Atlanta Rescue Dog Cafe

Making People's and Pets' Lives Better

Atlanta, GA   |  https://therescuedogcafe.org/

Mission

Atlanta Rescue Dog Cafe is an educational non-profit dedicated to the well-being of pets and people everywhere. Our mission is to reduce the inflow of pets into shelters, and prevent incidents of animal cruelty - through innovative pet therapy, humane education, and community-building programs.

Ruling year info

2018

Founder & CEO

Aaron Fisher

Main address

913 Cherokee Ave SE

Atlanta, GA 30315 USA

Show more addresses

EIN

82-3388486

NTEE code info

Animal Related Activities N.E.C. (D99)

Public, Society Benefit - Multipurpose and Other N.E.C. (W99)

Youth Centers, Clubs, (includes Boys/Girls Clubs)- Multipurpose (O20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990-N.

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Despite so much good that's been accomplished for Atlanta's pets, the number of animals entering area shelters continues to rise, as does the incidence of animal cruelty and the number of "bite cases." Few local rescue groups have the personnel to offer the educational resources to prevent animals from entering shelters in the first place. Simply put, we haven't spayed/neutered, sheltered, or adopted our way out of the pet overpopulation and animal cruelty problems affecting the community. Atlanta Rescue Dog Cafe addresses the root cause of these issues through innovative educational programs that focus on the critical aspects of prevention and healthy human-animal interactions.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Can I Pet Your Dog?

Children learn the basics of how to safely and comfortably approach a dog, what we can learn from a dog's behavior, and the best way to care for pets in general. This fun and engaging class is accompanied by a short story and one of our therapy dogs. Great for ages 3 and up.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Infants and toddlers

In this innovative and interactive module (for participants ages 8-adult), students learn to fashion dog leashes from re-purposed climbing rope. Interwoven throughout the program, we cover safe and humane pet practices; environmental sustainability and the importance of reducing and reusing (more than 3,000 lbs of material has been kept out of landfills since 2108 through this program); and students write notes dedicating their leash to a special person or pet in their life. Hundreds of leashes in this program have been provided free of charge to local first responders, whom we train how to secure loose pets in emergencies.

At the heart of this, and all our programs, we promote empathy, kindness, and compassion: toward pets, the planet, and people.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Adults

An overview of the growing number of careers in animal welfare, with a focus on the various skills required (science, technology, engineering, arts, math). Perfect for STEM/STEAM nights and career days. Students are taught how they can pursue careers that benefit the pets in their communities, and are provided resources for meaningful internships, volunteer opportunities, apprenticeships, and jobs.

U.S. spending on pets has quadrupled in the last 25 years; why not encourage people to take advantage of these economic and professional opportunities?

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Adults

An introduction of the skills and knowledge to be more confident and safer around pets and strays. This class is scaled to work with kids as young as pre-k as well as adults to promote positive human-animal interactions. The material covered is appropriate for each age group, and is fun and engaging, with activities to reinforce the topics covered. Accompanied by a certified therapy dog.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Adults

Participants learn how to be a more responsible dog parent and the care required to ensure a long, healthy, happy relationship with their pet. How often should you go to the veterinarian? What are the best ways to bond? What prevention measures yield the biggest results (vaccinations, microchips, spay/neuter, collars with id's, etc.)? These are just a few of the topics covered in this fun, thought-provoking, engaging class. Accompanied by a certified therapy dog.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Adults

Students in grades 4-8 learn safe and responsible pet care through our curriculum-aligned math programs that teach measurement, estimation, subtraction, and geometry (circumference, radius, and diameter). Hands-on, innovative, engaging, and fun.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

For students 5th grade-up. This thoughtful and innovative program teaches such elements as cliches and idioms, and allows students to explore whether those figures of speech are examples of humane or inhumane animal practices. For example, when was the last time you thought about the meaning of such sayings as "beat a dead horse," "kill two birds with one stone," "let the cat out of the bag," "no dog in the fight," etc.? These are just a few of the figures of speech we examine in this thought-provoking, engaging, and creative program.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of job skills training courses/workshops conducted

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Adults, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Careers in Animal Welfare

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of groups/individuals benefiting from tools/resources/education materials provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth

Related Program

Responsible Pet Care

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We've been able to achieve this number in 2020 through offering virtual content to our participants (to supplement our in-person offerings) in response to the coronavirus pandemic.

