Chicago Refugee Coalition

Relief, Revolutionized

CHICAGO, IL   |  chicagorefugee.org

Mission

The Chicago Refugee Coalition is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization dedicated to the alleviation of human suffering through innovative partnerships, responsive advocacy, and community empowerment.

Ruling year info

2018

Executive Director

Alisa Roadcup

Main address

6631 North Bosworth Avenue Room 107

CHICAGO, IL 60626 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

83-0977387

NTEE code info

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (P01)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990-N.

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

This profile needs more info.

If it is your nonprofit, add a problem overview.

Login and update

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Food Security Programming

Sponsored by Imperfect Foods, the Chicago Refugee Coalition has been operating a robust, and innovative, mobile food banking service since 2018. Each week, our organization brings in hundreds of pounds of fresh fruits and vegetables for distribution to enrolled refugee families. Since the program's inception, we have distributed an estimated 75,000 meals to the Chicagoland refugee community.

Additional outcomes from this program include (1) a 13% reduction in refugee high school drop out rates within our service population (2) a reported increase of household income elasticity by an average of 46% and (3) a 92% reduction in food insecurity among our service population.

Population(s) Served

The Chicago Refugee Coalition is proud to run the only refugee resource center directly integrated into a Chicago Public School. The rational for this innovative partnership was to breakdown barriers of access to basic goods provision and to establish ourselves as a "help desk" for the refugee community in a refugee-centric public school.

This center operates a robust clothing closet that (1) has distributed over 500 coats (2) distributed over 2,000 articles of winter garb (3) distributes over 10,000 pairs of news socks annually and (4) regularly distributes hundreds of bottles of shampoo, conditioner, body wash, etc. This center also provides free rugs, towels, bedding, and other critical household items for refugee families.

Population(s) Served

In collaboration with the social work staff and faculty, our organization's volunteers, interns, and personnel regularly cross-collaborate among teams to provide (1) financial literacy support (2) resume support (3) job application support (4) college application support and (5) FAFSA navigation support.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Awards

Excellence in Civic Engagement & Social Justice 2021

Loyola University Chicago

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of food donation partners

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Food Security Programming

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of children who receive new clothing

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Basic Needs Provision

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of health/hygiene product and/or tools of care (mosquito nets, soap, etc.) administered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Basic Needs Provision

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Please note that this figure is an estimated aggregated total of all hygiene product outputs via our resource center.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Community meetings/Town halls, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

Chicago Refugee Coalition
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Chicago Refugee Coalition

Board of directors
as of 5/2/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Ms. Jamia Jowers

Nhu Phan

Wiki Foundation

Eda Akyar

Columbia University

Hinsley Njila

Citi Bank

Signe Hansen

HomeChef

Purvi Patel

UNHCR

Esperance Gikundiro

Sahro Mukhtar

Katie Sonnefeldt

Jamia Jowers

Brenand Sodikoff

Hogsalt

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 04/01/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 04/01/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.