Assertive Kids Foundation

STATEN ISLAND, NY   |  http://assertivekids.org

Mission

Assertive Kids is a community organization dedicated to fostering assertiveness and well-being in kids and adults. We seek to teach individuals to be assertive instead of passive or aggressive through workshops, literature, and web presence. Our programs will help to bring awareness to the topic of ageism and aging. As assertive persons, we shall take part in sharing the responsibility for the well-being of our community by helping the homeless to be kept warm and fed, and thus reduce their suffering in simple ways. We shall brighten our neighborhoods by providing flowers to homeowners, public housing residents, and businesses in our area. We seek to fund studies related to epigenetics and pregnancy.

Notes from the nonprofit

We help underserved communities, including those comprised primarily of people of color. In 2021, we hope to get more of our programs up and running We consider our inaugural activities to have been a success, with over $70,000 worth of children's clothing provided to local families in these underserved communities between 2018 and 2021. Our efforts consisted of reaching out to our local community, soliciting donations of gently used childrens' clothing and clothing for adults that would fit larger children, especially boys. All of the clothing that was provided to recipients in the community were in-kind donations received at the community level. All of the recipients of the clothing have been listed on our website, with photos of the clothing, along with some photos of families who were comfortable having their children's pictures taken for our site. This information can be found at https://assertivekids.org/2020/10/21/clothing-donations-activity-report/

Ruling year info

2019

President

Donn Albano

Main address

PO BOX 20521

STATEN ISLAND, NY 10302 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

83-1106745

NTEE code info

Unknown (Z99)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990-N.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2020 and 2019.
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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Many families can't afford to clothe their children. Women are fleeing domestic violence with just the clothes on their kids' backs. Families have fled oppression, seeking a better life in the U.S. Homeless people have it rough. Every homeless person has a story; some are Veterans, others have aged out of the foster care system. Others became unemployed. COVID-19 did its damage as well. Many urban areas are blighted by trash. Our goal is to make the surroundings more pleasant. While development has provided jobs, as well as places for people to live, the local wildlife has suffered immensely, displaced by "Progress." Therapeutic Massage has proven efficacious. Still, there are not enough studies about the effectiveness with regard to specific health conditions. We need more data. Many children and adolescents commit suicide due to bullying. That must change. Ageism is an insidious form of bias, and exists at all socioeconomic levels. Many people are not even aware of this.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Homeless Assistance

Helping the homeless by providing food, clean clothing, and emergency blankets to protect against the cold.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people

Clothing donations were solicited from local members of the community to provide, at no cost, to disadvantaged children in low income areas. The majority of the children helped by this program were children in minority families. Children helped included those on Staten Island in Mariners Harbor and New Brighton predominantly, which are low income communities that have been heavily impacted by the Covid pandemic, along with several families in housing projects in Brooklyn and Dongan Hills, Staten Island.

Population(s) Served
American Indians
Multiracial people
People of African descent
People of Latin American descent
Children and youth

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of families who report they are supported in utilizing natural supports in their communities (e.g., family, friends, neighbors, churches, colleges, recreational services)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Multiracial people, People of African descent, People of Latin American descent, Children and youth, Adults

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Families who have needs that we cannot meet are referred to other organizations that serve those needs. The families that were provided this info did not always receive our services.

Pounds of clothing donated

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, American Indians, Multiracial people, People of African descent, People of Latin American descent

Related Program

Children's Clothing Donation Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The clothing that we have donated to children and families is measured in number of pieces, and not in pounds. The year by year results are estimated based on the donations provided.

Number of children who receive new clothing

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Multiracial people, People of African descent, People of Latin American descent

Related Program

Children's Clothing Donation Program

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The children to whom our clothing was directly donated, as shown on our Form 990EZ for 2019, and on our estimates for 2020

Number of children served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Children's Clothing Donation Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The number of children in the community receiving help from our charity includes those who were provided with clothing and assisted with finding necessary services such as food.

Estimated dollar value of clothing and household goods donations

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, People of African descent, People of Latin American descent, Multiracial people

Related Program

Children's Clothing Donation Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Nearly all of the donations received from FY 2019 and thus far in 2020 have been in-kind donations. The amounts for 2020 are estimated, and will increase.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The Assertive Kids Foundation seeks to address the issue of human suffering due to various causes.

We help families in need by providing kids' clothing to them. Every child should have clothes that fit, enough outfits so that they can walk without the shame and stigma of poverty.

We also aim to provide homeless people with care packages consisting of toiletries, socks, emergency blankets, hand warmers, and non-perishable energy bars. While this does not help long-term, it does help individuals to cope with hardships germane to their unique challenges for another day. Our goal is to ease their burden, if even just for a little while, in limited ways. We also  have a plan for an experimental living facility, which would be a long long-term means of addressing homelessness as a phenomenon.

Volunteers have also performed several neighborhood trash cleanups, both on heavily littered urban sidewalks and in NYC parks, where we've removed bags and bags of litter. We also plan to have our volunteers plant urban areas with flower seeds and bulbs, to help brighten blighted areas.
 
Assertive Kids Foundation also provides assistance to local wildlife whose habitats have been steadily decreasing in land area due to over-development.

Research studies for pregnant women, children with autism and ADHD, people suffering from opioid addiction, as well as veterans with PTSD are planned for the near future. We also intend to help people in these groups afford complementary medical care.

Once in-person schooling has resumed, Assertive Kids will be providing workshops for students in local schools. These workshops will focus on teaching kids about assertiveness, aggression, passivity, narcissism, and other topics that will better prepare them to handle bullying and toxic people. Helping to prepare kids to deal with others is essential. In contemporary society, we are educated in the sciences, we are educated in literature. However, we remain ignorant of how to navigate interpersonal relationships.

