PLATINUM2023

Madison Community Cats

aka MAD Cats   |   SYRIA, VA   |  http://www.madisoncommunitycats.org

Mission

Our purpose is to improve the lives of community cats in Madison and Culpeper Counties, Virginia, We operate a Trap-Neuter-Vaccinate-Return (TNVR) program, the globally recognized humane approach, to reduce shelter intake and euthanasia of cats, prevent unwanted litters of kittens and stabilize existing cat colonies. Stray, feral or colony cats are trapped, S/N, vaccinated, dewormed and returned to their owners/caregivers. In 2020, we added a domestic cat spay/neuter program and monthly food support to our colony caregivers.

Notes from the nonprofit

We are a very small non-profit, all volunteer, no paid staff, with a working Board of Directors. Many of the questions in this assessment are more relevant to larger organizations with professional boards, paid staff, and much larger pools of volunteers. Nevertheless, we have always made it a priority to be totally transparent in all of our programs, operations and financial documents. We are dealing with clients who have cats and in situations that are sometimes difficult to witness, whether pertaining to the clients, their animals, or both. It is paramount that we are always professional, empathetic and nonjudgmental. We are kind. We are there to help the cats - recognizing that clients may be defensive and we need to establish a connection that will encourage them to be frank with us about the situation. We stay in touch with many of our clients - setting them up for our monthly food delivery program - we are not only checking up on the cats, but the clients too.

Ruling year info

2018

Director

Laurie K Counts

Main address

53 ROBINSON LN

SYRIA, VA 22743 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

83-2073006

NTEE code info

Animal Related Activities N.E.C. (D99)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

MAD Cats is working to reduce and stabilize the over-population of cats in our region that covers Culpeper, Madison and recently parts of Greene County Virginia. Trap/Neuter/Return (TNR) is the globally recognized humane method of reducing cat populations, and is our largest and most heavily funded program. By reducing and stabilizing cat populations we keep healthy cats from being surrendered to shelters thereby lowering the euthanasia rate. In the time since MAD Cats organized in 2018, we have significantly impacted the number of cats being surrendered to our local shelters and reduced the euthanasia rate. Both Culpeper and Madison County shelters are now in reach of "no-kill" status which we hope to achieve in 2023.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Trap/Neuter/Return

TNR is a globally recognized program to reduce and stabilize community cat populations by spaying/neutering and vaccinating colony and owned cats living outdoors.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Seniors

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

Virginia Federation of Humane Societies 2023

Kitten College, Member Shelter and Rescues 2022

Neighborhood Cats, TNR certificates 2021

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of animal adoptions

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Caregivers, Economically disadvantaged people, Farmers, Unemployed people

Related Program

Trap/Neuter/Return

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

2020, only 5 months of records available

Number of animals rescued

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people, Military personnel, Retired people, Unemployed people, Domestic workers

Related Program

Trap/Neuter/Return

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

2020, partial year, 5 months

Number of animals spayed and neutered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people, Retired people, Unemployed people, Farmers, Domestic workers

Related Program

Trap/Neuter/Return

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Average cost per spay/neuter surgery

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people, Domestic workers, Farmers, Retired people, Unemployed people

Related Program

Trap/Neuter/Return

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Total pounds of pet food and litter distributed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people, Retired people, Farmers, Unemployed people, Domestic workers

Related Program

Trap/Neuter/Return

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Cat food only, no litter

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our goal is to reduce the number of cats surrendered/euthanized at local shelters by offering no-cost spay neuter services to colony caretakers and owners of domestic cats. Our domestic cat program grew out of our realization that in our rural area - owned domestic cats are likely to live as indoor/outdoor pets and reproduce as freely as unowned cats.
To address the needs of cats/kittens already in the local population, we have a Rescue/Foster/Adoption program for kittens and young adult cats that are candidates for adoption as pets. Depending on our volunteer resources, we either adopt the kittens directly from our foster homes, or transfer S/N, vaccinated and socialized kittens to larger more urban rescues for adoption. We are working to recruit sufficient volunteers to be able to have our own full-time program.
Another issue with our local population is that the majority of people willing to be caretakers for colonies of cats are generally older, retired, disabled, unemployed - or any mix of these. To meet that need, we established a monthly food distribution program. This is open to any caretaker whose cats have been through our TNR program. We are typically distributing 325# of food/month.

