M'ever LaYam

Connecting People. Creating Community.

SAN PEDRO, CA   |  www.meverlayam.org

Mission

M'ever LaYam creates tangible connections between American Jewish youth and Israel by connecting them with lone soldiers from their communities who are currently serving in the Israel Defense Forces. We send care packages twice a year from America to Israel, bringing feelings of home to Israel.

Ruling year info

2018

President & CEO

Drew Leach

Main address

3130 S PECK AVE

SAN PEDRO, CA 90731 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

82-3583020

NTEE code info

Jewish (X30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990-N.

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Every year, hundreds of young American Jews leave their homes, families, and communities to make "aliyah" to Israel. Some are born Israeli citizens and returning to fulfill their mandatory service. Due to their age, these new citizens of Israel are required to serve in the Israel Defense Forces. Since they are alone and without family, these new recruits are called "Lone Soldiers". In their first months and years in Israel, they find themselves in foreign settings far away from the familiarities of home. M’ever LaYam was developed with lone soldiers as partners in providing support to North American Jewry and to increase Diaspora Jews’ emotional attachment to Israel. This way, the lone soldier also becomes an active participant in building ties to their own community. As such, M’ever LaYam is very different from other lone soldier organizations. By connecting them with Jewish students and youth organizations from their home towns, we foster educational connections that are strength

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

M'ever LaYam

Twice per year, we bring communities together to send care packages to American-Israelis (Lone Soldiers) serving their mandatory service in the Israel Defense Forces. These care packages uplift morale and bring feelings of home to young people who are living away from their friends and family.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Jewish people

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Total number of organization members

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Jewish people, Military personnel

Related Program

M'ever LaYam

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Organization members include synagogues, religious day schools, youth groups and Hillel's. From 2020 on, restructuring resulted in increased engagement in community participation.

Number of new organizations signing on as collaborators

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Jewish people, Adults

Related Program

M'ever LaYam

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

There are a limited number of organizations that can collaborate due to the nature of our work, however the goal is to eventually work with all of organizations serving our target populations.

Total number of new organization members

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Jewish people, Military personnel

Related Program

M'ever LaYam

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Each year saw an increase in numbers of organizations enrolled. In 2020, the Pandemic pushed us to adopt a model of focusing on community participation and not just organizations.

Number of Lone Soldiers Served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Military personnel

Related Program

M'ever LaYam

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Lone soldiers are served by being connected to communities as well as receiving care packages for Chanukah and Yom Ha'atzma'ut.

Number of care packages delivered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Military personnel

Related Program

M'ever LaYam

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of participants engaged in programs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Military personnel, Children and youth

Related Program

M'ever LaYam

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Beginning in 2019, we opened the care package drive to public participation. This metric includes the number of community members who have written letters to be included in care packages and donated.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

We understand the challenges of decreased identification and emotional investment in Israel by diaspora Jewish youth. In order to bridge the gap between young American Jews and Israel, M'ever LaYam aims to create real human connections between Americans and lone soldiers from their communities through the sharing of videos, the sending of packages, and meeting face-to-face. These soldiers and students share the same culture, memories from the same places, and even the same friends.

We hope to foster an environment of appreciation, love and support for all of our participants, and are committed to devoting our energy, passion, and resources to furthering the goal of creating a meaningful and lasting connection between Diaspora Jewry and Israel.

M'ever LaYam is comprised of structured connections for students to form a personal relationship with their soldier through monthly video updates and more. Two times per school year, participants send care packages with a value of up to $50 to their soldier along with hand written letters of encouragement and any home made items such as friendship bracelets, drawings, etc.
We believe that the best education is experiential education. Through forming relationships, writing letters, asking questions, raising tzedakah (charity) and fulfilling wishes, participants are engaging with Israel on many different levels. Each age group, whether middle school, high school or college, will be able to take away different meanings from their experience. This program is not politically affiliated and is not attached to any lesson plans. Therefore, educators are free to frame the program in a way that best suits their community.

We work with over 40 communities across the West Coast to implement the program.

We've connected over 60 soldiers to an equal amount of communities across the United States in our first launch year. In year 2, we have an additional 35 soldiers that signed up for the 2018-2019 school year from the West Coast alone.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    We serve lone soldiers, community members, synagogues and schools, and organizations that serve lone soldiers serving in the Israel Defense Forces.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    SMS text surveys, Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Community meetings/Town halls, e-mail and website contact form,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    In order to ensure that all care packages are delivered to active duty lone soldiers, we'll be cross referencing lists of soldier package sign ups with organizations in Israel that serves lone soldiers in Israel.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    It gives them the empowerment to participate in the program and adapt it to a way that works the best for all of us.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

Financials

M'ever LaYam
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

M'ever LaYam

Board of directors
as of 10/15/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Drew Leach

Michelle Fryer

Barak Raviv Foundation

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Not applicable
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? No
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 10/15/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Jewish, Iranian-American
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 10/15/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.