Factory Farming Awareness Coalition

We tell the truth about animal agriculture

Berkeley, CA   |  www.ffacoalition.org

Mission

We empower people to end factory farming.

Ruling year info

2018

Executive Director

Monica Chen

Main address

1569 Solano Ave #518

Berkeley, CA 94707 USA

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EIN

82-4594246

NTEE code info

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (B01)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Classroom Programming, Advocacy Institute, and Leadership Collective

Our three programs integrate to cultivate feedback loops in students’ communities. FFAC educators visit high school and college classrooms to teach engaging lessons on the impacts of factory farming. These hour-long lessons also provide a space for us to encourage enthusiastic students to apply for our Advocacy Institute, where they gain a deeper understanding of the impacts of factory farming as well as strategies to become successful advocates. Students who complete the Advocacy Institute become members of FFAC’s Leadership Collective, where they receive lifelong support to become effective agents of change.

Population(s) Served

Our three programs integrate to cultivate feedback loops in students’ communities. FFAC educators visit high school and college classrooms to teach engaging lessons on the impacts of factory farming. These hour-long lessons also provide a space for us to encourage enthusiastic students to apply for our Advocacy Institute, where they gain a deeper understanding of the impacts of factory farming as well as strategies to become successful advocates. Students who complete the Advocacy Institute become members of FFAC’s Leadership Collective, where they receive lifelong support to become effective agents of change.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
Adults
Adolescents
Adults

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

Association of Professional Humane Education 2022

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of new advocates recruited

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Classroom Programming, Advocacy Institute, and Leadership Collective

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our Vision:
A just and sustainable food system for all.

Our Mission:
We empower people to end factory farming.

Our Values:
Knowledge: We only share information from peer-reviewed sources and regularly update our materials. We are sensitive to indigenous and non-Western perspectives.
Self-Awareness: We acknowledge our unearned privileges and strive to amplify minoritized and oppressed voices.
Agility: Our programs are informed by current thought on behavior change, and we are prepared to change course in light of scientific advances and societal changes.
Compassion: We oppose the institution of factory farming, but have compassion for individuals who (willingly or not) participate in the system. We meet people where they are, recognizing that changing attitudes and behaviors is a long-term process. We support our team and others doing this emotionally challenging work.
Collaboration: We can best serve FFAC's mission by working together. We always strive to complement existing resources rather than duplicate them. We recognize that systems of oppression are interconnected and affect both human and non-human life. We invest in meaningful relationships with each other and with other organizations and groups advocating for social and environmental justice.

Diversity Statement:
In pursuit of a more just food system, FFAC is guided by values of inclusivity, compassion, and collaboration, and we recognize that equity, access, and belonging must be core facets of our organization. We are committed to hiring and retaining a diverse and culturally competent staff, engaging in anti-racism and anti-oppression work, and creating an environment in which all team members can thrive.

FFAC educates people on factory farming’s devastating impacts on people, animals, and the planet, and empowers them to advocate for systemic change in their communities. Our approach is intensive, long-term, multifaceted, and designed to build significant and lasting capacity for the movement.

Our three programs integrate to cultivate powerful feedback loops in students’ communities. FFAC educators visit high school and college classrooms to teach engaging lessons on the impacts of factory farming. These hourlong lessons also provide a space for us to encourage enthusiastic students to apply for our Advocacy Institute, where they gain a deeper understanding of the impacts of factory farming as well as strategies to become successful advocates. Students who complete the Advocacy Institute become members of FFAC’s Leadership Collective, where they receive lifelong support to become effective agents of change.

We are concentrating on high school and college students in six major regions across the United States—Seattle, the Bay Area, Southern California, Denver, Chicago, and New York City— with a particular emphasis on relationship building with “higher engagement schools,” where we are visiting multiple classrooms and have multiple trained student advocates. Once we gain traction in these schools, we connect our advocates to partner organizations, such as Better Food Foundation, Friends of the Earth, and The Humane League, to effectively implement their campaigns.

