COLORADO COALITION FOR THE HOMELESS

Creating lasting solutions to homelessness

aka CCH   |   Denver, CO   |  www.coloradocoalition.org

Mission

The mission of Colorado Coalition for the Homeless (CCH) is to work collaboratively toward the prevention of homelessness and the creation of lasting solutions for families, children, and individuals who are experiencing or at-risk of homelessness throughout Colorado. CCH advocates for and provides a continuum of housing and a variety of services to improve the health, well being, and stability of those it serves.

Notes from the nonprofit

HOW WE OPERATE Trauma-informed care is a non-judgmental technique for providing care to someone who has experienced and may still be experiencing trauma. This skill is important for homeless health care providers as homelessness is associated with previous childhood abuse and neglect, intimate partner violence, traumatic brain injury, and a history of military service. Victims of trauma are sometimes left with a sense of betrayal and isolation; therefore, trauma-informed care attempts to provide a safe space for clients to feel heard and supported. Clinicians who employ a trauma-informed approach to care are better equipped to understand the actions of their clients and engage them in treatment planning.

Ruling year info

1984

President and CEO

John Parvensky

Main address

2111 Champa St

Denver, CO 80205 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

84-0951575

NTEE code info

Homeless Services/Centers (P85)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The Mission of the Colorado Coalition for the Homeless is to work collaboratively toward the prevention of homelessness and the creation of lasting solutions for families, children, and individuals who are experiencing or at-risk of homelessness throughout Colorado. CCH advocates for and provides a continuum of housing and a variety of services to improve the health, well-being and stability of those it serves.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Health Care

We respond to the health needs of adults and children experiencing or at-risk of homelessness through innovative health care at one of five Federally Qualified Health Centers. Stout Street Health Center, the largest and most comprehensive program located in downtown Denver, offers medical and behavioral health care, substance use treatment, dental, vision, and pharmacy services all in one building to reduce as many barriers as possible for more than 15,000 patients annually.
Healthcare can be complicated. At the Coalition, we work to ensure it is as stress-free as possible, as well uniquely meeting the needs of people experiencing homelessness. That means we offer health services regardless of a person’s ability to pay, immigration status, gender identity, ethnicity, or race.

Population(s) Served

Housing is the cornerstone to living a healthy, stable life. To that end, we work to match people with suitable housing at one of our housing properties or through partnerships with landlords in the community. Each year, we operate 21 high-quality permanent supportive housing and affordable housing properties managed by the Renaissance Property Management Corporation, and administer nearly 1,500 vouchers, supporting over 5,200 households with housing options in an increasingly unaffordable state.
Importantly, the Coalition offers wrap-around supportive services including counseling, life skills training, financial literacy, and employment assistance at many locations to support the residents to maintain safe and stable housing.
Following the Housing First model, people experiencing homelessness move more quickly off the streets or shelters and into housing. Housing First is a no barrier model that includes rapid access to housing, crisis intervention, and follow-up intensive case management and therapeutic support services to prevent the recurrence of homelessness. Research conducted by the independent Urban Institute has found that people served using the Housing First approach demonstrate a significantly higher level of housing stability at 12 months and longer, and that the Housing First approach costs about half of the alternative cost of law enforcement, criminal justice involvement and emergency medical services for this population.

Population(s) Served

The Coalition conducts ongoing education to build the public’s understanding of the factors that lead to homelessness and advocate for smart, compassionate solutions. Factors such as a critical shortage of affordable and supportive housing, and factors including domestic violence, mental illness, and addiction disorders exacerbate, housing insecurity.

We advocate for policies and resources that allow the most vulnerable Coloradans to achieve and maintain housing stability and access to critical health services.

Population(s) Served

In addition to housing and comprehensive healthcare, we provide a robust array of supportive services including:
• Assistance with public benefit applications
• Childcare
• Support for families
• Employment services
• Legal referrals and advocacy
• Native American Talking Circles
• Street Outreach and street medicine
• Veterans Programs

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of first-time donors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Totals reflect all cash donations and do not reflect in-kind donations.

Average number of dollars given by new donors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Totals reflect all cash donations and do not reflect in-kind donations.

Number of overall donors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Totals reflect all cash donations and do not reflect in-kind donations.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

1. Expand access to quality, integrated health care for families and individuals experiencing or at-risk of homelessness.
2. Expand housing opportunities for families and individuals experiencing or at-risk of homelessness.
3. Improve public policy and community engagement towards ending homelessness.
4. Develop a highly trained, equipped, and engaged CCH workforce.
5. Improve CCH's financial sustainability.

Increase the number of healthcare related visits by addressing population needs, enhancing availability of resources, and removing barriers to access.

