PLATINUM2023

Center for A Humane Economy Inc

Helping Animals Helps Us All

Bethesda, MD   |  http://centerforahumaneeconomy.org

Mission

The Center for a Humane Economy is a Washington, D.C.-based 501(c)(3) charitable nonprofit organization that focuses on influencing the conduct of corporations to forge a humane economic order. The first organization of its kind in the animal protection movement, the Center encourages businesses to honor their social responsibilities in a culture where consumers, investors, and other key stakeholders abhor cruelty and the degradation of the environment and embrace innovation as a means of eliminating both. Corporations affect the lives and habitats of billions of animals annually. The Center has evaluated a number of industries to determine those with negative or, in some cases, positive impacts on the welfare of animals.

Ruling year info

2019

President

Wayne Pacelle

Main address

P.O. Box 30845

Bethesda, MD 20824 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Karner Blue Center for a Humane Economy, Inc.

EIN

83-2620507

NTEE code info

Research Institutes and/or Public Policy Analysis (D05)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2022, 2020 and 2019.
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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

We are working to end systemic abuse and cruelty to animals found broadly across the United States corporate landscape.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Kangaroos Are Not Shoes!

Kangaroos Are Not Shoes is a campaign with a single goal: secure a commitment from athletic shoe companies to rid their supply chains of kangaroo skins. We are working to stop the world’s sportswear companies from driving the biggest slaughter of land-based wildlife on the planet by using kangaroo skin in their products. Over two million kangaroos and 500,000 of their babies are slaughtered annually.

Nike, Adidas, Puma and other companies sell some 64 models of kangaroo skin soccer shoes, creating the demand that drives the commercial killing of these iconic marsupials. Recently, , Puma announced it would no longer be using kangaroo leather. This announcement was shortly followed by Nike’s similar statement. It makes sense as both these companies already developed and use synthetic knit, mesh and even fake “k-leather” fabrics in their most popular lines of soccer shoes. We are still waiting for Adidas, and others like New Balance, Mizuna, and Lotto to follow suit.

Population(s) Served
Activists
Adults
Academics
Children and youth

We are working to end mink farming for fur — an industry that causes immense suffering to mink and poses major animal and human health threats because of the unique susceptibility of factory-farmed mink to SARS-CoV-2.

Until the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, American mink (Neovison vison) had been housed on factory farms for their dense, luxurious pelts in 36 countries, including the United States and Canada. About 90% of milk pelts produced in North America are exported to China, where they clothe a wealthy elite. There are three intertwined and important rationales to the effort to ban mink farming in the U.S.:

1. Mink farming is a serious and unpredictable zoonotic hazard and an animal health catastrophe.
2. Mink farming is a chimera of all the worst elements of animal exploitation and abuse.
3. Farmed captive mink are invasive and injurious to wildlife and the natural environment.

Population(s) Served

We are working toward a national policy to ban gestation crates on pig farms and small cages at laying hen facilities.

Many breeding pigs and laying hens are confined in cages that barely allow the animals to move more than a few inches. Animals built to move should be allowed to move, and this kind of extreme confinement is inhumane, producing adverse psychological and physical effects for the animals conscripted into food production for humanity.

So far dozens of major food retailers including Safeway, McDonald’s and Subway have pledged to phase out the use of pork or eggs from producers who confine sows in gestation crates by 2022 or laying hens in cages by 2025.

Alternatives such as electronic sow feeding systems and pasture-based operations for laying hens provide better living environments than cages or crates. Food retailers that do not meet high standards for living environments risk compromising their reputation and the public’s trust.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Farmers
Activists

Cockfighting is one of the biggest underground animal-use industries in the United States, with fighting birds raised on an agricultural scale. There are millions of fighting birds in the U.S., thousands of cockfighting “farms,” and perhaps hundreds of pits and arenas, with U.S.-based cockfighters acting as the breeding ground for the global industry. In cockfights, handlers attach sharp knives or curved icepicks (called “gaffs”) to roosters’ legs, weapons intended to enhance the bloodletting and maim or kill the birds conscripted into the pit to fight. Animal fighting is one of the most gruesome forms of animal exploitation, with the animals hacked up for the mere pleasure and wagering by handlers and spectators. Cockfighting is a global enterprise, conducted from Mexico to Manilla.

Population(s) Served

We are working to end an archaic and wasteful milk mandate in the National School Lunch Program and to give kids a plant-based choice that delivers comparable nutrition without making them ill.

The National School Lunch Program has a "milk mandate" for children who qualify for the nutrition assistance program (30 million kids are provided with lunch, and 15 million with breakfast). The problem is, millions of kids who participate in the program are lactose intolerant, and dairy milk makes them sick, causing many of them to throw the milk away or to drink it and risk illness. Kids need a choice, and soymilk has been recognized under the American Dietary Guidelines. Soy is one of the biggest agricultural sectors in the U.S., with more than 500,000 farmers who'd like to see their product offered in the schools.

This program will also benefit dairy cows by reducing the demand for milk.

Population(s) Served
Activists
Adults
Activists
Adults
Activists
Adults
Children and youth
Parents
At-risk youth

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of undercover investigations/videos to uncover unethical treatment of animals

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Activists

Related Program

End Cockfighting

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

We partnered with another animal protection group with the capability to conduct drone investigations of ongoing cockfighting operations in Kentucky, Delaware, Mississippi, Tennessee, and Alabama

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our overall goal is to influence the conduct of corporations to forge a humane economic order.

Strategies for bringing about a more humane economic order include:
1. Developing specific and practical measures for companies to track and normalize animal welfare practices
internally.​
2. Analyzing business practices across animal impact industries and issuing white papers on their overall
performance on animal welfare.​
3. Highlighting innovators and companies leading their field in alternatives to animal use.​
4. Inspiring and educating the public about significant corporate impacts on animal welfare.
5. Partnering with companies to transition from harmful to humane animal practices.
6. Supporting laws and regulations that improve the welfare of animals in captivity and in the wild.
7. Using research and partnerships to lead campaigns on a number of corporate animal welfare issues.​

We have approximately 150,000 direct supporters that we engage and educate through email and/or all major social media platforms. We also send press releases and conduct press conferences and podcasts on a national level. In addition, we have created a consortium of other like-minded nonprofit and advocacy organizations to increase the sphere of influence for each of our main issues.

1. FDA Modernization. Working with our partner organization, Animal Wellness Action, we passed legislation that removed the decades old requirement that all new drugs be tested on animals. This will save thousands of laboratory animals (beagles, monkeys, etc.) and will expedite the release of life-saving drugs to the marketplace.

2. Big Cat Safety Act. We supported and helped pass the Big Cat Public Safety Act, which shut down roadside tiger-petting operations and keeps tigers, lions, leopards, etc., out of the hands of individuals and exotic pet dealers without the expertise or desire to provide a humane, safe, and nourishing environment for the animal.

3. Kangaroos are Not Shoes. Conducted a successful campaign to educate the athletic shoe manufacturers and their customers about the commercial killing in Australia of roughly two million wild kangaroos annually — mainly to manufacture soccer cleats. To date, Nike, Adidas, Puma, and others have either ceased to use kangaroo skins or are phasing them out.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Financials

Center for A Humane Economy Inc
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Center for A Humane Economy Inc

Board of directors
as of 08/08/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Ms. Muriel Van Housen

Retired

Sherry Kellett

Retired

Gerard Boss

Medical doctor

Cynthia Griffin

Diplomat

Marian Probst

Retired

Rene Tatro

Attorney

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Not applicable
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 6/3/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

Transgender Identity

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 08/08/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.