Wanda Joyce Robinson Foundation

Frankfort, KY   |  http://wjrfoundation.org

Mission

It is the Mission of the Wanda Joyce Robinson Foundation to provide mentorship and resources to children, youth, and families impacted by incarceration. It is the Vision of the Wanda Joyce Robinson Foundation to end the cycle of incarceration by providing the children and youth that we serve with a path of hope and a vision of a successful future.

Notes from the nonprofit

The Wanda Joyce Robinson Foundation was founded October, 2018, by Dale Robinson, Amy Snow, and Krista Hudson. Dale Robinson, a former felon, had the vision to create a nonprofit that would provide support and mentorship to children of the incarcerated. Dale served ten years in federal prison, leaving his two sons behind. Dale credits the wraparound support system of positive role models and caring adults in his sons' lives as a significant factor for their current success. Dale believed other children and youth impacted by incarceration could be served through a non-profit. Dale envisioned naming the organization after his late mother, Wanda Joyce Robinson, as a way to honor her. The Wanda Joyce Robinson Foundation epitomizes a mother’s unconditional love and hope for her children...that along life’s journey, our sons and daughters learn to love, forgive, believe, and overcome.

Ruling year info

2018

Co-founder & President

Amy Snow

Vice President

Whitney Jennels

Main address

PO Box 4591

Frankfort, KY 40604 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

83-1861429

NTEE code info

Youth Development Programs (O50)

Services to Prisoners/Families (I43)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990-N.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Children of the incarcerated are more likely to experience mental health issues; substance use disorder; trauma; live in poverty; dropout from high school; are vulnerable to abuse and neglect; and are more likely to become incarcerated themselves. These issues grossly impact our community, as well as the economy. Research indicates that the human potential loss due to the achievement gap in school is equal to a national recession. Our youth are not prepared for adulthood because children can not be educated when their most basic needs are not met. The data is shocking. Kentucky’s incarceration rate is more than double the national average. That number represents 15%, (145,000), of Kentucky children. The impact on our community is devastating. The WJRF board believes that as a community we are called to do something about it. While parental incarceration is a “shared sentence” in terms of its impact on children, it most certainly does not have to be a generational sentence.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Contact and Video Visitation, Franklin County Regional Jail Literacy Program

WJRF hosts contact visitations at the Franklin County Regional Jail. Dale Robinson meets with inmates pre and post visits to discuss the realities of being a parent behind bars. WJRF volunteers provide games, books and the opportunity to take a family picture. Pizza, drinks and dessert are provided by FCRJ and WJRF. WJRF also provides support to families to travel to state and federal facilities.

Through a partnership with Global Tel Link Corporation, WJRF is able to provide free video visitation to children and youth in 10 counties in Kentucky.

Named by a prisoner, A Familiar Voice is a literacy initiative that was established in 2019. Two board members facilitate the program, which is sponsored though Paul Sawyier Public Library. Prisoners record themselves reading a book to their child. The book, recording and a book mark are mailed to the child.

Population(s) Served
Families

WJRF offers a $1000 scholarship to graduating seniors who are impacted by incarceration. To date, four students have received this scholarship.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents

Second Thursdays is a monthly support group for caregivers of children of the incarcerated, led by a licensed clinical social worker. WJRF volunteers provide child care and dinner for families. A local church provides transportation for families in need. This group meets monthly.

Population(s) Served
Caregivers

A quarterly event held in March, June, September, and December. Our families gather together for food and fellowship. Child and youth birthdays are celebrated. Over 400 individuals have attended our Family Fellowship events.

