Foundation for Climate Restoration Inc

We can restore a proven safe climate by 2050.

Mission

Our mission is to catalyze action to build full capacity by 2030 to restore the climate by 2050. F4CR is the first foundation dedicated solely to restoring the climate by 2050. Our ten-year plan is to ensure the deployment of climate restoration solutions at the full scale needed by 2030 in order to restore the climate by 2050. The Foundation will serve as a neutral, trusted intermediary building the ecosystem needed to achieve this goal. We will work in partnership with all stakeholders committed to restoring the climate.

Ruling year info

2019

Chief Executive Officer

Rick Wayman

Main address

952 S Springer Rd

Los Altos, CA 94024 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

300x2050 Climate Restoration Foundation

EIN

82-3487365

NTEE code info

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (C01)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990-PF.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2019 and 2018.
Register now

Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

This profile needs more info.

If it is your nonprofit, add a problem overview.

Login and update

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Youth Leaders for Climate Restoration

Provides education, activism, networking, and public speaking opportunities for young people aged 24 and under.

Population(s) Served
Young adults
Students

The Foundation for Climate Restoration (F4CR)’s local chapters are the engine behind F4CR’s advocacy and education efforts. They bring climate restoration to their communities by hosting and attending relevant events; connecting with local government representatives; and advocating for increased climate action. They promote climate restoration through presentations, op-eds, letters to the editor, podcasts, social media posts, book clubs, movie nights, and more.

Population(s) Served
Activists

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of meetings or briefings held with policymakers or candidates

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Local Chapters

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

After detailed training sessions, local chapter members hold meetings with policymakers to promote climate restoration policies. We expect a significant increase in this metric in 2022.

Number of new local chapters formed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Local Chapters

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of program graduates

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents, Young adults

Related Program

Youth Leaders for Climate Restoration

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The number of youth (ages 13-24) around the world who have completed all requirements to graduate as a Certified Climate Restoration Advocate. The program began operating in earnest in 2021.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The Foundation for Climate Restoration's goal is to create the enabling environment for restoration-scale carbon dioxide removal to begin operating by 2030. This "enabling environment" will be established through three main pillars:
1. Changing public consciousness about solutions that can be adopted to restore the climate, through educational initiatives and communications.
2. Bringing climate restoration innovators together with investors who want to use their funds to make a dramatic difference in the world.
3. Encouraging governments at all levels (local, regional, national, and international) to adopt policies that will advance climate restoration activities, such as carbon dioxide removal.

The climate restoration movement is focused on securing a safe and healthy climate for today’s youth and future generations. The voices of young people are the most important to our movement. The Foundation for Climate Restoration (F4CR) has built a program—Youth Leaders for Climate Restoration (YL4CR)—that educates youth activists and students on climate restoration. This train-the-trainer program is intended to rapidly scale up the number of youth who can:
1. Understand the opportunity of climate restoration.
2. Speak compellingly about it.
3. Train others to understand and speak about it.

F4CR’s local chapters are the engine behind F4CR’s advocacy and education efforts. Local chapters bring climate restoration to their communities by hosting events, attending relevant community events, connecting with local government representatives, and advocating for increased climate action. They spread the word about climate restoration through presentations, op-eds, letters to the editor, social media posts, book clubs, movie nights, and more. They encourage their communities to join the climate restoration movement by passing climate restoration resolutions, procurement legislation, letters of support, and outreach to F4CR leadership.

F4CR provides educational resources to its community, free of charge, so that anyone interested in climate change can learn about the opportunity of climate restoration. Educational resources provide the background needed for the climate restoration movement to grow and support the development of climate restoration solutions and legislation. These resources encompass both self-guided digital lessons and a series of materials related to climate restoration solutions.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    We serve youth (ages 13-24) from many different countries via our youth leaders program. We serve people of all ages from around the world in our local chapters program.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We received feedback from some of our local chapter advocates in Global South communities that the policies our local chapters were promoting were not relevant to their local context. In listening to this feedback, we adapted our local chapters program in the Global South to be much more adaptive to the local context and the needs of the local community, in line with our mission.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Asking for -- and receiving -- feedback from our stakeholders is always a reminder to leadership about why the organization exists, and the need to keep them at the forefront of driving our strategies. This is particularly true of our work with young people in all countries, as well as with our local chapter members in Global South areas.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback,

Financials

Foundation for Climate Restoration Inc
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Foundation for Climate Restoration Inc

Board of directors
as of 2/21/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Sharon Fiekowsky

Terry Mollner

Trusteeship Institute

Alan Hyman

Fremont Bank

Priya Vora

Future State

Nicole Gardner

IBM

Sandra Kwak

10Power

Sharon Fiekowsky

Pete Ryan

Ryan & Wetmore

Ashley Meeky

Marcus Pearson

Tom Baruch

Baruch Future Ventures

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 01/26/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 01/26/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.