PLATINUM2024

ROCKY MOUNTAIN CONSERVANCY

aka Rocky Mountain Nature Association (former name), includes former Rocky Mountain National Park Associates   |   Estes Park, CO   |  www.RMConservancy.org

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Mission

The Rocky Mountain Conservancy promotes stewardship of Rocky Mountain National Park and similar lands through education and philanthropy.

Ruling year info

1969

Executive Director

Ms. Esther Murdock

Main address

PO Box 3100

Estes Park, CO 80517 USA

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Formerly known as

Rocky Mountain National Park Associates

Rocky Mountain Nature Association

EIN

84-0472090

NTEE code info

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (C01)

Natural Resource Conservation and Protection (C30)

Environmental Education and Outdoor Survival Programs (C60)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2022, 2021 and 2020.
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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Founded in 1931, the Rocky Mountain Conservancy is the official nonprofit partner of Rocky Mountain National Park. Our primary mission is to protect and conserve Rocky Mountain National Park and similar public lands through philanthropy, research, education, Conservation Corps projects, and much, much more. Through unique hands-on learning experiences and the Next Generation Fund, the Conservancy also provides childrens and youth programing in Rocky to help inspire the next generation of park stewards and environmental advocates.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Conservation Corps

The Rocky Mountain Conservancy established the Rocky Mountain Conservancy-Conservation Corps (RMC-CC) in 2003 to provide youth, ages 18-25, with the opportunity to perform conservation work in the Arapaho-Roosevelt National Forests (ARNF) and Rocky Mountain National Park (RMNP), while learning about natural resource careers and developing a conservation ethic.
The Rocky Mountain Conservancy provides this opportunity for youth by offering thirty-six internships to high school graduates interested in exploring our nation's public lands, developing a stewardship ethic, and exploring career opportunities in conservation. These interns are spread across six crews consisting of one leader and five crew members. Each crew will spend eight weeks in the field with the National Park Service or USDA Forest Service maintaining trails, restoring watersheds, and improving recreation sites for future visitors. These crews spend these weeks designated to a particular region or ranger district of the public lands, including the Boulder, Canyon Lakes, and Sulphur Ranger Districts of the Arapaho Roosevelt National Forests and the east side of Rocky Mountain National Park. Over the course of this time, interns will learn about a variety of conservation methods, network with natural resource professionals, and engage community groups in volunteer projects. Through this experience, the Conservation Corps crews become stewards of sustainable trail use and public land conservation.
In addition to their eight weeks spent in the field, interns will engage in three to four weeks of outdoor leadership and backcountry ethics training, conservation education, and career development seminars. These programs ground the field work in conservation leadership and stewardship ethics to foster the next generation of conservationists.
Based on past success of the program, the RMC-CC expects crews to spend at least 14,400 total hours outdoors completing projects, participating in field classes, or attending training; crews will spend 80% of this completing on-the-ground conservation projects on public lands and the remainder will be spent developing outdoor skills and an understanding of natural resources.
The program actively targets recruitment of localized populations, specifically undeserved youth along Colorado's Front Range in an effort to better connect communities to their local public lands and to empower opportunity youth with the job skills, experience, and confidence to succeed in their personal and professional life.

Population(s) Served
Students

This fund supports youth education in and around Rocky Mountain National Park including:
Junior Ranger Program
Park Internships for college students
Environmental Education for children
Exhibits and Facilities for children 
Field Seminars for children and families
Fellowships for post-graduates

Population(s) Served
Adults

Being prepared to take action when new opportunities arise to purchase and protect land and vital open space is an ongoing priority. Since 1985, the Rocky Mountain Conservancy has purchased over 150 acres of private land and turned it over to Rocky Mountain National Park and other public land partners.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Rocky Mountain National Park is well-loved by $3 million visitors each year. Consequently, trails are continually in need of maintenance. Sometimes new trail construction is needed. The Conservancy's Trail Improvement Fund helps to support all of these efforts so that visitors will have a safe and enjoyable experience and so that the resources are protected for the future.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of participants attending course/session/workshop

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Age groups, Low-income people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

2020 and 2021 numbers due to COVID-19 pandemic. 2022 limited number of classes.

Average grant amount

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Total number of classes offered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Next Generation Fund

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

2020 and 2021 numbers due to COVID-19 pandemic. 2022 limited number of classes.

Number of books published for previously published writers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

48 books specifically for Rocky Mountain National Park History and Natural History.

Number of volunteers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Land Protection

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

2020 and 2021 numbers due to COVID-19 pandemic. 2022 limited number of volunteer events.

Total number of new organization members

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of acres of land protected

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Land Protection

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of conservation actions at site(s)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Conservation Corps

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Miles of trails maintained, hazardous trees removed from trails, trail drainage structures constructed, wetland crossings constructed, acres managed for invasive plants, check steps created and more.

Number of endowments

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Next Generation Fund

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of overall donors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The Rocky Mountain Conservancy promotes stewardship of Rocky Mountain National Park and similar lands through education and philanthropy. The Rocky Mountain Conservancy envisions present and future generations valuing the importance of Rocky Mountain National Park and other public lands and understanding their relevance to our culture and to ourselves.

With the support of thousands of members and donors, the Conservancy has completed hundreds of significant projects, including construction of workforce housing for park and Conservancy staff, researchers, and fellows; the purchase of the 40-acre Cascade Cottages property for the park; reconstruction of trails and backcountry campsites lost to the East Troublesome and Cameron Peak wildfires; construction of handicapped-accessible trails around Lily Lake and Sprague Lake; and the design and construction of the spectacular Fall River Visitor Center.

Signature programs and projects include:

Conservation Corps
Kawuneeche Valley Restoration Collaborative (KVRC)
Field Institute
Land Protection
Next Generation Fund
Search and Rescue
Trail Improvement
Wildlife Conservation

Our current strategic plan includes:
Enhancing our organizational identity and branding
Expanding donor stewardship
Increasing our Field Institute offerings
Acquiring inholdings to protect adjacent land to the park from development
Becoming an employer of choice in our gateway community
Developing philanthropic support
Ensuring organizational sustainability

Since 1931, the Rocky Mountain Conservancy has been producing educational publications, offering seminars, supporting research, and providing aid and philanthropic support to Rocky Mountain National Park and our other public lands partners. The Conservancy is one of the oldest cooperating associations working with the National Park Service.

The Rocky Mountain Conservancy recently:
celebrated the 20th anniversary of Rocky Mountain Conservancy's Conservation Corps
funded the purchase of a tactical AWD vehicle & UTV for Rocky Mountain National Park Search and Rescue
constructed a 16-bedroom workforce housing unit for Conservancy and park staff on donated land
supported the successful reintroduction of boreal toads in Rocky
responded to the 2020 East Troublesome wildfire in Rocky by creating a Wildland Fire & Healthy Forests Fund
funded the creation of a Diversity Intern Cohort program at Rocky
and much, much more!

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Financials

ROCKY MOUNTAIN CONSERVANCY
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

ROCKY MOUNTAIN CONSERVANCY

Board of directors
as of 03/26/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Walt Borneman

Charles Cofas

Timothy Davis

Katherine Dines

Howard Fry

Stifel Nicolaus & Co.

James Pickering

Brian Ross

Colorado Conservation Trust

Zachary Wiebe

Walter Borneman

Lynne Geweke

Christina Kraft

Kim Skyelander

Laurie Mathews

Rich Fedorchak

Claudine Perrault

Greg Danielson

Liza Grant

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 3/26/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Gender identity
Female, Not transgender

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

No data

Transgender Identity

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data