Deecilla Comfort Center

Changing Lives One Day At A Time

Avondale, AZ   |  www.deecillacenter.org

Mission

A place of refugee for our neighbors in search of restoration and healing from the storms of Domestic Violence, Sexual Assault, and Human Trafficking

Ruling year info

2019

Founder and CEO

Shawanda R. Randolph

Main address

12725 W Indian School Road Suite E101

Avondale, AZ 85392 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

83-2838595

NTEE code info

Victims' Services (P62)

Other Housing, Shelter N.E.C. (L99)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990-N.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

DeeCilla Comfort Center was established in 2018 to confront sexual assault, domestic violence, and human trafficking in our community: societal issues that often cripple people from reaching their maximum potential and making meaningful contributions to society. We work tirelessly and faithfully to fulfill our mission of providing services to survivors and bridging resources in the local community to aid in the fight against these traumatizing issues. Our area is lacking in both resources for immediate awareness to aid in prevention, as well as, support for victims to include access to housing, workforce development programs, and other tools to help in safety and recovery care.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Crisis Intervention Services

Provide recovery care support services, such as support groups and counseling to aid survivors with healing from trauma and loss.

Population(s) Served
Victims and oppressed people
Economically disadvantaged people

Provides affordable temporary housing for survivors

Population(s) Served
Victims and oppressed people
Economically disadvantaged people

Provides basic necessities to support at-risk persons and families

Population(s) Served
Women and girls
Economically disadvantaged people
Victims and oppressed people

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of youth and families for whom a cultural inventory (e.g., cultural/ethnic identity, language, values, spiritual life, family traditions, gender and sexual identity issues, other relevant preferences, etc.) is completed and used to develop the treatment and support plan

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls, Children and youth, Adults

Related Program

Crisis Intervention Services

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of Facebook followers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people, Victims and oppressed people

Type of Metric

Other - describing something else

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of clients assisted with legal needs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Victims and oppressed people

Related Program

Crisis Intervention Services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of youth mentored

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents, Young adults

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of people who received presentations on healthy relationships

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) is a significant health issue with considerable societal costs, resulting in survivors experiencing issues such as mental health problems (depression and PTSD), and cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, reproductive, musculoskeletal, and nervous system conditions which are chronic in nature. These survivors are also more likely to engage in high risk health behaviors such as smoking, binge drinking, and HIV risk behaviors. According to the Center for Disease Control (CDC), “the lifetime economic cost associated with medical services for IPV-related injuries, lost productivity from paid work, criminal justice and other cost was $3.6 trillion (2014 US dollars). The Lifetime per-victim cost was $103,767 for women and $23,414 for men.”

In Arizona, housing continues to be the most urgent need for survivors, with 223 requests for housing services unmet on a single day in 2015 (NNEDV, 2015). The lack of available housing provides the means for re-victimization, which in 2017, 90 reported people lost their lives due to domestic violence in Arizona, 63% were female. As of 15 April 2019, there were 33 domestic violence-related deaths reported according to Arizona Coalition to End Sexual & Domestic Violence (ACESDV.ORG). These are only the tracked are reported cases.

The process for individuals in IPV, DeeCilla Comfort Center aims to bridge the gap between identifying the need for help and obtaining help. The center will provide basic needs for IPV, SV, and trafficking survivors with specialized services for youth and young adults 16-28. We will provide both support and intervention program services to prevent revictimization and promote the prevention of IPV, SV, and trafficking.

Our centers will be in our local area, which is missing centralized and collocated resources, and provide an environment with community partnership support to help survivors understand that a community is behind their healing. It is essential for survivors to feel a genuine sense of community and support in their process. The support provided empowers and encourages the healing process and road to independence and healthy living while working with clients to achieve personal goals.

The development of the center is in response to the needs of the community. If DeeCilla Comfort Center Resource Center is not implemented, this community remains at a higher risk. Lack of accessible resources places victims back in dangerous situations, therefore never fully gaining the ability to receive what they needed to start over. Victims remain vulnerable and at risk of increased sexual and domestic violence victimization, which may lead to homelessness and fatalities.

We plan to accomplish our goals through a three-part integrated process.

• Our established Co-operative Resource Center - The DeeCilla Comfort Center coop resource center combines the strengths and resources of agencies across the “valley” to fight domestic and sexual violence and human trafficking. The Community Resource Center aims to provide integrative services and programs to include access to emergency shelters, professional counseling, legal advocacy, food distribution, housing/rental assistance and recovery programs to support the needs of the general community, especially victims of abuse, to promote a healthy and holistic community.

- Establishing three transitional homes for survivors of domestic and sexual violence, and human trafficking. These transitional homes with established programs operated through a collaborative community partnership approach would provide safety and security for survivors to start over based on their set goals. We understand the issues we wish to help our neighbors through do not affect one demographic, therefore we aim to establish three separate facilities with programs focused on the needs of each specific population (single men, single women, and single parents and children).

