Farming Hope

When we started Farming Hope, we began working alongside folks still unhoused, and those who had made it out. The common theme was that everyone who “got out” was given responsibility and ownership at the support organizations they worked with. We called this universal principle the “need to be needed.” We mean it when we say: You are needed to build this change.

aka Farming Hope   |   San Francisco, CA   |  http://www.farminghope.org

Mission

Together we empower folks experiencing major barriers to employment to grow and cook food to sustain themselves and their communities.

Ruling year info

1988

Executive Director

Jamie Stark

Main address

1600 Bryant St Unit 410537

San Francisco, CA 94141 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

83-2393341

NTEE code info

Employment Procurement Assistance and Job Training (J20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is not required to file an annual return with the IRS because it is a church.

Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Sadly, one of every 100 San Franciscans are homeless, according to the 2019 Point-in-Time Count. 25% of those folks report job loss as the cause of their homelessness. The Prison Policy Initiative measures that the unemployment rate for formerly incarcerated people is five times higher than unemployment for the general U.S. population. Most direct services focus on basic needs. Farming Hope fills the essential gap of transitional employment and training to build self-sustainability and the support network needed to maintain it. Ultimately, Farming Hope addresses the problem we call “the need to be needed” among formerly incarcerated and homeless adults. Those who find stability are given responsibility and ownership at their support organizations. In other words, being needed is a path up. To weave back the social fabric of our communities, ripped apart by years of inequality and racism, we begin by including everyone in the recovery, building spaces where everyone feels needed.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Culinary and Garden Training

Farming Hope runs community kitchens and a training garden in San Francisco. We offer part-time, transitional employment in kitchen and garden work shifts. Our team produces high-quality food and offers on-the-job training during our 12-week Apprenticeships. Therefore our referral and interview process is meant to identify those who will contribute to a high-functioning team while transitioning to their own long-term employment goals. At Farming Hope we search for candidates who are ready and willing to work but facing major barriers to employment; we search for candidates who truthfully desire to launch into further employment after graduation from our three-month program.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
Adults
Incarcerated people
Low-income people
Unemployed people

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of clients who complete job skills training

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Incarcerated people, Homeless people, Low-income people, Unemployed people

Related Program

Culinary and Garden Training

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of people within the organization's service area accessing food aid

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Low-income people, Homeless people, Unemployed people, Emergency responders, Victims of disaster

Related Program

Culinary and Garden Training

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of emergency meals provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Victims of disaster, Economically disadvantaged people, Homeless people, Parents

Related Program

Culinary and Garden Training

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

1. Secure our Business Model:

We are successfully managing two business arms and our overall organization. We have significant understanding of the “competitors” like private caterers and other CBOs offering contract meals, as well as our competitive advantages: quality food, social mission, customer-centric delivery logistics, professional communication, and competitive pricing. We believe in creating a secure and scalable 3-5 year business plan that relies on the economy of the market rather than the economy of community partnerships. Also on the business side, we plan to grow our Community Meals program to become a major contributor to reducing hunger through nutritious meals, even pathways to employment for some of our diners. We wish to pursue a culture of long-term staff commitment and organizational sustainability to mitigate the high turnover rate of the nonprofit sector. And we wish to more thoroughly document HR processes for faster staff onboarding and organizational scalability.

2.Deepen our Program Impact:
Now more than ever our Apprenticeships are in demand. We negotiated a lease and began fundraising as we opened our second permanent location, called Refettorio San Francisco. To run successful Apprenticeships in this new location, we must double down on program impact by:

Enhancing more holistic programming
Advancing impact measurement
Expanding Apprenticeships and staff

3. Expand our Reach
2021
16 Apprentices trained
70% retain job at six months post-graduation
60,000 meals cooked for food insecure neighbors
10,000 pounds of food rescued (diverted food waste)

2022
30 Apprentices trained
80% retain job at six months post-graduation
90,000 meals cooked for food insecure neighbors
100 daily Refettorio guests (families experiencing homelessness)
15,000 pounds of food rescued

2023
40 Apprentices graduate
85% retain job at six months post-graduation
125,000 meals cooked for food insecure neighbors
100 daily Refettorio guests (families experiencing homelessness)
25,000 pounds of food rescued

Through these activities, we strive to help our Apprentices feel needed and gain the confidence to provide that same feeling to others. Ultimately, we want Apprentices to:

...feel loved and respected by their neighbors.
...achieve stable full-time employment at a living wage.
… be empowered to show others what it means to have a healthy body and soul.

Within three years, the Board, staff, and advisors plan to finalize and begin executing a strategy that allows us to scale through direct partnership with like-minded food justice organizations. We are considering doing this through a new foundation, which would directly help local leaders already attempting to start similar social enterprise kitchens in California. These plans to scale are noticeably advanced by our growing partnership with international NGO Food For Soul, their brand and their network. We believe this model of scaling would be significantly less “colonial” or imposed from outside the community than franchising; instead, it would offer resources and solidarity with existing leaders and local need, within our wheelhouse of food and jobs.

Farming Hope works within a diverse ecosystem of support services and partners to guide our Apprentices on their road to resilience. Our program staff work with Apprentices’ Referral Partners to make sure they get the most out of our 12-week transitional employment program. Both the Referral Partners and the Apprentices remain an integral part of the Farming Hope community long after their Apprenticeship is over. Each component of this ecosystem is indispensable in helping us execute our Theory of Change through providing our Apprentices with:

… on-the-job paid culinary training in our kitchens.
… garden training in our community garden.
… opportunities to feed it forward by cooking for our food insecure neighbors.
… culinary, professional, and life skill courses.
... inclusive community meals and events.

We define and measure success by both outputs and outcomes. Key outputs include:

1. Numbers of people trained
In 2020, we hired and trained 13 Apprentices, 11 of whom completed the full 12-week program.
2. Graduation and employment rates.
84% of our apprentices graduated in 2020. 90% of graduates obtained employment by graduation. All were housed at time of program departure thanks primarily to referral partners’ wraparound services and Apprentices’ own efforts.
3. Number of people served meals.
In 2020, we fed 53,367 San Franciscans experiencing food insecurity through our Community Meals program.

We define outcomes as measures of transformational impact that result from successful activities and outputs. Key outcomes include:
1. Grade improvement in Jobs Readiness Assessments.
Our goal is that Apprentices improve at least 30% from their first to their last JRA. In 2020, 80% of Apprentices improved by more than 30%.

Financials

Farming Hope
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Farming Hope

Board of directors
as of 3/16/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Lyndsey Boucherle

Better Ventures

Term: 2020 - 2022


Board co-chair

Shelley Dyer

Tenderloin Neighborhood Development Corporation

Term: 2020 - 2022

Terri-Lee Dayal

Hims

Michael Fu

Hazel Health, Inc.

Lucia Pohlman

HIP Investor

Xochitl Hernandez

Fair Trade

Sheena Jain

Possible SF

Ilana Lipsett

Institute for the Future

Savannah Schoelen

Downtown Streets Team

Salim Zymet

50+1 Strategies

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 03/10/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data