Mental Health, Crisis Intervention

The Voices Project

End Addiction. Inspire Recovery.

aka The Voices Project   |   Las Vegas, NV   |  https://voicesriseup.org

Mission

Our primary mission is to provide resources to communities affected by America's addiction crisis by inspiring civic engagement and participation. By giving voice to those impacted by the crisis - families, communities, and people in recovery from addiction - we can end this public health crisis. Our community is resilient. And our voices matter. The Voices Project also distributes the anti-overdose medication naloxone, conducts community overdose response trainings, and provides recovery support resources.

Ruling year info

2018

Principal Officer

Mr. Ryan Hampton

Co Principal Officer

Mr. Garrett Hade

Main address

4800 Alpine Place Suite 6

Las Vegas, NV 89107 USA

Show more addresses

EIN

83-0895051

Cause area (NTEE code) info

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (F01)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The Voices Project was created as a response to the ongoing drug epidemic. The need is overwhelming: whatever we do, must be done to the utmost, and as quickly as possible. The Voices Project is a response to the call to think bigger—in our advocacy, philanthropy, planning, and actions. We recognized that the capacity of community engagement in recovery was severely underdeveloped. The epidemic disproportionately affects disadvantaged people, who are at higher risk for substance-related death. The stigma of addiction, lack of education about substance use disorder, limited recovery resources, proliferation of addictive substances, and almost zero legal protections for people who struggle with addiction have created a national health crisis that kills one person every four minutes. More than 200 people die of substance-related causes every day. 130 of those deaths are due to opioids.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Mobilize Recovery

Addiction is a crisis of epidemic proportions and shows no sign of slowing down. It affects people of every race, class, social group, religion, and gender. It does not discriminate. Currently, 23 million Americans are in sustained recovery from substance use disorder. Another 22 million are suffering from this highly preventable, treatable illness. One in every three households includes a person with substance use disorder; beyond the home, the prevalence of addiction affects almost everyone. From healthcare systems overloaded with people desperate for help, to criminal justice courts crammed with people who need treatment instead of jail time, our society is burdened by the stigma of addiction. Without civic engagement, organization, and recovery advocacy, millions of people will never access the life-saving support they need. Currently, less than 10 percent of people will ever seek medical help of any kind for their addiction. Hundreds of people lose their lives daily, leaving behind family members, friends, loved ones, children, and community members. Yet, when the recovery community organizes, reform is possible. Activists have successfully accessed funding for recovery supports, effective and ethical standards for treatment, and changes to employment processes. When recovery speaks, people listen. Yet, finding solutions is delayed by lack of access to other community groups and difficulty connecting with like-minded people. We follow in the footsteps of social justice movements such as the Civil Rights movement, ACT UP, and the fight for LGBTQ rights. What we’ve learned is that policy change is crucial to keeping the hard-won gains of grassroots activists who took to the front lines in the fight for equality. With more people engaged, we make more progress. As a mobilized, civically engaged constituency of consequence, we can turn the tide of the epidemic and create sustainable change at every level that doesn’t end with a single march or fundraiser. Our Mobilize Recovery project was spearheaded in 2018 by the Facebook Community Leadership Program and will build capacity for organized civic advocacy around the country. We will identify, train, connect, and work with recovery advocates in all 50 states. Each of these selected community organizers will have lived experience with substance use disorders. By sharing resources, coordinating our agenda, and taking action as a powerful, confident constituency, we will create change that affects millions of people in a positive way.

Population(s) Served
People who abuse drugs, alcohol, or other substances
Families
Budget
$150,000

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Total number of new organization members

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Mobilize Recovery

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of organizational partners

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Mobilize Recovery

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of new advocates recruited

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Mobilize Recovery

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of convenings hosted by the organization

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Mobilize Recovery

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of training events conducted

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Mobilize Recovery

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Charting impact

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

Recovery is a social justice issue: many of the problems that created and perpetuate drug-related deaths can be solved by policy change, education, and awareness-raising campaigns. The Voices Project coordinates those efforts to create a constituency of consequence that could be organized to support meaningful, life-saving policy. As a mobilized, community driven coalition, we can turn the tide of the epidemic and create sustainable change at every level that doesn’t end with a single march or fundraiser. Policy change is crucial to keeping the hard-won gains of trained, organized grassroots advocates who took to the front lines in the fight for equal access to recovery support, treatment, and other services. Addiction is a crisis of epidemic proportions and shows no sign of slowing down. It affects people of every race, class, social group, religion, and gender. It does not discriminate. Currently, 23 million Americans are in sustained recovery from substance use disorder. Another 22 million are suffering from this highly preventable, treatable illness. One in every three households includes a person with substance use disorder; beyond the home, the prevalence of addiction affects almost everyone. From healthcare systems overloaded with people desperate for help, to criminal justice courts crammed with people who need treatment instead of jail time, our society is burdened by the stigma of addiction. Without authentic community engagement, organization, and recovery advocacy, millions of people will never access the life-saving support they need. Currently, less than 10 percent of people ever seek medical help of any kind for their addiction. Yet, when the recovery community organizes, reform is possible. Advocates have successfully accessed funding for recovery supports, effective and ethical standards for treatment, and changes to employment processes.

