Colorado Coalition Against Domestic Violence

Together we can end relationship abuse.

aka Violence Free Colorado   |   Denver, CO   |  http://www.violencefreecolorado.org

Mission

Advancing the well-being of all Coloradans through relationships free from abuse and oppression. We envision a Colorado culture that values and upholds healthy relationships based in equity and respect.

Ruling year info

1978

Executive Director

Amy Miller

Associate Director

Amy Pohl

Main address

1330 Fox Street Suite 3

Denver, CO 80204 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

84-0742604

NTEE code info

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (P01)

Civil Rights, Advocacy for Specific Groups (R20)

Spouse Abuse, Prevention of (I71)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Domestic violence is a pattern of coercive, controlling behavior that can include physical abuse, emotional or psychologic. Nearly 1 in 4 adult women is a victim of domestic violence in her lifetime. On average, three women are killed by a current or former intimate partner each day in America. On September 17, 2013, 978 survivors of domestic violence were served by Colorado domestic violence programs. Five hundred and seventeen (262 children and 255 adults) found safe haven in emergency shelters or transitional housing; 461 children and adults received non-residential assistance, such as counseling, legal advocacy and children’s support groups. However, 205 requests for assistance could not be met (155 of were for housing) because domestic violence victim advocacy programs lacked the resources to meet the need. Women are at an increased risk of harm shortly after separation from an abusive partner, which is why we approach our work from a feminist gender-based violence approach.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Our Values

We respect the inherent strengths and self-determination of survivors.

We lead in partnership with survivors, heeding their experiences, and amplifying their voices.

We strive to end relationship abuse by taking bold, courageous actions.

We pursue social justice, knowing that equity is essential to ending relationship abuse.

We advance equality by challenging power-based perceptions, assumptions, and behaviors.

We mobilize grassroots activism to create systems and attitudes that are free of oppression.

We uphold advocacy and social change as essential to advancing our movement.

We act honestly and fairly, even in the face of adversity.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

As Colorado’s state domestic violence coalition, we are committed to ending relationship abuse by learning from and leading in partnership with survivors and other anti-oppression movements. Preventing violence means changing our society and its institutions—targeting beliefs, behaviors, environments, structures, and policies that perpetuate violence, oppression, and inequality.

That is why we are Violence Free Colorado we know that by addressing the root causes of relationship violence we also work to eradicate conditions where all violence originates. We continue our commitment to promote safety, justice, and healing for survivors along with accountability for individuals using abusive behaviors.

Founded in 1977, Violence Free Colorado is our state’s domestic violence coalition. We work with hundreds of organizations and individuals in local communities across the state to prevent and end relationship violence, and support those affected by relationship abuse. We build the capacity of a diverse network of domestic violence and other community-based programs across Colorado to help them effectively assist survivors of relationship violence and their families. Our goal is to improve individual and community health and well-being through statewide visionary advocacy and social change efforts, supporting our members, and informing the public.

Coalitions are organized groups of people who have come together for the purpose of accomplishing a goal that is common to all parties involved. Due to the fluid nature of coalitions, it is possible for individuals, organizations that share a common mission, and other affiliated organizations to participate within a coalition, while still maintaining their own separate identity. A coalition or alliance may be formed to address matters of common concern to some sector of the community. A local, state or national coalition may focus on improvements within the community. The coalition is a great way for allies from many different backgrounds to come together and work toward the realization of a common cause. Our Coalition Staff has over 100 years combined experience in fighting against relationship abuse and building safer communities.

Violence Free Colorado recognizes that ending relationship abuse in Colorado is long-range work. We are committed to doing this tough work over the long-haul and in the meantime are committed to supporting our members and communities to take the following actions:
Acknowledge that survivors are their own best experts and provide them with resources and support.

Speak out against domestic violence. The problem will continue until society stands up with one resounding voice and says, “No more!”

Challenge victim-blaming statements when you hear them. Victim-blaming attitudes shame the survivor and create barriers to coming forward and reporting the abuse.

Teach your children about what healthy relationships look like by example and by talking about how to show respect and negotiate with others.

Call on your public officials to support life-saving domestic violence services and laws that hold perpetrators accountable.

Donate to local, statewide or national anti-domestic violence programs or victim assistance programs. Click here to make a donation to Violence Free Colorado.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We conduct a member needs assessment annually. Feedback from this survey guides training and TA services provided in the following year.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection,

Financials

Colorado Coalition Against Domestic Violence
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Colorado Coalition Against Domestic Violence

Board of directors
as of 02/11/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Jennifer Eyl

Project Safeguard (Urban Co-Chair)


Board co-chair

Crystal Young

Adovocates Safehouse Project (Rural Co-Chair)

Deb Bittner

Family Tree

Staci Woods

Jackie List

Safe Shelter of St. Vrain

Becky Treece

Care & Share Food Bank

Jill Gruenburg

Response

Holly Kasper-Blank

Bright Future Foundation

Meridythe Winslett

T. Rowe Price

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 9/20/2019

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Decline to state

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 09/20/2019

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.