Classroom Programming
Our classroom programming educates high school and college students about the impacts of factory farming on the environment, marginalized groups, public health, and nonhuman animals. Because we can connect and customize our lessons to nearly all curricula, we’re able to reach students in multiple grades and various subject areas. As freshmen, they may hear us in their health class, as sophomores, their environmental science class, as juniors, their English class. Each time, they learn more about the consequences of animal agriculture as well as the power of their votes as citizens and consumers.

Advocacy Institute
Motivated students apply to participate in FFAC’s semester-long Advocacy Institute. The Advocacy Institute, which has both an educational and a practical component, equips them with comprehensive knowledge and experiential training to advocate successfully in their communities. Not only do they gain a broad and systematic understanding of factory farming’s impacts through a thoughtfully prepared curriculum, but we directly support them in running institutional campaigns, giving our presentations in their classes and organizations, creating and sharing social media, and writing articles, among other efforts.

Diversity is integral to a strong and resilient movement. We seek to recruit from a multiplicity of backgrounds and to promote marginalized voices. Students are often members of other movements and organizations tied to environmental and social justice as well as public health. Through their work with us, they learn to connect the impacts of factory farming to the mission and values of their other communities.

Leadership Collective
Students who complete the Advocacy Institute become members of FFAC’s Leadership Collective. The Leadership Collective aims for both near-term impacts in members’ communities and long-term capacity building. This program offers specialized support with members’ projects and opportunities to attend professional development workshops we offer in conjunction with partner organizations. Through these partnerships, members gain access to training in lobbying, journalism, public health, and food tech. Members learn from experts and have ample opportunities to network and benefit from the support of their peers.

Since 2014, FFAC has grown from one employee to employees in fifteen regions across North America. Our reach has grown from 3,000 people per year to around 57,000 people per year, and our scope of programmatic activity has expanded from the first phase of humane education to mentoring activists and leading institutions towards meaningful change.

In post-presentation surveys, 88% of audience members indicate an intention to reduce or eliminate their consumption of animal products. Qualitative feedback indicates that we’re transforming people's perception of the food system and empowering them to speak with their friends and family about what they have learned.

FFAC’s powerful presentations provide us access to diverse and important audiences that lead us towards opportunities to inspire and engage future activists and interns or volunteers, and to institute food policies at schools, on campuses, at companies, community centers, and cities/municipalities. Other notable numbers include:

- From 2018 to 2019 our internship program grew from 10 to 50 interns.
- Since 2017, our team has attended 41 music festivals, shown virtual reality to over 10,400 people and distributed over 73,00 leaflets.
- Since 2014 over 500 people have participated in our public advocacy trainings.
- In the last two years, over 150 FFAC staff and volunteer activists have spread the word at 500 rallies, strikes, festivals and community events, distributing over 100,000 flyers and generating 20,000 email sign-ups.
- As of 2018, four cities have adopted Green Monday resolutions, and we are currently working with four others on passing plant-based institutional initiatives.
- Since 2018, FFAC has worked with 26 corporations, 22 universities, 15 faith groups, seven non-profit groups, six cities, five government agencies, and three K-12 schools/districts to institute plant-based foods programming into cafeterias and institution culture.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Students in high schools and universities across the country.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person),

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

Factory Farming Awareness Coalition
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Factory Farming Awareness Coalition

Board of directors
as of 5/6/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Ms. Katie Cantrell

Better Food Foundation

Term: 2018 - 2022


Board co-chair

Ms. Eva Kalea

Threshold Podcast

Term: 2018 - 2022

Verena Rossa-Roccor

University of British Columbia

Bonnie Brown

Passion Placement

Naomi Sachs

James Glauber

Kia Hill

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 07/15/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Asian American/Pacific Islanders/Asian
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, or other sexual orientations in the LGBTQIA+ community
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 04/29/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.