Youth Development

Children of Promise NYC

Embracing and empowering children of incarcerated parents

aka CPNYC

Brooklyn, NY

Mission

To embrace children of incarcerated parents & empower them to break the cycle of intergenerational involvement in the criminal justice system.

Ruling Year

2007

Principal Officer

Sharon B. Content

Main Address

54 Macdonough St

Brooklyn, NY 11216 USA

Keywords

afterschool program, one-to-one mentoring program, advocacy, connection to imprisoned parent, support services, counseling services, mental health, clinical service, Sharon Content

EIN

83-0440009

 Number

4151534021

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Youth Development Programs (O50)

Mental Health Association, Multipurpose (F80)

Specialized Education Institutions/Schools for Visually or Hearing Impaired, Learning Disabled (B28)

IRS Filing Requirement

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Programs + Results

What we aim to solve New!

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Our programs

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

After-school

Project DREAM Mentoring

Wellness Center/Therapeutic Services

Summer Camp

Where we workNew!

Charting Impact

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?

What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?

How will they know if they are making progress?

What have and haven't they accomplished so far?

The mission of CPNYC is to embrace children of incarcerated parents and EMPOWER them to break the cycle of intergenerational involvement in the criminal justice system.

The program works to achieve through the following goals:

• Provide services that are co-located, integrated, accessible, and collaborative.

• Treat the whole family and provides services that are individualized to each family's specific needs and circumstances.

• Provide critical early intervention to young children and continue to serve them as they get older.

• Seek to redefine what is “normal" for children who have experienced violence, loss, crime, and trauma at a very young age.

• Engage youth in creative enrichment activities in an effort to disengage them from their emotional challenges, shift their focus, and learn to regulate their emotions and behavior.

• Provide participants and their families with a wide range of co-located services to address their complex needs.
• Provide intensive program intervention.
• Provide program services to parents and caregivers and involve them in their child's treatment and progress.
• Adhere to evidence-based best practices in all service areas.

CPNYC provides services year round—the after-school program operates from September through June, while the summer day camp is offered in July and August. Mental health treatment, mentoring, and family support services are available throughout the year. Services are highly integrated across these core program components. Program leaders and staff work in close collaboration to ensure that every participant and their family members have access to the appropriate services and that their individual needs are understood and addressed.

CPNYC implements evidence-based practices and strategies in each of its five core services areas. These practices have been cited as best practices and endorsed by experts in the fields of youth and family programming and mental healthcare (among others) and include: the Afterschool Alliance, the Forum for Youth Investment, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, MENTOR (The National Mentoring Partnership), National Institute of Health Care Management Foundation, National Association of Young Children, and Child Welfare League of America.

The following questions detail the indicators CPNYC examines to track participant outcomes:

What are the academic outcomes for participating participants? Is program dosage associated with improved participant outcomes?

What are the social, emotional, and personal outcomes for participating participants? Is program dosage associated with improved participant outcomes?

Does the program lead to improvements in participants' behavior (in school and at CPNYC), particularly in their ability to regulate their own behavior and manage their own emotions?

Are participants actively engaged in after-school enrichment activities?

Does the program lead to improvements in verbal communication skills?

Are participants engaged in positive interactions with peers and adults in the after-school program?

Are participants gaining skills to effectively cope with trauma?

Are participants avoiding involvement with the criminal justice system?

What is the quality of the mentor-mentee relationships?

To what extent are parents/care givers involved and prepared to support their children as a result of CPNYC?

Participation in CPNYC had a strong impact on the mental health and behavior of participants.

Participation in CPNYC helped participants improve their relationships with others.

There is some evidence that participants benefit academically, although this is an area that will be studied further.

Participants were highly engaged in CPNYC and had the opportunity to experience new things through their participation in the program.

Through CPNYC, parents and caregivers were supported and empowered to become more involved in their child's treatment and progress.

Parents and caregivers' mental health has improved as a result of the mental health treatment and support they have received.

Families are functioning more cohesively as a result of the services they received from CPNYC.

IMPACT ON PARTICIPANT OUTCOMES
Outcome Area % Improved*
Social
Relationships with peers 94%
Relationships with CPNYC staff 94%
Relationships with parents/care givers 90%
Caring about others' feelings 88%

Behavioral
Solving problems 87%
Decision making 85%
Taking responsibility for one's own actions 77%
Self-regulating one's own behavior 71%

Academic
Motivation to do school work 84%
Time spent doing homework 70%
*Percentage of checklists on which staff agreed or strongly agreed that
participants improved.

External Reviews

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Financials

Children of Promise NYC

Fiscal year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Board Leadership Practices

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

Yes

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

Yes

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Yes

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

Yes

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?

Yes

Organizational Demographics

In order to support nonprofits and gain valuable insight for the sector, GuideStar worked with D5—a five-year initiative to advance diversity, equity, and inclusion in philanthropy—in creating a questionnaire. This section is a voluntary questionnaire that empowers organizations to share information on the demographics of who works in and leads organizations. To protect the identity of individuals, we do not display sexual orientation or disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff. Any values displayed in this section are percentages of the total number of individuals in each category (e.g. 20% of all Board members for X organization are female).

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Gender

Race & Ethnicity

Sexual Orientation

This organization reports that it does not collect this information for Board Members, Senior Staff, Full-Time Staff and Part-Time Staff.

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Diversity Strategies

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We track retention of staff, board, and volunteers across demographic categories
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We track income levels of staff, senior staff, and board across demographic categories
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We track the age of staff, senior staff, and board
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We track the diversity of vendors (e.g., consultants, professional service firms)
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We have a diversity committee in place
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We have a diversity manager in place
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We have a diversity plan
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We use other methods to support diversity