Population(s) Served
Families

WJRF provides college and career field trips, ACT prep classes, access to tutoring, job shadowing and life skills building opportunities. Dale and Taylor Robinson meet with groups of high school students monthly. Over 100 high school students were a part of this program in 2019.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents

OMAC is a prevention and intervention program for youth at-risk of becoming involved in the criminal justice system. WJRF contracts with OMAC founder Geo Gibson, to lead this program for local youth referred by the schools and court system.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents

WJRF assists with the payment of extra-curricular activities for children and youth. During 2019, 54 youth were sponsored in an after school and/or summer activity.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

KRUSH is a school-based weekly support group for student impacted by incarceration. It is a Kindergarten-12th grade curriculum that is aligned to state and national standards. WJRF paid for 39 Frankfort/Franklin County educators to attend KRUSH training. We provide $300 stipends to our local KRUSH groups. WJRF officially partnered with KRUSH LLC to provide training state-wide and beyond. As of August 2020, over 400 educators have been trained.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Amachi is a national mentoring program specifically designed for children of the incarcerated. Our board member oversees the implementation of this program, under the guidance of the board and Amachi of Central KY. Children/youth are matched with a one one one mentor for a minimum of 12 months.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Where we work

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The ultimate goal of WJRF is to break the cycle of generational incarceration and to reduce the number of Kentucky children impacted by incarceration. Our mission is to serve children and youth impacted by incarceration and we accomplish that through our twelve operational programs that align with our core focus areas: (1) Educate; (2) Connect; and (3) Prevent.

Our goal to EDUCATE children and youth includes building social-emotional health and college/career exploration. Emotionally strong youth are prepared to pursue their life goals as young adults.

We CONNECT with families by providing a supportive environment for caregivers and fellowship among all- felon and law enforcement; parent and social worker; child and mentor.

We PREVENT by mentoring at-risk youth and by providing concrete support in times of need to our families.

Our identified goals for our third year of origination include:
(1) Secure grant funding to hire full time staff.
(2) Hire a social worker(s); an Amachi mentoring program coordinator; and a KRUSH program coordinator.
(3) Explore avenues of sustainable funding.

The Wanda Joyce Robinson Foundation is led by a 27 member board comprised of professionals and representatives of the families we serve- They come from all walks of life and backgrounds to create a diverse and robust board of directors. Law enforcement and felon; successful business owner and school teacher; social worker and caretaker; volunteer and youth- all have a seat at the table, co-leading the direction of the Wanda Joyce Robinson Foundation. We truly believe that together, we are powerful and unified in our mission.

The foundation partners with schools, community agencies, and other non-profits to provide resources and services to children and families. WJRF has the unique capacity to “fill in the gaps” that macro-level services unintentionally create. WJRF represents “family”, as in total community- felon, child/youth, law enforcement, correctional system, school, mental health, government, and business. Within this family, WJRF provides mentorship for both prisoner and child; support to parents and caregivers; and connection to COMMUNITY. We believe in a holistic approach to breaking the generational cycle of incarceration. This is achieved through the commitment and dedication of the foundation volunteers and board of directors.

As we enter 2021, our board is focused on the hiring of full-time staff; the evaluation of our current programming; assessing the needs of our families; and the continued development of best practices for our foundation. We have ad hoc board committees dedicated to working in these identified core areas. We also have "mentoring" relationships with the Kentucky Cabinet of Community Based Services and other peer organizations who guide and assist us as we move forward.

WJRF has formed strong partnerships with organizations and institutions throughout the Commonwealth of Kentucky. WJRF will continue to work with our partners to develop improved outreach to the Frankfort, Franklin County and surrounding communities. WJRF will continue to assess the needs of our families and community, as well as opportunities for betterment.

One of Wanda Joyce Robinson Foundation’s greatest strengths is our board. We are a diverse group of individuals composed of men and women of all socio-economic backgrounds, races, and sexual orientation. We are professionals in the career fields of law enforcement, social services, public and independent schools, mental health, juvenile justice, and courthouse personnel. Perhaps most importantly, we have representatives from the children and families we serve.

Our co-founder, Dale Robinson, is a former felon and parent, who can relate with the incarcerated fathers and mothers we encounter. This is an intangible asset when building relationships and trust among the families we serve. Dale is also a sought-after motivational speaker, who has gained a national platform, spotlighting WJRF.

