PLATINUM2024

MENDOCINO COUNTY FIRE SAFE COUNCIL

Ukiah, CA   |  https://firesafemendocino.org

Mission

To inform, empower and mobilize county residents to survive and thrive in a wildfire-prone environment.

Notes from the nonprofit

Thank you for the work you do for nonprofits!

Ruling year info

2007

Executive Director

Scott Cratty

Main address

PO Box 263

Ukiah, CA 95482-0263 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

83-0395685

NTEE code info

Fire Prevention / Protection / Control (M24)

Natural Resource Conservation and Protection (C30)

Community Coalitions (S21)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Mendocino County, CA is an area of very high wildfire risk. We work to educate and prepare county residents with the best approaches to home hardening, neighborhood organizing, evacuation, etc., for the safest possible outcome in a wildfire event.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Fire Fuels Reduction

The largest single component of MCFSC’s operation was providing project management services for grant projects to reduce fuel loads in Mendocino County. In the fiscal year the MCFSC completed road clearing work in the Hopland and McNab Road areas funded by a grant from PG&E. In the spring and early summer of 2020 the MCFSC also completed substantial preliminary work (such as holding community educational forums, obtaining land owner access permissions, and preparing and filing environmental compliance documentation) for two larger projects. First, the Mendocino County Fire Preparedness Program will ultimately provide over 10 miles of road clearing and many community chipping service days in the Brooktrails and Williams Ranch Road areas. The Brooktrails competent of that project was more than 50% complete in the fiscal year. Second, the Ukiah Valley Fire Fuels Reduction project, the first component of which is 17 miles of roadside clearing work on key ingress/egress routes in and around the Ukiah Valley. That work was over 75% completed by the end of the fiscal year.
MCFSC also purchased its own wood chipper, which will increase our ability to deliver community chipping services and reduce those costs in future years.

Population(s) Served
Age groups

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of grants received

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Ethnic and racial groups, People with disabilities, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Fire Fuels Reduction

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

2022 & 2023 grant counts are estimates to be updated.

Number of participants reporting change in behavior or cessation of activity

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Fire Fuels Reduction

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

70% of MCFSC's Chipper Day clients said they wouldn't have done their defensible-space work without this motivation. 85% did additional work beyond that required. 97% rated the experience as 5 stars.

Number of clients served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Fire Fuels Reduction

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

284 reflective address signs produced; free defensible-space clearing at 81 low-income senior/disabled homes; free Chipper Day service for 1000+ residents; gave 16 groups Micro-Grants totaling $104K

Number of press articles published

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Fire Fuels Reduction

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Informational articles about wildfire preparedness and resiliency, and programs offered by MCFSC to the general public or Neighborhood Fire Safe Councils.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our mission is "To inform, empower and mobilize county residents to survive and thrive in a wildfire-prone environment." Wildfires are an integral part of the California ecosystem, and our main goal is to prepare people residing in vulnerable areas to:

better understand wildfire risks and behaviors
protect their homes from ignition in a wildfire event
have a safe and pre-planned evacuation if needed
organize with neighbors to accomplish all of the above and
incorporate forest-stewardship principles in work done.

Our strategies to accomplish our goals include:

education of the general public through media interviews, press articles, blogs, social media posts, website videos, publications, and events
road-clearing, fuel-break and hazard-tree removal projects for safer egress for evacuating residents and safe and successful ingress for first responders
chipper days in which residents clear defensible space around their homes and have their cleared brush chipped, free of cost
advocating with local government to support hazard mitigation and other ordinances and initiatives
encouraging and supporting Neighborhood Fire Safe Councils by educating about their effectiveness, offering Micro-Grants (also for local fire departments) for small priority projects, holding leadership and technical advisory meetings, offering information, fiscal sponsorship for large grants, access to chippers, discounts on emergency alert services, and more.

The Mendocino County Fire Safe Council receives strong support from state and local governments and organizations, fire professionals, and the general public. We receive significant financial support from all levels of government as well as local sources including a growing membership of individual supporters. Our Executive Director has broad-based community-organizing, business and nonprofit experience, and he has been reinvigorating what was for years a nearly inactive organization. We enjoy a great deal of community appreciation and recognition of the importance of this work throughout the county, and expect it to continue and expand in coming years.

In Fiscal Year 2022-23, we accomplished the following:
organizational stability and vigor continue to grow; we now have a staff of 9 and a board of 7, and held an all-day board-staff retreat to create a new 3-year Strategic Plan;
our Community Chipper Program provided 94 Chipper Days to over 1,000 residents;
our Defensible Space Assistance for Income-Eligible (DSAFIE) program provided free brush-clearing, etc. at 81 homes of low-income seniors and persons with disabilities who were both financially and physically unable to do their own work, with high levels of appreciation and praise expressed for our staff and crew and the work done;
our Micro-Grant Program assists local fire departments and fire safe councils with small priority projects or purchases; in its second year, 16 groups received $104,000, and all of the 11 projects from the previous (launch) year were successfully completed;
we sponsored one major ($1.85M) and 3 smaller (total $135K) grants for our affiliated Neighborhood Fire Safe Councils;
we helped lead a successful ballot initiative to dedicate a small portion of county sales tax for fire safety and prevention;
our Home Assessment program provided education and customized advice for 68 homeowners giving them information and specific steps to make their property more wildfire-safe; some of these events include neighbors and community members to further raise interest & awareness;
284 reflective address signs were created & distributed for improved responder access;
we are now contracting with three remote fire districts to pay their off-season personnel to do defensible-space and related work where travel distance makes it prohibitive for our own crew;
several major road-clearing, fuel-break, and other on-the-ground projects have been completed or are ongoing or in planning stages;
we expanded our equipment inventory and secured safe storage for it, as well as getting our own storage unit for office and event-related items, rather than renting offie space;
regular meetings continue to be held for both our Neighborhood Fire Safe Council leadership and Technical Advisory Group;
we continue outreach and education through community meetings, articles, blogs, social media, etc plus printed/mailed items, most recently "Preparing Your Home for Wildfire";
we staffed booths at many community events, sponsored home-hardening presentations for the general public, organized a 2-day home-hardening training by the National Fire Protection Association for local contractors, landscapers and supply store employees; we also co-sponsored Spanish-language emergency preparedness education meetings;
we now have nearly 1500 subscribers to our email newsletter, about 1,600 monthly website visitors, a Facebook reach of 4,000+, and 86 videos on our YouTube channel;
both membership and Neighborhood Fire Safe Council organizing have expanded significantly this year; we now have 70+ affiliated NFSCs.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We act on the feedback we receive, We share the feedback we received with the people we serve

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time

Financials

MENDOCINO COUNTY FIRE SAFE COUNCIL
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

MENDOCINO COUNTY FIRE SAFE COUNCIL

Board of directors
as of 04/10/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Ms. Nancy Armstrong-Frost

Charlie Kelly

Lisa Bauer

Joe Zicherman

Nancy Armstrong-Frost

Mike Jones

UCCE

Sue Carberry

Anna Garza

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Not applicable
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 1/22/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 12/01/2020

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.