• Collaborative community outreach focusing on filling gaps in both the needs of the community and agency partners to provide maximum impact for our community. Through collaborative outreach DCC partners with community partners sharing similar missions to provide tools and resources to target specific audiences equipping them in the fight against domestic and sexual violence and human trafficking.

Our expertise and background in Hospital Administration, Medical Management, Social Work, Counseling, Ministry, and Community Outreach, as well as our local partnerships with agencies sharing the same mission, place DeeCilla Comfort Center in a unique position to make a significant difference. Furthermore, While some agencies, such as the Phoenix Dream Center and Phoenix Rescue Mission take in people with various challenges, DeeCilla Comfort Center will narrow the target market to focus on a unique set of societal issues: Domestic Violence, Sexual Assault, and Human Trafficking.

There are programs in the Phoenix area with limited access to the West Valley. Most programs focus on the care and recovery of young girls affected by these issues, yet there are few that offer crisis care and recovery with an established program designed to assist with aftercare. DeeCilla Comfort Center will offer a uniquely designed program that assists in aftercare to promote healing and restoration in the community.

DeeCilla Comfort Center will not only offer gender-focused programs but programs designed to focus on the challenges of specific generations. It is important to promote a healing environment in the community with those the residents share generational similarities.

Agency Collaboration
As active community participants, we aim to take the lead in cooperation with and support from our city elected officials, to connect agencies and resources from across the valley to the citizens of our community. Developing strong partnerships, with resources our community members are unaware of, we aim to work collaboratively to organize community service outreach events to further enhance the life of our overall community residents. We believe by working together to enhance our community, we can also provide education and tools to prevent or deter future accounts of sexual assault, domestic violence, and human trafficking.

Outreach Programs
Outreach programs are designed to capture the audience of the general community, to bridge the community together. Each outreach will not focus solely on serving “an underserved population,” but events will draw communities together to serve and provide the needs for everyone who resides within the community.

Transitional Homes with Aftercare Programs
DeeCilla Comfort Center will offer a unique aftercare program that is a standard part of the resident’s restoration program. Aftercare will guide and residents in living out their “new beginning” action plan.

Five months, Six events , 21 hours , DeeCilla Comfort Center collected items and raised funds to support the following:
February
First Volunteer Orientation held at Goodyear Public Library. Two Volunteers
March
AME Zion Women’s Conference – Domestic Violence Awareness and Prevention. Speaking Engagement and Table Display. The importance of creating safe spaces for open conversations to break the cycle of abuse Reached over 50 women. (4 hours)
April
Arizona State University (Phoenix) Community Impact Expo - Teen Dating Abuse and Community Involvement. 100 ASU Students and local community members on the importance of community involvement and how one can make a difference to prevent Teen Dating Violence. (3 hours)
Volunteer Outreach Event held at Enroute Coffee and Tea.
City of Goodyear, Hop and Hops Easter Extravaganza - Child Abuse Awareness and Prevention. Over 300 families. Innovative engagement project focusing on protecting the Dreams of Children, which provide Hope for the future. Information provided on Teen Dating Abuse, Child Abuse Awareness, and Early childhood development for children birth to five with resources to support families. (4 hours)
Faith Assemblies of God Church, Community Outreach, Phoenix, AZ
Table display set up, providing resources to the local community served by a local church. Assisted a local family of five living in a car on a church parking lot with resources for housing, food, and veteran services. Provided ministerial support and worked with the church to provide immediate clothing, food, and toys for children. Connected with community members for immediate temporary housing. (6 hours)
May
Women’s Health Week. Teen Dating Violence Prevention and Awareness. Four total hours of training provided to twenty representatives from eight organizations on Teen Dating Violence and The Period Poverty. Community outreach conducted to support Domestic Violence Survivors. Over 2000 Items collected and donated (4 hours)
Arizona Governor’s Youth Leadership Day – attended with four youth volunteers for development at GCU. Each attended two seminars during the day to encourage community leadership and engagement.
July
Christmas in July. Focus Child Abuse Awareness and Prevention, Domestic Violence Awareness, and Prevention. Provided services to five families with children birth to five, provided services to aid in early childhood development. Total of 20 attendees (4 hours)
Collected donated items totaling $ 2000 to families with community partners providing wellness and development services totaling over $1500k

For year two, we have increased partnerships to provide more program-based services to include Grief, Loss, and Recovery Counseling, Managing Stress and Anxiety through Declutting workshops, Teen Dating Violence Prevention, Youth Financial Empower Workshops, and Parenting support groups for survivors.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Paper surveys, Case management notes,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently,

Financials

Deecilla Comfort Center
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Deecilla Comfort Center

Board of directors
as of 9/14/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Shawanda R. Randolph

Fresh Manna, LLC

Term: 2018 -

Nasir Randolph

Tamika Cleveland

Academy of Math and Science

Tina Sutton-Beatty

Taco Redempcion

Charlotte Clawson

United Health Care

Nelly Clotter-Woods

Karen Ortega

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Not applicable
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Not applicable

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 09/14/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American/African
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 08/07/2019

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.