Family Tree, Inc.

Empowering Change. Transforming Lives.

aka Family Tree   |   Wheat Ridge, CO   |  http://www.thefamilytree.org

Mission

Family Tree partners with all people to prevent and overcome the interconnected issues of child abuse, domestic violence, and homelessness to promote safety, healing and stability across generations. We serve the seven-county Denver metro area, which includes Adams, Arapahoe, Boulder, Broomfield, Denver, Douglas, and Jefferson counties.

Ruling year info

1977

Chief Executive Officer

Mr. Scott Shields

Main address

3805 Marshall St.

Wheat Ridge, CO 80033 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

84-0730973

NTEE code info

Human Services - Multipurpose and Other N.E.C. (P99)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Family Tree recognizes that poverty, trauma, and crisis are at the root of child abuse, domestic violence, and homelessness. Unfortunately, the demand for affordable housing for adults and families struggling to overcome and end homelessness is critically high throughout the Denver metro area, and has been exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic. For families who are experiencing or at risk of experiencing homelessness, the average time required to locate safe and stable housing can take up to three months or longer. For many in our community, the wait is much longer because they are unemployed, under-employed or have other significant barriers. The National Alliance to End Homelessness indicates experiencing domestic violence is often an immediate cause of homelessness. Additionally, studies indicate that children and youth who are raised in poverty often remain living in poverty throughout their adult lives.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Family Tree Programs

Having served Colorado families affected by crisis and trauma for over 45 years, our mission is to partner with all people to prevent and overcome the interconnected issues of child abuse, domestic violence, and homelessness to promote safety, healing, and stability across generations. Family Tree is the only organization in the Denver metro area working to address the interconnectedness among these issues which is accomplished through the following program areas:

Child Abuse and Neglect: Provides supervised parenting time, safe exchanges, education, treatment, home visitation, and case management to help stabilize families.

Domestic Violence: Keeps domestic violence survivors safe through crisis intervention, emergency shelter, and legal advocacy.

Homelessness: Provides help line, case management, education/employment support, rental assistance, shelter, and resources for those experiencing or at-risk of experiencing homelessness.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
Victims of crime and abuse
Children and youth
Families
Low-income people

Community Family Resource Team: home-based therapy providing crisis intervention, school-based assistance, and support to stabilize families.

SafeCare® Colorado: nationally-recognized, in-home support program providing direct skills training in parenting, child safety, and child health.

Kinship Program: home-based financial/supportive services for relative caretakers struggling to maintain stability/housing for children in their care.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Low-income people
Families

Legal Advocacy Program: increases immediate and long-term safety through civil/criminal legal advocacy and crisis intervention.

Domestic Violence Outreach Program: increases safety/healing, and decreases isolation of victims and their children through advocacy in a safe, community setting.

Parenting Time Program: provides a safe environment for children to spend time with non-residential parent(s).

Roots of Courage: 45-day confidential shelter, case management, and support for survivors of domestic violence and their children

Population(s) Served
Victims of crime and abuse
Children and youth
Adults
Families

House of Hope: up to 90-day shelter, case management, and support for women with children experiencing homelessness.

Homelessness Program: case management, comprehensive support and employment guidance, stabilizing individuals and providing access to affordable housing.

Generational Opportunities to Achieve Long-term Success (GOALS): up to 9 months of temporary residential and supportive services for families experiencing homelessness.

Population(s) Served
Families
Children and youth
Adults
Low-income people
Homeless people

Where we work

Awards

Torch Award 2009

BBB

Outstanding Non-Profit Orgonization Award 2009

State of Colorado

Samaritan Award 2011

Colorado Ethics in Business Alliance

Business of the Year 2011

City of Wheat Ridge, Colorado

Non-Profit of the Year 2019

Wheat Ridge (CO) Chamber of Commerce

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of homeless participants engaged in housing services

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth, Families, Economically disadvantaged people, Victims of crime and abuse

Related Program

Family Tree Programs

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Clients served in the Family Tree Homelessness and Residential programs (House of Hope, Roots of Courage and GOALS). Does not include crisis and helpline calls.

Number of children served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Families, Caregivers, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Family Tree Programs

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Children and youth served in all Family Tree programs.

Hours of supervised visitation provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Families, Single parents, Children and youth, Victims of crime and abuse

Related Program

Programs Addressing Child Abuse and Neglect

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Supervised visitation provides a safe environment for children to spend time with non-residential parent(s).

