Attention, Inc.

Changing Lives of Youth in Crisis

aka Attention Homes   |   Boulder, CO   |  http://www.attentionhomes.org

Mission

Attention Homes provides life-changing resources to youth in crisis. We offer shelter, community-based living, and teaching of life-skills necessary for an independent future. The goal of our program is to reduce youth homelessness with a continuum of service that moves youth from the streets or in the shelter towards stable, long-term housing and/or family reunification. Our program has the only overnight emergency shelter for youth experiencing homelessness or at-risk of homelessness in Boulder County.

Ruling year info

1967

Cheif Executive Officer

Mr Chris Nelson

Chief Operating Officer

Ms. Kristine Edwards

Main address

1440 Pine St Ste B

Boulder, CO 80302 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

84-0571145

NTEE code info

Residential, Custodial Care (Group Home) (P70)

Temporary Shelter For the Homeless (L41)

Homeless Services/Centers (P85)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Since 1966, Attention Homes has provided critical, life-changing services to nearly 12,000 youth in crisis. Findings from the recent Voices of Youth Count (Chapin Hall, Univ. of Chicago, 2017) show that nationwide 1 in 10 young adults age 18-25 experience some form of unaccompanied homelessness during any given year. In the 2019 Point-In-Time count, there were 623 individuals experiencing homelessness in Boulder County; 152 were young adults and children under the age of 24. These numbers are generally accepted as an undercount given barriers to locating youth (particularly given the PIT Count was conducted on a very snowy night in January), and we know there are hundreds more at-risk of homelessness every night in our community. The Source is the only licensed homeless youth shelter and drop-in center along the Front Range of Colorado, from north Denver to the Wyoming border. Without our services, homeless and at-risk youth would simply have nowhere else to go.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Adolescent Residential Care (RES) Program

Our RES program is a state licensed Residential Child Care Facility. The program offers emotional and behavioral support in a safe, structured, home-like setting for at-risk youth between 12-18 years old, placed through social services departments as a result of family disruption. The goal of this program is to provide abused, neglected, and troubled youth with temporary residential, behavioral, and case management services that prepare them for long-term success.  The program is open 24-hours a day, with year-round residential treatment services.

Population(s) Served

Our RHY program is a federally recognized and state licensed Homeless Youth Shelter. The program provides street outreach, day drop-in and overnight emergency shelter services to homeless youth ages 12-24. Our day drop-in center is open daily from 8:00am - 5:00pm to up to 40 youth ages 12-24 and overnight shelter is available from 5:00pm - 8:00am to 16 youth ages 12-20. The goal of this program is to reduce youth homelessness with a continuum of service that moves youth from the streets or in the shelter towards stable, long-term housing and/or family reunification.
Youth in our programs receive a combination of the following core services: safety and supervision in a home-like setting, access to basic needs and overnight shelter, case management and an individualized service plan, family mediation and counseling, crisis management, psycho-educational and psycho-social life-skills groups, independent living skill development, positive adult role models, participation in education and recreational activities, substance abuse support, career counseling, equine therapy, after-care coaching, community integration and referral facilitation to: medical, dental and mental health, education, supported employment, legal, health insurance, county services and housing.

Population(s) Served

Serving youth 18-24 years old, our Transitional Living Program works with community agencies, landlords, and government entities to secure rental subsidies that make housing affordable for youth experiencing homelessness. The Attention Homes Apartments at 1440 Pine Street are a 40-unit supportive housing apartment building for young adults, age 18-24 years old. The Apartments are non-time-limited studio and 1-bedroom apartments, offering independent living with supportive services including case management, counseling, educational and employment supports, pro-social and recreational activities.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Accreditations

Downtown Boulder Partnership: Nonprofit of the Year Award 2019

Affiliations & memberships

International Accreditation: Qualified Residential Treatment Program 2019

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of people using homeless shelters per week

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Runaway and Homeless Youth (RHY) Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

We typically have between 8-10 youth staying in our shelter at any given time. Our program has up to 16 beds in shelter, some specifically reserved for minors.

Average length of stay (in days)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Runaway and Homeless Youth (RHY) Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

Youth stay in our shelter program an average of 25 days.

Number of homeless participants engaged in housing services

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Housing Programs

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Youth moving from our Emergency Shelter into stable housing.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The youth we serve are at a developmental stage where trauma can permanently impact their long-term well-being and lead to a future of instability and chronic adult homelessness. Our mission is to provide life-changing resources to youth in crisis. Our programs offer safe resources for youth ages 12-24, including shelter, support, and access to crucial services so that homeless and at-risk youth can overcome their barriers and achieve their potential. Specifically, our aim is to provide the resources and the environment for youth to meet the following goals: 1) build behavioral, social, emotional and career-related pathways for success, 2) reunite with their families or find permanent, stable housing, and 3) become self-sufficient, productive members of our community.