Some of the workshops will also focus on ageism, a very relevant topic for the day as our nation grows older.

Assertive Kids Foundation solicits clothing donations from the public for the kids clothing drive, and relies on volunteers to sort, catalog, and deliver the clothes to children in local NYC and NJ Metro Area communities.

We will be relying on donations from the local community in order to purchase the items for homeless people's care package items, and volunteers will assemble the packages. Additional volunteers will bring the care packages to local homeless individuals. As far as our "Last Resort Towers" plan, we would need a partner to help build a site to test the viability of this idea.

Volunteers will perform neighborhood cleanups, with beautification teams planting flowers and picking up garbage from parks and sidewalks in depressed areas. Volunteers will be provided with gloves and trash bags.

Local wildlife assistance helps primarily birds of all types and squirrels. High-quality edible seeds and nuts are placed in areas where animals can easily access them.

Research studies will be developed with local universities, and volunteer participants will be solicited. This will require monetary donations, as health  professionals participating in studies must be compensated. In lieu of monetary payment, participants will receive treatment free of cost.

The Foundation is also creating learning materials for our Assertiveness Workshops, utilizing the latest in research on sociology, psychology, and education. This strategy will aim at informing, and educating, workshop participants.

Our organization has been receiving references for children in need of clothing from other local charities in our area, including several religious charities. We will also be partnering with local businesses and individuals who will provide clothing to us for these disadvantaged children. We are also applying for many relevant grants that will help us to purchase the clothing for distribution.

Our organization has several capable volunteers who will be assembling the care packages for homeless people, and we will be working together with other charities, as well as other individuals in our local community who are familiar with their local homeless populations, in order to facilitate distribution of the care packages.

The staff members for Assertive Kids Foundation are themselves holistic healthcare practitioners, familiar with the benefits of many complementary medicine modalities. It is this experience that will be called upon to create and design the studies.

The workshops are being created by the president of the Foundation. The President has a background in learning, having tutored English-As-A-Second-Language (ESL) as well as students with Learning Differences at C.U.N.Y CSI's Learning Center for five years. The president also taught remedial level reading, writing, and speaking at CUNY, completed a concentration in Elementary Education, and worked as a Music Specialist in the NYC Board of Education.

Presentations at local schools will be made by multiple professionals, including other educators and experts on bullying, as well as people who have experienced bullying firsthand.

  In Fiscal Year 2020 (which ends in June of 2021), we have distributed close to $50,000 in clothing so far, as many members of the community provided us with in-kind donations for distribution. In Fiscal Year 2019, we distributed approximately $22,000 in clothing to local families.

    All of this was done by volunteers alone, sorting, cataloging, pricing, and distributing the clothing to local families, and all of this was accomplished with no direct monetary donations, from either individuals or businesses, and no non-profit organization grants.

    Recipients have included: children of refugees, disabled parents, low income parents, parents affected by the pandemic with job loss or income reduction, as well as members of local Native American tribes. Altogether, 30 children were helped in 2019.

    Out of these, 5 were in Mariner's Harbor, 12 were in New Brighton, 4 were in Arlington, 3 were in Elm Park, one was in the Dongan Hills Projects, one was in New Jersey, 2 were in Brooklyn Projects, 1 was in a Queens Project, and 1 was in Manhattan.

    Several of the children helped were finally receiving a permanent home after leaving a shelter, and one of them was previously in foster care and being returned to her birth mom.

    The ethnicity of the children were as follows: 14 were Black/African American, 4 were White/Caucasian, 11 were Hispanic.

    In addition to these individual families, Assertive Kids also donated chocolate bars and candy, as well as a Tofurky Vegetarian Feast, to several local food banks and food pantries on Staten Island, including Project Hospitality, Salvation Army, and the Seventh Day Adventist Church. These all serve disadvantaged local communities with fresh food on a weekly or more frequent basis. The Salvation Army received the Tofurky very happily, as they have a vegetarian family that comes for their annual Thanksgiving Dinner, and in 2019 they had a real Thanksgiving feast with a "turkey" and all the trimmings.

    In Fiscal Year 2020, an additional 70 children were helped, plus 5,000 members of a Native American tribe in New Jersey, an estimated 1,000 members of a local church that operates a “dress for success” program, and an estimated 500 members of a small church in Mariners Harbor.

    Of the individual children noted above, 39 or 55% were Black, 13 or 19% were Hispanic, 17 or 24% were White, 1 or 1.4% were Asian. The members of both churches are mostly Black and Hispanic, and the Lenape tribe members are Native American.

    We have begun researching the purchasing of supplies for the homeless population, and will continue to purchase further supplies with the donations that are received. Each Homeless Care package has an approximate cost of $20, and ideally we would like to distribute care packages for at least 10 or more homeless people in the local community.

    We have begun formulating the studies for pregnant populations. Participants have not yet been solicited as further contributions

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    SMS text surveys, Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To improve program efficiency,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Making it more convenient for the populations served to meet with people providing help from our organization. Several of the recipients have also provided information about members of the community in need of similar help from our organization, to whom we reached out and provided assistance.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners, With the public, on our website accomplishments pages,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection,

Financials

Assertive Kids Foundation
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Assertive Kids Foundation

Board of directors
as of 2/4/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Donn Albano

Assertive Kids Foundation


Board co-chair

Heather Miller

Assertive Kids Foundation

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Not applicable
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Not applicable
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Not applicable
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Not applicable
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Not applicable

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/3/2021,

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Decline to state
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 02/03/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.