Increase the number of clients engaged in multiple integrated healthcare services to address the complex needs of the population we support.

Engage in formal process improvement efforts to ensure provision of care that is safe, effective, patient centered, timely, efficient, and equitable, as outlined in the Institute of Medicine six domains of healthcare quality.

Create new housing opportunities through acquisition and development with emphasis on underrepresented populations, supported by diverse funding sources for housing and essential support services.

Increase permanent housing scattered site subsidies and essential support services through diversified and flexible funding sources.

Increase housing stability through continued program and RPMC collaboration and creatively enhance service delivery to better prepare, educate, and support clients/residents in housing.

Advance public policy initiatives, advocate for social and racial equity, and influence systemic changes alongside the people we support to solve homelessness.

Build strategic relationships and create meaningful engagement opportunities throughout the state to influence policy in the areas of housing, healthcare, and homelessness.

Influence public perception and awareness about homelessness and other systemic issues to re-shape the public narratives through traditional and new media, technology, and innovation.

Build effective and evaluative workforce infrastructure to empower high performing teams.

Foster a culture of continuous learning to support staff competency and development.

Promote equitable movement with the organization by developing career pathing and mentorship opportunities to support Succession Planning to better engage our diverse workforce.

Promote judicious use of financial resources through increased workforce financial awareness, accountability, and improved budgeting practices.

Optimize program and property revenue through efficient management and delivery of services, enhanced tools and support, and increased public grant and charitable support.

Support financial decision-making through formalized processes to review, evaluate, and authorize new and updated business opportunities.

The Colorado Coalition for the Homeless is Colorado's leading provider of services to the homeless, with more than three decades of experience in providing health care, housing, and supportive services to some of the most vulnerable people in the state.
CCH has an extensive network of support in Colorado, including close ties to state and city governments, foundations, businesses, and individual supporters. This support gives the organization the capacity to respond to the many challenges facing the homeless in Colorado.

The Colorado Coalition for the Homeless opened the Stout Street Health Center in 2014, bringing a state-of-the-art medical facility to Denver that was designed to serve the homeless community. By integrating physical and mental health care, pharmacy, dental and vision services, Stout Street has established a model of care that is reaching thousands of Colorado's most vulnerable residents. The Medicaid expansion in Colorado has also allowed CCH to offer more comprehensive care to those in need.
The Coalition has already developed more than 2,000 units of housing and has set a goal of developing 500 new units of housing in the next five years.
Through the Housing First program, CCH has also created a model of care for the chronically homeless that has been proven to help them lead healthier and more productive lives.
Over thirty years, CCH has developed an integrated system of health care, housing, and supportive services that has become a national model for assisting the homeless.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Families, children, and individuals who are experiencing or at-risk of homelessness throughout Colorado.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Community meetings/Town halls, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    The pharmacy area was redesigned to reduce wait times and make it more comfortable for those waiting to fill prescriptions.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Two formerly homeless individuals serve on the Coalition board and are strong advocates for the population we serve. A Consumer Advocacy Board includes twelve residents of Coalition apartment buildings and clients from the Stout Street Health Center. This board gives direct feedback on tenant concerns and makes suggestions to improve health care services.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection,

Financials

COLORADO COALITION FOR THE HOMELESS
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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COLORADO COALITION FOR THE HOMELESS

Board of directors
as of 06/27/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Joel Neckers

Wheeler, Trigg, O'Donnell, LLP

Donna Hilton

Community Development Professional

Thomas Wolf

Instakey Security Systems (retired)

Cuicatl Montoya

Colorado Village Collaborative

Dr. Christopher Bates

Kaiser Permanente

Jennifer Bettridge

Hear Your Clients

Darrell Brown

Alden Brown & Co.

Jay Brown

University of Denver, Sturm College of Law

Mychael Dave

Hoffman, Nies, Dave & Meyer

James Davis

Industrial Specialties Mfg., Inc.

Norman Haglund

Judge, Denver District Court (retired)

Melissa Jones

Civic Volunteer

Randle Loeb

Community Organizer

Lori Malone

Civic Volunteer

Sam Mamet

Colorado Municipal League (retired)

Jynx Messacar

Merchants Office Furniture

T.R. Reid

Author, "A Fine Mess"

Thomas Riley

Northern Trust

Andrew Romero

Regions Affordable Housing

Charles Savage

Happenstall & Savage (retired)

Jane Tidball

Attorney & Judge, Colorado 1st Judicial District Court (retired)

Leanne Wheeler

Wheeler Advisory Group, LLC

Jim Winston

Payne Webber (retired)

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 9/10/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 09/22/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.