Attention, Inc. dba TGTHR

TGTHR to end youth homelessness

aka formerly Attention Homes   |   Boulder, CO   |  http://www.tgthr.org

Mission

TGTHR is building a movement that galvanizes communities, empowers young people, and puts an end to youth homelessness. Our goal is to end youth homelessness within our lifetime.

Ruling year info

1967

Chief Executive Officer

Mr Chris Nelson

Chief Operating Officer

Ms. Kristine Edwards

Main address

1440 Pine St Ste B

Boulder, CO 80302 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

84-0571145

NTEE code info

Residential, Custodial Care (Group Home) (P70)

Temporary Shelter For the Homeless (L41)

Homeless Services/Centers (P85)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

TGTHR envisions a world in which all young people are valued, empowered, and safe. Our programs support Colorado youth aged 12-24 who are experiencing or at risk of homelessness as they seek stability and independence. TGTHR’s work is rooted in the relationships we build with youth and the community. As we walk alongside young people during this crucial time of life, we celebrate their diverse perspectives and experiences, as well as their strengths and resilience.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

The Source Overnight Shelter and Daytime Drop-in Center

The Source is a 14-bed overnight shelter and daytime drop-in center for young people ages 12 to 24 who are experiencing or at risk of homelessness. The program conducts street outreach five days a week throughout Boulder County in addition to providing daytime drop-in services that include education and employment support, mental health and substance use counseling, medical care, and other vital services. Daytime drop-in is open daily from 12:30 to 5 pm. Overnight shelter is available from 5:00pm - 8:00am to youth ages 12-21. The goal of programming at The Source is to reduce and prevent youth homelessness through a continuum of services that move youth from the streets toward stable, long-term housing and/or family reunification.

Population(s) Served

Serving youth aged 18-24, TGTHR's housing program includes permanent supportive housing (PSH) at 1440 Pine in Boulder, CO, plus a Transitional Living Program with housing in scattered-site apartments. TGTHR staff provide program participants with case management and work with community agencies, landlords, and government entities to secure rental subsidies that make housing affordable for transition-age youth. The 40 apartment units at 1440 Pine offer non-time-limited housing along with case management, mental health and substance use counseling, education and employment support, plus prosocial activities that help tenants build strong community relationships.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
At-risk youth

TGTHR's Street Outreach program offers street-based engagement with young people who are unsheltered across Boulder County and the metro Denver area. Teams get to know young people and can refer them to local resources, offer meals and basic supplies, and provide case management that connects youth to shelter and housing support.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
At-risk youth
Homeless people
At-risk youth

Chase House is a 10-bed state-licensed Residential Child Care Facility and Qualified Residential Treatment Program that provides a home-like setting for youth ages 12-18 who have been placed in foster care through social services departments. The goal of this program is to provide abused and neglected youth with temporary residential, behavioral, and case management services that prepare them for long-term success. The program is open 24-hours a day, with year-round residential treatment services.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
Out-of-home youth
Adolescents
Out-of-home youth

Where we work

Accreditations

Downtown Boulder Partnership: Nonprofit of the Year Award 2019

Affiliations & memberships

International Accreditation: Qualified Residential Treatment Program 2019

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of people using homeless shelters per week

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Homeless people, Children and youth

Related Program

The Source Overnight Shelter and Daytime Drop-in Center

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

We typically have between 8-10 youth staying in our shelter at any given time. Our program has up to 16 beds in shelter, some specifically reserved for minors.

Average length of stay (in days)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Homeless people

Related Program

The Source Overnight Shelter and Daytime Drop-in Center

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

Youth stay in our shelter program an average of 25 days.

Number of homeless participants engaged in housing services

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Young adults

Related Program

Housing Program: 1440 Pine and Transitional Living Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Youth moving from our Emergency Shelter into stable housing.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

TGTHR is building a movement that galvanizes communities, empowers young people, and puts an end to youth homelessness. Our goal is to end youth homelessness within our lifetime.

The youth we serve are at a developmental stage where trauma can permanently impact their long-term well-being and lead to a future of instability and chronic adult homelessness. TGTHR's programs offer safe resources for youth ages 12-24, including: shelter, mental health and substance use counseling, education and employment support, life skills development, and housing navigation. Our aim is to provide the resources and the environment for youth to: 1) build behavioral, social, emotional and career-related pathways for success; 2) reunite with their families or find permanent, stable housing; and 3) become independent, valued members of the community.

TGTHR provides a range of programs for youth ages 12 to 25 who are experiencing or at risk of homelessness. All TGTHR services use a Positive Youth Development model that is trauma informed and strengths based. Staff help youth identify actionable goals and set a manageable pace for positive change as they implement their plan for transition to independent, stable living in the community. Our services are available 24-7, 365 days per year, making TGTHR a resource hub where youth can find stability, shelter, and access to crucial services that allow them to leave the streets, make healthy choices, build trusting relationships, and find housing.

TGTHR offers a full array of services for youth experiencing or at risk of homelessness.

Chase House, a 10-bed adolescent residential care facility and Qualified Residential Treatment Program for youth placed in foster care, is TGTHR’s longest running program.

