PLATINUM2023

Secular Humanists of Western Lake Erie

Building Community Through Compassion and Reason for a Better Tomorrow

TOLEDO, OH   |  https://humanistswle.org

Mission

To provide a supportive local community for humanists and other nontheists, while promoting ethical and reasonable secular world views through education, community service, outreach, activism, and social events.

Ruling year info

1980

President

Douglas L Berger

Main address

PO Box 6433

TOLEDO, OH 43612 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

83-0911351

NTEE code info

Freedom of Religion Issues (R65)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990-N.

Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

There are literally dozens of houses of worship from any point in our area but there are no places dedicated specifically to cater to the non-religious. The Secular Humanists of Western Lake Erie want to be that group that caters to the under-served non-religious in Northwest Ohio. One major goal is to own and operate a Humanist House in the metro Toledo area. In the meantime we will address the lack of safe space in the best way we can using a combination of in-person meetings and events and regular communication through social media and use of a podcast outreach that started in January of 2020.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Monthly Meeting

We have general meetings at least one a month on a variety of topics that support our mission and philosophy.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Talking about Humanist values and social justice. Topics range from the Humanist consensus to how to navigate a world made up of science denying Christian Nationalists bent on smashing the wall between church and state. Human problems require human solutions.

Population(s) Served
Secular groups
Women and girls
Heterosexuals
LGBTQ people

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Total number of organization members

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Secular groups, LGBTQ people, Work status and occupations, Age groups, Families

Related Program

Monthly Meeting

Type of Metric

Other - describing something else

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

The pandemic hit harder in 2021 when we dropped to 12 paid members. We did even out for 2022 and even added more members than we lost

Number of donations made by board members

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Monthly Meeting

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Donations include time and money

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Providing a supportive local community for humanists and other nontheists, while promoting ethical and reasonable secular world views through education, community service, outreach, activism, and social events. Our goal is to do this through a combination of our own building/meeting space, monthly programing, and our podcast.

We have monthly general meetings that are free and open to the public. On occasion we have additional events during a month that are free or low cost and open to the public.

We also plan to have informational booths at select community events like Toledo Pride and The Old West End Autumn Market.

We also try to perform a service project coinciding with the Secular Week of Action.

We produce a podcast called "Glass City Humanist" as an outreach to the community that also conforms to the goals of the group with news and information of interest to Humanists and interviews of secular people on Humanist topics.

Although we are small, we are able to host at least one meeting a month and occasional additional public events such as our Humanist Nooner that meets for lunch at a local diner. We can also staff a booth at a community event. Our leadership is also available to network with other like minded groups to make a bigger impact when needed.

We've had monthly meetings with a variety of topics - some with invited speakers. We have had booths at Toledo Pride two years in a row and have generated interested leads from that.

We get press coverage of our events in the religion section of the Toledo Blade

Our podcast listener base is rising. As of January 2022, we have produced over 35 episodes and have 1800 downloads.

We are able to raise some small funds through fundraisers through Facebook and other avenues like Kroger Community Rewards and Amazon Smiles

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Financials

Secular Humanists of Western Lake Erie
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Secular Humanists of Western Lake Erie

Board of directors
as of 02/01/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Douglas Berger

Douglas Berger

Shawn Meagley

Edward Schaperjahn Jr.

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Not applicable
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 11/1/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person with a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 11/01/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.