Many small rescues, such as ours for cats - do not survive past 5 years, or the original founding board of directors. We are a working board of 5, with 3 of us well into our 70's. In order to have our organization survive we recognize that we must put a plan in place now.

Serving rural areas as a foster-based rescue has its challenges. Our volunteers are spread over 3 counties, our foster homes are far apart, making adoptions difficult. We have no home base. We are not affiliated with the local animal shelters and we need more volunteers. In addition, we aren't sustainable even year-to-year without major fundraising efforts.

What we do have going for us is that our "cat" community is growing larger every year - by leaps and bounds. A recent fundraiser showed us the extent of their engagement when we were able to raise more than $30,000, from individual donors, to purchase a transport vehicle. We have an excellent reputation, not only with our clients, but also with our fellow rescue organizations. Our passion for cat rescue is genuine and the public knows that.

Our strategies for the next 2 -5 years are:
1. Develop relationships and shared goals with the 2 public shelters in our region.
2. Continue to nuture relationships with other rescues and find more ways to work together.
3. Continue to participate in community events and activities that provide educational opportunities for the
public on the importance of spaying/neuter and the role it plays in keeping cats out of shelters.
3. Develop a financial plan for the future.




Our strategies

1. Develop relationships with Culpeper and Madison County shelters. A couple of our Board members and key volunteers have excellent communication skills acquired during their life before retiring. Those skills along with our track record will be helpful in establishing strong relationships with the shelters. In addition, we recognize the need to get the buy in from local governing boards and have planned presentations to that effect.

2. Relationships with other rescues. This is a work in progress, one that we are expanding as we go by initiating conversations about how we can be helpful working with each of them whether it is on the rescue side, the trapping side or the adoption program.

3. Financial plans. Two of our BOD have strong financial backgrounds and are already working on long-term sustainability planning.

1. Develop relationships with Culpeper and Madison County shelters.
Over the past several years we have taken kittens from the Culpeper Shelter and have a good working relationship. To build on that, we would like to see the shelter's Animal Control Officers respond to cats that need immediate intervention - hit by car, pregnant cat living in storm drain, injured cats, kitten spotted on side of road. At this time, ACO's only respond in instances where dog intervention is required. Currently it is up to local rescue groups to care for cats//kittens that need help.
With the Madison County shelter we are just beginning to open up a dialog. It will be more difficult because the County government is not sympathetic to issues of stray cats and generally just pass on our name to citizens that need assistance. With the hiring of a shelter manager, even though it is only 26 hours per week - we are actively working to set up a meeting with her.
2. Relationships with other rescues. Over the past 2 years we have worked on developing strong mutual relations with other rescues. We have a local alliance for TNR with 4 other rescues - we have partner rescues that take our S/N kittens into their adoption programs, an we have partnered with High-volume Spay/Neuter clinics to ensure that we will have available appointments 52 weeks of the year.
3. Financial plans. Three of our board members have pledged to make MAD Cats a beneficiary of their estate planning. We have

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Financials

Madison Community Cats
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Madison Community Cats

Board of directors
as of 03/17/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

CMDR Gary Misch

Retired, USN, Commander

Term: 2018 - 2022

Laurie Counts

MAD Cats

Patricia Thompson

Retired

Sharon Benson

Retired

Kelly Kelley

Retired

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Not applicable
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Not applicable
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Not applicable
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 3/16/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Decline to state
Gender identity
Female
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

Transgender Identity

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data