Number of clients served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth, Economically disadvantaged people, Victims of crime and abuse, Families

Related Program

Family Tree Programs

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Clients served across all Family Tree Programs.

Number of phone calls/inquiries

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth, Economically disadvantaged people, Victims of crime and abuse

Related Program

Family Tree Programs

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Annual number of crisis and helpline calls across programs.

Number of bed nights (nights spent in shelter)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Families, Adults, Children and youth, Economically disadvantaged people, Victims of crime and abuse

Related Program

Programs Addressing Homelessness

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Nights of shelter for residential programs.

Number of clients assisted with legal needs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Families, Economically disadvantaged people, Victims of crime and abuse

Related Program

Programs Addressing Domestic Violence

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Domestic violence survivors provided with legal advocacy services.

Total number of volunteer hours contributed to the organization

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Family Tree operates a robust individual and group volunteer program, which mobilizes those who want to help drive the mission of the organization.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Family Tree partners with all people to prevent and overcome the interconnected issues of child abuse, domestic violence and homelessness to promote safety, healing and stability across generations.

Family Tree STRATEGIC GOALS (2020-2022)

I. Deliver integrated, mission-driven and client-centered services that result in a positive impact on people in our community experiencing crisis, trauma and oppression.

II. Ensure the organizational culture embodies Family Tree’s mission, vision and values and our team includes people who are dedicated, diverse and highly-skilled.

III. Enhance and strengthen community awareness, engagement and advocacy to increase programmatic and financial success.

IV. Ensure a sustainable, responsive infrastructure and financial foundation to provide capacity for the organization to flourish and evolve.

These goals were derived to enhance our impact both internally as an organization, and also with the broader goal of focusing efforts on community transformation.

A major component of Family Tree’s strategic plan is to enhance our program evaluation capacity and approach. Family Tree implements a Continuous Improvement Practice (CIP) utilizing a variety of relevant, strong, and data- aligned tools and program evaluation practices, such as a Client Support Tool, a Client Feedback Survey, Post-exit surveys and a regular review of data dashboards. We also utilize evaluation data to develop individualized plans with each client to promote safety, healing and stability. These efforts were developed and completed with input from team members across the organization and validated with feedback from the people we serve. Progress is evaluated monthly, and program outcomes are reviewed quarterly by our Executive Team and Board of Directors.

Second, Family Tree has been deeply committed to advancing diversity, equity and inclusion within our organization, the people we serve and our community. This commitment is integrated through Family Tree’s strategy and planning, promoted through daily operations, and guided by our employee-led Inclusiveness Committee.  Forty-three percent and of Family Tree team members and 25% of Board members identify as BIPOC. The Family Tree Board of Directors is heavily engaged in diversity, equity and inclusion (DEI) work. Board candidates who are passionate about the organization’s mission and impact, who have been engaged with Family Tree, and who identify as BIPOC have been, and continue to be, recruited to the Board of Directors. We hired Kim Desmond, Consultant and Partner, to provide training to our full team and board members, and to conduct assessments through surveys and SWOT analyses, leading to the development of an Equity Decision-Making tool and Equity Action Plan. The Equity Decision-Making Tool has questions that will guide our programmatic and business decisions to help us: 1) slow down and ensure we are considering decisions from an equity lens, 2) consider the potential benefits and burdens of the decision, and 3) interrupt our assumptions.

Finally, Family Tree is committed to competitively compensating our team members. We have developed salary ranges based on market data, including data from outside the nonprofit sector. By prioritizing use of data from all types of employers across the Denver metro region, we have implemented competitive increases to salary ranges, boosting the pay rates of our team members. The notable market adjustments we did in 2019 and 2021 (>$500K in base pay increases) as well as the Board’s designation of net assets for future investment in the organization and community, provides opportunities to recruit and retain a talented, diverse workforce and operate more efficiently through infrastructural improvements.

Strong Leadership: Over the past fiscal year and looking ahead, Family Tree’s commitment to strategic planning includes a dynamic document of strategic goals paired with ongoing planning. We have two planning teams: a) The Executive Team (ET), which consists of senior leadership and meets bi-monthly and, b) The Expanded Leadership Team (ELT), which includes program and administrative directors and meets monthly. In 2020, The ET worked with the Family Tree Board of Directors to update and finalize strategic goals, goal objectives and success measures where the updated strategic direction was then shared with the ELT to assure planning happens across the organization.