We are embedded in our community. We do not envision brick and mortar costs. Our office space is in The Kings Center. We use multiple community and business meeting areas to meet with our children and families. We have relationships with Franklin County Schools, Frankfort Independent Schools, Franklin County Department of Community Based Services; Frankfort Police Department; Franklin County Sheriff’s Office; and Franklin County Regional Jail.

Peer organizations including Franklin County Agency for Substance Abuse Treatment, YES Arts, The Pavilion Foundation, The Sunshine Center, Bluegrass Care Navigators, The Kings Center, and Amachi of Central Kentucky have provided ongoing support to us. Civic organizations including the Kiwanis Club and a variety of churches have reached out to us, hosting us as guest speakers for their programs and reciprocaly, have volunteered at our events. We have partnerships with Frankfort Martial Arts, Frankfort Parks and Recreation, Capital City Dance, and GEMCats to provide extracurricular activities for our children.

We have accounting software, Quickbooks Intuit, to manage our finances. We have a certified public accountant, Harrod and Associates, a bookkeeper, and board treasurer. We utilize the Greater Giving software for our auction sales. We have a finance committee and board approved policies to oversee our financial assets.

Our Innovative Mentoring Solutions software allows us to keep a database of all the children and families we serve. We are able to run reports and see data on our kids. We are able to keep case notes. We can also communicate directly through a text messaging system as well as email through our software.

Many of our board members and volunteers have a personal connection to our cause. Our mental health representative is 27 years sober and was an incarcerated mother. A social worker oversees our Amachi mentoring program. A masters level social worker is our direct contact to families, when children and youth are referred. A licensed clinical counselor leads our monthly caregiver support group. We truly believe we have the "right people" guiding the direction of WJRF.

In 2019, our data was incredible. 285+ children and youth served; a wide range of programming that included numerous community partnerships; the launch of a state-wide training for educators; and capacity building with our Americorps VISTA are just a few of the many highlights.

During 2020, despite Covid, our board continued to meet virtually each month. We established additional resources and partnerships with a mental health provider and Kentucky State University. The board participated in a strategic planning process and approved our first plan, in October.

We envision the Wanda Joyce Robinson Foundation as a premiere non-profit serving thousands of children and youth throughout Kentucky and beyond. We anticipate securing grant funding for staff positions in 2021. Our vision is to hire a full time social worker(s), an Amachi program coordinator, and a KRUSH program coordinator. Our Adam Hyatt Memorial Scholarship committee is currently exploring ways to further develop the support we provide to our young adults. Our partnership with KRUSH, LLC, encompasses training for educators, nationally.

Our mission to serve children and youth impacted by incarceration is pure and steadfast. We are willing to do whatever it takes to break the cycle of generational incarceration and to provide a path of hope and a vision of a successful future for the families we serve.

Financials

Wanda Joyce Robinson Foundation
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Wanda Joyce Robinson Foundation

Board of directors
as of 4/13/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Amy Snow


Board co-chair

Whitney Jennels

Amy Snow

Co-Founder, Franklin County Schools

Kim Beers

Franklin County Schools

Rebecca Redding

Kentucky Monthly Magazine

Margaret O'Donnell

Attorney at Law

Whitney Jennels

Parent/Caregiver Representative

Meagan Morrow

Franklin Count Schools

Dale Robinson

Co-Founder, GURU Gym

Maria Pearl

EveryDay Matters, LLC

Kalissa Yates

Kentucky State University

Dustin Bowman

Frankfort Police Department

Bailey Slucher

Paul Sawyier Public Library

Gregg Muravchick

law enforcement

Kevin Hocker

Department of Juvenile Justice

Debbie Moore

Franklin County Schools

Krystal Conway-Cunningham

Frankfort Independent Schools

Tisa Conway-Cunningham

Frankfort Independent Schools

Shelley Hearn

Social Worker

Taylor Robinson

Issa Wright

Administrative Office of the Courts

Wil Rhodes

Kings Center Representative

Jonathan Scott

Ashley Mulder

Franklin County Regional Jail

LaQuida Smith

Kentucky State University

Dinah Walker

Self Care Solutions

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 10/23/2020

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American/African
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data