The Voices Project’s scalable model builds capacity using several key strategies. Over time, we will build the necessary leadership, framework, and tools to establish a sustainable coalition in each state in the U.S. Our growth strategies: ● Identification and leadership training for lead organizers in every state ● Identification and training for (at least) one community leader per county in each U.S. state ● In person and digital community engagement trainings in each state with topics determined by community needs assessments to be conducted by state and community leads ● Community and state specific listening sessions for community leaders with local/state stakeholder groups ● State specific toolkit items developed using needs assessments/community listening sessions ● Development of state specific digital community engagement tools and a central hub for list building, contact management with decision makers, calls to action, and network communication in partnership with the stakeholder organizations ● Ongoing technical assistance to state and community leads for coalition building, recruitment, sustainability, fundraising, digital support, and communications ● Development of impact indicators specific to each state and systems for outcomes, measurements, and data collection to demonstrate community impact As the network grows, the initiative will add staff, offer more scholarships to advocates wishing to attend future Mobilize Recovery training events, utilize translators to improve access and cross language barriers, deepen its research into recovery tools and outcomes, increase the number of trainings and further diversify presenters, improve engagement, and get on an equal footing with groups in the same space.

Our 2018-2020 initial data included people who have worked in the recovery field for decades, as well as relative newcomers. The selection process was a key part of the initiative, and helped identify recovery advocates who were motivated to become community leaders. Hundreds of applicants who were not at Mobilize Recovery's inaugural convening participated via livestream. Returning home, participants were instructed to join a special closed Facebook group and continue attending follow-up sessions via Facebook Live. Participants were given the capability to connect with other advocates in their regions in order to create and coordinate recovery efforts at the local level. Facebook supported The Voices Project with an inaugural grant through its Community Leadership Program. Leveraging the support from Facebook, The Voices Project raised an additional $130,000 in donations to build staff, support the development of state and local coalitions, and create the framework for sustainable support and trainings. The main programmatic outputs included organizing the initial event, creating educational materials, and sharing the initiative’s goals with participants. Facebook groups and messaging tools enabled this output. For a new group of 185 people in 2019, this was the most efficient way to communicate needs and goals. We currently have network participants in all 50 states + Puerto Rico and the District of Columbia, conduct bi-monthly leadership calls and trainings, host the annual Mobilize Recovery convening for new leaders, and have built out a leadership and volunteer staff that is able to answer to the needs of our community leaders and members.

The Voices Project identifies main impact indicators as pro-recovery actions that include creating and sustaining recovery support services and recovery nonprofits, community engagement, adding to network membership, increasing media coverage, hosting recovery-related events, and partnering with employers and recovery-friendly corporations. Outcomes-level indicators that the initiative is working are declining rates of overdoses and substance-related deaths; an increase in the number of self-identified “recovery advocates,” higher community engagement for recovery-related issues; and increased recovery support services in communities. Because the initiative focuses on grassroots leadership, each of these impact indicators may look different based on the needs and desires of people in recovery in each area or region. What works in a high-income, heavily urbanized county in California may not be appropriate in a low-income, rural county in South Carolina. However, participants agree that basic recovery supports such as access to evidence-based treatment and naloxone are universally desirable; how those supports are implemented in different regions is incumbent upon local recovery advocates. While members may have identified interest in addiction as it relates to public health or criminal justice, they all share goals that are aligned with the overall goals of the initiative including efforts such as: ● Support harm reduction and overdose prevention ● Make naloxone available in every public place ● Improve access to evidence-based treatment ● Support medication-assisted therapy (MAT) ● Build coalitions, support advocates, and pilot new outreach programs The initial impact indicators for the initiative include, but are not limited to: ● Create and sustain recovery support services ● Support pro-recovery funding ● Grow coalition and add to network membership ● Increase media coverage around stigma reduction and recovery awareness ● Host recovery-related events ● Support local, emerging recovery nonprofits ● Partner with employers and recovery-friendly corporations

The inaugural Voices Project network group included people who have worked in the recovery field for decades, as well as relative newcomers. The selection process was a key part of the initiative, and helped identify recovery advocates who were motivated to become community leaders. Hundreds of applicants who were not at the conference participated via livestream. Returning home, participants were instructed to join a special closed Facebook group and continue attending follow-up sessions via Facebook Live. Participants were given the capability to connect with other advocates in their regions in order to create and coordinate recovery efforts at the local level. In 2019, The Voices Project selected 150 advocates from a pool of over 1,000 applicants from diverse regions, demographics, recovery pathways, and fields. For the initial roll-out, we focused on Nevada as a model for recovery advocacy and community mobilization. (Subsequent pilot programs have be initiated in the states of Indiana, North Carolina, Tennessee and Rhode Island.) The first Mobilize Recovery/Voices Project convening was held in Las Vegas, Nevada. This event’s outcome was positive and had a significant impact on recovery advocates and front-line responses to the drug epidemic. While it’s difficult to initially assess the full impact of The Voices Project, the initial response has been powerful. We believe that this impact will only increase over the next years and decades as the participants carry out their advocacy work and share the message of recovery with others. It is fair to assume that each leader reaches 50 people, each of those 50 people reach another 50, and so on. We continue to build and convene a network of advocates who can be mobilized to respond to recovery issues. We find that there is no “wrong way” to support recovery, though trained, organized advocates will get more from their efforts as they work in tandem with one another in a coordinated strategy. Moving forward, participants will be asked to self-report their progress as “social impact actions” that include all forms of advocacy work, from piloting new community initiatives, to attending town hall meetings, to organizing recovery rallies and events. They will also be asked to record the number of people directly affected by their work, such as the number of students at a recovery high school, the number of people who use a syringe exchange site, and the number of participants in a recovery 5K fundraiser. The Voices Project’s scalable model will build capacity over its next steps as it continues to host its annual Mobilize Recovery, regional and local events, develops capacity for increased training and recruitment, and measures it's long-term outcomes.

Financials

The Voices Project
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Operations

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This organization has no recorded board members.

Keywords

advocacy, mental health, addiction