Diversified Funding: Family Tree is committed to continually diversifying and growing our restricted and unrestricted funding. In addition, to ensuring the financial health and vitality of the agency as a whole, the fund development plan prioritizes securing additional unrestricted revenue with a focus on increased giving from individuals, corporations, and foundations to further diversify and increase revenue while decreasing our reliance on governmental funding.

Strategic investments in Organization: At the end of fiscal year 20/21, Family Tree’s Board of Directors voted to establish a designated pool of funds for strategic investment in our team, infrastructure and capacity improvements for the organization. The Board’s designation of net assets for future investment in the organization and community provides opportunities to recruit and retain a talented, diverse workforce and operate more efficiently through infrastructure improvements.

Family Tree has recently implemented a series of Post-Exit Surveys (at 6, 12 and 24 months after engagement) in many of our programs. The post-exit survey assesses the extent to which outcomes have been reached and maintained after engagement with Family Tree, and includes how the clients perceive Family Tree contributed to these outcomes. Analysis of this data will help Family Tree better understand if the impact of our services is sustainable. Family Tree has committed funds from strategic investment funding pool to complete the next step in an integrated data platform.

Family Tree has been working intentionally to engage the voice, experience and leadership of clients in the design, implementation and continuous improvement processes for our programs. Family Tree programs are thoughtfully working to create new outreach strategies to engage clients, such as creating alumni advisory groups, partnering with organizations and leaders in communities and providing services in multiple languages. Because power imbalances and discrimination disproportionately impact BIPOC individuals, we utilize trauma-informed and collaborative approaches during outreach and initial engagement with clients.

Family Tree has recently adopted inclusive hiring practices, such as prioritizing “lived experience” as a qualification for some positions and incorporating equity principles into the job duties.

Family Tree implemented across the board permanent market-adjusted pay increases in July of 2021, approved by the Board, the second adjustment of its kind in just over two years.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Family Tree works with priority populations located in the seven-county Denver metro region who have been affected by child abuse, domestic violence, and homelessness. During our most recently completed fiscal year (2021-2022), internal data indicates we serve primarily female-headed households (60%), most adults are between 26-45 years old (55%), with annual income under $20,000 (55%), upon intake. In fiscal year 2021-2022, Family Tree served 4,508 clients with direct, in-person services, and responded to an additional 15,920 crisis and helpline calls.   Through our three residential facilities, we assisted 506 clients and provided over 22,146 nights of safe shelter to individuals and families.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Community meetings/Town halls, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    This year a few Family Tree Parenting Time clients noted that the lighting in our Karlis Center parking lot was insufficient for them to feel safe when arriving in the evening. Family Tree addressed this concern by adding additional lighting in the parking lot. Since this addition, there have been no comments about safety concerns in the parking lot. Also, at our residential DV program, clients provided feedback on which advocacy and training topics are most valuable for them, including safety planning, community resources, self-care, social skills, communal living, and money management. Staff have tailored their advocacy services accordingly.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    The Family Tree GOALS program facilitates weekly Family Voice and Youth Council Meetings, where residents share ideas for projects, advocate for program guideline changes and discuss community concerns. From these, we learned that teens wanted a physical space of their own to “hang out” or study, so GOALS cleared out an office and a volunteer group redesigned the space with teen friendly furniture, computers and games. On the leadership side, family ambassadors have been involved in the candidate interview process for Family Tree team members. These opportunities for leadership and co-design have changed the level of engagement and completion of goals in the program.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time,

Financials

Family Tree, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Family Tree, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 10/14/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Kami Welch

Arvada Chamber of Commerce

Term: 2021 - 2024

Scott Shields

Family Tree, Inc.

Kami Welch

Arvada Chamber of Commerce

Timothy Pfeifer

Retired

Ted Clifton

Rubin Brown, LLP

Amber Becker

Denver Federal Center

Linda Becker

The Becker Law Firm LLC

Monica Buhlig

Centura Health

Taylor Davis

Vitalant

Cheryl Wink

Englewood City Council

Bradley Jackson

Kent Denver Schools

Pauline Schafer

Touch the Top, Inc. / Erik Weihenmayer

Scott Payant

Retired

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 3/23/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 11/19/2020

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.