Number of new grants received

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Adolescents

Related Program

Careers in Animal Welfare

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Awards from: Bloom MicroGrant Constellation Community Champion Mary Allen Lindsey Branan The Helen Marie Stern Walmart Community Foundation Binky Foundation Georgia's Own Second Life See Beautiful

Average number of dollars per person served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Age groups, Ethnic and racial groups, Sexual identity, Social and economic status, Work status and occupations

Related Program

The One Leash Project

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of participants engaged in programs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Total number of grants awarded

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Age groups, Ethnic and racial groups, Sexual identity, Social and economic status, Work status and occupations

Related Program

Careers in Animal Welfare

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of volunteers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Age groups, Ethnic and racial groups, Sexual identity, Social and economic status, Work status and occupations

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of organizational partners

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of programs documented

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Adults

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of children served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Economically disadvantaged people, Immigrants and migrants

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Hours of volunteer service

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of returning volunteers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of trained volunteer dog-and-handler teams

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of site visits by dog-and-handler teams.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This number was down in 2020 due to the coronavirus, which limited in-person gatherings.

Total number of volunteer hours contributed to the organization

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of individuals attending community events or trainings

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of participants who felt that they have been provided with a range of options for future employment

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Age groups, Ethnic and racial groups, Sexual identity, Social and economic status, Work status and occupations

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of participants reporting greater issue awareness

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Age groups, Ethnic and racial groups

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of children who have an innate motivation to master and control their environment

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

ARDC's goal is simple - By working on the "front-end of rescue," we aim to reduce the number of pets that enter shelters and become rescues. Through innovative, curriculum-aligned programs, we aim to encourage safe and humane animal practices and responsible pet care so that children and families have positive experiences with their pets; that way fewer pets are surrendered to local shelters. By reducing the inflow of animals into shelters, we seek to help shelters reduce euthanasia rates.

Our innovative humane education programs are designed to align with the curriculum of schools, scout troops, and civic organizations. Our mission is to reach as many individuals as possible (especially children) with our innovative humane education programs that promote positive human-animal interaction and responsible pet care.

ARDC is fortunate to enjoy a broad base of community support that makes our programming possible. We currently have more than 75 volunteers, 45 certified therapy dog teams, local partners, and national organizations contributing to our initiatives.

ARDC's educational programs reach more than 1,000 students a month. Since the beginning of 2018, we've served more than 20,000 individuals (both through in-person and virtual programming), 70% of whom are children, and more than 40% are in under-served communities.

​Through our innovative One Leash Project, not only does the community learn safe and humane animal practices, we've also kept more than 3,500 lbs. of old climbing rope material from entering landfills. Many of the leashes are donated to local first responders, whom we train how to secure loose pets in emergencies, so that they can be returned to their owners, and kept off the streets and out of shelters.

We've been awarded more than 20 grants for our ground-breaking work in our first three years of operation, including grants from:

- The Helen Marie Stern Fund
- Constellations Community Champion Award
- Mary Allen Lindsey Branan Foundation
- Jewish Federation of Atlanta
- The Binky Foundation
- WalMart Community Foundation
- Second Life
- Georgia's Own Credit Union
- See Beautiful Giving Initiative
- and numerous others.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Our programs serve all populations from pre-k to adults, across all SES, ethnic, and other demographics, without preference or discrimination.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Suggestion box/email, Testimonials,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We have made all programming available over virtual platforms to reach even more participants across multiple geographies.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Atlanta Rescue Dog Cafe

Board of directors
as of 3/18/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Aaron Fisher

Atlanta Rescue Dog Cafe

Term: 2017 -

Kristine Schmit

CDC

Robin Harpak

ideas United

Janine Franco

Village Vets of Decatur

Dwayne Marshall

Community Foundation of Chattanooga

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Not applicable
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Not applicable
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Not applicable
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 03/15/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Non-binary, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 03/15/2021

Policies and practices developed in partnership with Equity in the Center, a project that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems within the social sector to increase racial equity. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.