Attention Homes has three primary programs: our Adolescent Residential Care (RES) facility, our Runaway and Homeless Youth (RHY) shelter and drop-in facility, and our AH Housing Program, include the AH Apartments: a non-time limited Housing First program for young adults 18-24 years old and our Transitional Living Program (TLP) offering supportive services and case management to young adults in scattered site apartments around the Boulder community. Our RES program is a state licensed Residential Child Care Facility. The program offers emotional and behavioral support in a safe, structured, home-like setting for at-risk youth between 12-18 years old, placed through social services departments as a result of family disruption. The goal of this program is to provide abused, neglected, and troubled youth with temporary residential, behavioral, and case management services that prepare them for long-term success. Our RHY program, aka The Source, is a federally recognized and state licensed Homeless Youth Shelter. The program provides street outreach, day drop-in care, and overnight emergency shelter services to homeless and at-risk youth ages 12-24. The goal of this program is to reduce youth homelessness with a continuum of service that moves youth from the streets or in the shelter towards stable, long-term housing and/or family reunification. The AH Apartments are a 40-unit affordable residential building utilizing a Housing First model to provide stable housing and supportive services. Using a Comprehensive Youth-Centered Service Model, our experienced staff will provide trauma-informed, strengths-based case management coupled with educational opportunities, job skills and training, independent living skill building, substance abuse/mental health counseling, and myriad pro-social individual and group activities. Across our programs, we served more than 600+ youth in 2018-2019.

Youth in our programs receive a combination of the following core services: safety and supervision in a home-like setting, access to basic needs and overnight shelter, case management and an individualized service plan, family mediation and counseling, crisis management, psycho-educational and psycho-social life-skills groups, independent living skill development, positive adult role models, participation in education and recreational activities, substance abuse support, career counseling, equine therapy, after-care coaching, community integration and referral facilitation to: medical, dental and mental health, education, supported employment, legal, health insurance, county services and housing. By using methods such as Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Positive Youth Development, and Trauma Informed Care, our staff addresses the needs of individuals and sets a manageable pace for both positive change and maintenance for a healthy lifestyle.

During FY 2018-2019, we served a total of 134 youth in our shelter and 249 in our drop-in program. We provided 2,820 nights of shelter and 5,735 days of care in drop-in. Our street outreach team made 456 contacts with 163 individuals, handing out more than 7,500 items of food, clothing and other goods. Since last October, we have seen a big group of youth engaging with our GED programming in the drop-in center, managing more than 340 hours of course work and with 3 youth graduating with GEDs! Our staff have provided 275 hours of individualized case management for 72 youth; 128 hours of mental health and substance abuse counseling; 285 hours of life-skills development programming; and more than 1,900 hours of pro-social/recreational activities for youth. During drop-in services, our partner organizations provided 50 appointments for medical care, and 14 youth were able to participate in HIV/Hep-C testing. While receiving services at The Source, 133 youth gained or maintained employment.Thirty youth have reunified with their families, and a total of 76 youth have exited our shelter to safe and stable housing. We also have 9 youth that are new participants in our Transitional Living program, bringing the total to 14 youth in our TLP this year who received more than 200+ hours on-going case management support from Attention Homes’ staff as they become fully independent.

During the upcoming funding period, we expect to provide approximately 3,000 nights of shelter and more than 6000 days of care via our drop-in center. We predict we will make approximately 400 contacts with youth via street outreach. We expect to serve more than 600 youth in our program, providing 500+ hours of direct case management, 300+ hours of mental health and substance abuse counseling, 300+ hours of job training, life-skills, education and employment groups and coaching sessions. We anticipate serving more than 14,000 meals in shelter and drop-in and an additional 28,000 meals via outreach. We will likely provide more than 14,000 non-food items during outreach, including hygiene and safe-sex kits, clothing, blankets, backpacks and other products. Within our RHY program, we anticipate providing more than 6,000 education and employment referrals, 2,000 housing referrals, 1,700 medical and 700 legal referrals. In addition, we will likely offer more than 14,000 referrals to other service providers, including health clinics, mental health partners, and other community resources. These referrals and many other resources will be provided during 1,000+ hours of one-on-one case management with individual clients, 500+ hours of mental health and substance abuse counseling, 1,500+ hours of life-skills development, and 600+ hours of employment group sessions. Finally, we aim to offer more than 30 equine therapy sessions, providing innovative care for emotional and physical trauma.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time,

Financials

Attention, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Attention, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 2/25/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Mr Ed Victor

Research & Development, Qualcomm

Term: 2019 - 2022


Board co-chair

Natalie Stiffler

Transportation Planner, City of Boulder

Term: 2016 - 2022

Andrew Burwick

Senior Researcher, Mathematica Policy Research

Peggy Jessel

Retired, Boulder District Attorney's Office

Jayneanne Tuttle

Community Relations Director, Realities for Children Boulder County

Sandra Weeks

President, Blue Spruce Construction Services

Etan Weiss

Michael Moran

Ema Lyman

BVSD McKinney Vento Specialist

Jon Dorn

Managing Director, Active Interest Media

Colby Stilson

CEO, Market Insight Out, LLC

Stuart Lord

President & CEO, Delta Developmental, LLC

Tom Romine

CEO, Cultivate

Niki Thomas

Account Manager, Cisco

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 09/29/2020

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

No data

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

No data

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

No data