically from 7:30-9am two days per week in a facility (donated conference room) in person and online.

The curriculum covers Agile and Scrum plus modern educational behavior theory and recommended reading of multiple books.

We provide these classes for free to up to 50 people per class, mostly on referral from other nonprofits, word-of-mouth and/or placement agencies. We are also trying to partner with traditional boot camps and colleges that teach computer science.

We are able to currently train and help place about 250 people per year. We hope by raising additional funds to increase this number substantially over time.

We've been conducting these classes on an informal basis since 2016, but recently incorporated and received our 501(c)(3) status under IRC (early 2018).

Surveying our previous participants we know that a good percentage find high-paying, meaningful work within the first 90 days post training. We have since increased the number of people we serve and are gathering more data about these larger classes to assess our impact.

In the future, with proper funding, we expect to expand our numbers, include proper Agile and Scrum training of software developers and begin paying our participants (who will soon be referred to as apprentices) and giving them more practical, hands-on experience.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    In three years, we have over 1,000 Job Hackers in our community. Anybody who desires can take our free course and participate in job forums, resume building and placement activities. Our average age is 42, 56% women and over half self-identify as non-white. About 35% of graduates get high-paying tech jobs within 90 days of taking our class, with over half of those jobs paying over $100,000/year.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    SMS text surveys, Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Community meetings/Town halls, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    In lieu of paying for the 18 hour class, the founders creatively designed a “Pay it Forward” program, for students to volunteer time. Organizations that have benefitted and received this volunteer assistance include Habitat for Humanities, Daily Bread Soup Kitchen, Project Homeless Connect, Boy Scouts of America, Hope’s Corner and The Mission Continues. The Job Hackers is an approved City vendor and partnered with the OEWD to provide volunteers to the over 45 NGOs receiving economic development funding from the City of San Francisco. Over 3,000 hours have been donated so far.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Participants began forming groups of 3-5 people commit to gain real-world experience using Agile and Scrum methodologies attaining a tech job. We now formalized this program as the Agile Job Search. We provide a volunteer Job Hacker to facilitate five hours per week on weekday standups, one hour per week on Sprint planning, and one hour per week on reviews and peer evaluation. Participants use these Agile practices to collaborate with facilitators and peers on their job search and complete their prior volunteer commitments. Volunteer service during AJS averages 11+ hours per participant, with a target of 18 hours. More than 32% of participants volunteer with project management, software development, and business development roles that directly use Agile skills.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

The Job Hackers
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

The Job Hackers

Board of directors
as of 4/9/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Larry Apke

PG&E

David Rawlings

Code Tenderloin

Jerry Mixon

Young Community Developers

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? No
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 04/09/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 04/09/2021

Policies and practices developed in partnership with Equity in the Center, a project that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems within the social sector to increase racial equity. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.