Street Outreach offers street-based engagement with young people who are unsheltered. Teams refer young people to local resources, offer basic supplies, and provide case management that helps connect young people to shelter and housing support.

The Source is a 14-bed overnight shelter and daytime drop-in center for young people ages 12 to 24.

Our Housing Program for transition-age youth aged 18 to 24 includes two services:
- 1440 Pine, a 40-unit complex in downtown Boulder offering non-time-limited supportive housing, and
- a Transitional Living Program (TLP) with scattered-site housing plus case management and other supportive services to help participants remain stably housed.

No matter which program youth first encounter, TGTHR staff work closely with them to ensure that they make the transition to their next living situation in the healthiest, safest way possible.

TGTHR’s program participants represent diverse in terms of races/ethnicities, gender identities, and sexual orientations. In response to this diversity – and because youth of color and sexual minorities are disproportionately likely to experience homelessness – we place a high priority on delivering culturally competent services. Without worrying where they will sleep at night, the young people we work with can focus on building long-term, healthy relationships while rebuilding their lives and planning for their future.

TGTHR’s service philosophy is grounded in the following evidence-based principles:

-Positive youth development.
-Strengths-based, participant-centered case management.
-Trauma-informed care.
-Cognitive behavioral therapy.
-Harm reduction.

For more than 50 years, TGTHR has provided services in Boulder County and the Metro Denver area to youth who are experiencing or at risk of homelessness. We are an integral member of Colorado’s homeless prevention community with services that include street outreach, daytime drop-in support and overnight shelter; permanent supportive and transitional housing; plus, a group home with support services for youth ages 12-18 who have been placed in foster care.

TGTHR provides a range of programs for youth ages 12 to 25 who are experiencing or at risk of homelessness. All services use a Positive Youth Development model that is trauma informed and strengths based. Staff help youth identify actionable goals and set a manageable pace for positive change as they implement their plan for transition to independent, stable living in the community. Our services are available 24-7, 365 days per year, making TGTHR a resource hub where youth can find stability, shelter, and access to crucial services that allow them to leave the streets, make healthy choices, build trusting relationships, and find housing.

During FY 2020-2021, TGTHR worked with 254 youth in Boulder County and the seven-county metro Denver area. We provided 4,019 nights of shelter and 1,542 days of drop-in support. Our street outreach team made more than 1,000 contacts with individuals experiencing homelessness and distributed more than 7,500 meals and more than 11,000 items of clothing and other goods. Our staff worked with 146 youth and provided 4,127 hours of individualized case management; 896 hours of mental health and substance use counseling; and more than 700 hours of life skills development. During drop-in services, 63 youth were able to access medical care. During the year, 26 youth gained or maintained employment and 35 youth enrolled in or continued at an academic institution. Twelve youth reunified with their families, from a total of 47 youth who exited our shelter for safe and stable housing. The Transitional Living program helped 25 youth secure housing and provided more than 300 hours of case management and support.

In 2022, we expect to provide more than 4,000 nights of shelter and at least 1,500 days of drop-in support. We expect to serve more than 300 youth across all programs by providing 1,000+ hours of direct case management, 800+ hours of mental health and substance use counseling, 300+ hours of job training, life skills development, plus education and employment support. We anticipate serving more than 6,000 meals and more than 10,000 non-food items such as hygiene and safe-sex kits, clothing, blankets, backpacks and other products. At our overnight shelter, The Source, we will likely offer more than 14,000 referrals to other community service providers such as health clinics and mental health counselors. These referrals and many other resources will be provided during 4,000+ hours of one-on-one case management , 800+ hours of counseling, and 500+ hours of life skills development. Most importantly, we will walk alongside youth as they build behavioral, social, and emotional pathways for success.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Youth between the ages of 12 and 24 who are experiencing or at risk of homelessness

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Revised street outreach schedule and location(s)

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    We strive to uplift youth voices throughout the organization and in each program. Youth are invited to interview candidates for direct care positions and are integral to the process of establishing program structure. Our relationship with young people in our programs has changed for the better since the organization was established in 1966, shifting from the idea of youth as recipients of services to key partners and drivers of change in our effort to end youth homelessness.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time,

Financials

Attention, Inc. dba TGTHR
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Attention, Inc. dba TGTHR

Board of directors
as of 01/28/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Mr Ed Victor

Research & Development, Qualcomm

Term: 2019 - 2022


Board co-chair

Natalie Stiffler

Transportation Planner, City of Boulder

Term: 2016 - 2022

Jayneanne Tuttle

Community Relations Director, Realities for Children Boulder County

Sandra Weeks

President, Blue Spruce Construction Services

Ema Lyman

BVSD McKinney Vento Specialist

Colby Stilson

CEO, Market Insight Out, LLC

Stuart Lord

President & CEO, Delta Developmental, LLC

Niki Thomas

Account Manager, Cisco

Amanda Cole

Redevelopment Project Manager

Betsy Fordyce

Executive Director, Rocky Mountain Children's Law Center

Marci Lucadam

Social Worker & Stay At Home Parent

Tom Romine

Founder & President, Cultivate

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 1/27/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 01/27/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.