Colorado Horse Rescue

We believe that every horse deserves a safe solution.

aka CHR   |   Longmont, CO   |  http://www.chr.org

Mission

Colorado Horse Rescue (CHR) is a 501 (C)(3) non-profit organization dedicated to saving the disadvantaged horse... One human, one rescue, one home at a time.

Notes from the nonprofit

CHR is accredited by the Global Federation of Animal Sanctuaries

Ruling year info

1989

Executive Director

Katherine Gregory

Main address

10386 N 65th St

Longmont, CO 80503 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

84-1095741

NTEE code info

Animal Protection and Welfare (includes Humane Societies and SPCAs) (D20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Every year, more than 75,000 American horses are trucked over our borders to be slaughtered for human consumption. While horse slaughter is illegal in the United States, the fact is that Colorado horses are still being sold for meat. There are simply too many horses in transition for rescues to absorb them all. Current U.S. laws do not protect horses from this industry. While the animals cannot legally be slaughtered in the United States, there is nothing illegal about shipping American horses across the border. Horses bound for slaughter (including pregnant mares, foals and horses who are injured or blind) are routinely shipped from Colorado for more than 24 hours at a time in crowded trucks without food, water, or rest. Once the horses have crossed the border, there is no regulation, no oversight, no FDA making sure the horses are humanely treated or humanely euthanized. The livestock auction gives horse owners an easy way out.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Adoption Program

CHR is dedicated to swiftly placing horses into well vetted adoptive homes. With every horse we adopt out to a loving family, we can help another one in need. Potential adopters are carefully screened via an application, interview process, and home visit. Potential adopters are specifically matched to a horse suited to meet their needs and skill level to help ensure long-term partnership.

Population(s) Served
Adults

CHR offers monthly educational clinics to the community with a focus on responsible horse ownership and natural horsemanship training techniques. CHR increases and diversifies community engagement by offering clinics focused on equine art and equine photography. In addition to practical horse handling techniques, CHR offers topics like, “From Purchase to Performance” which teaches individuals about the costs of owning a horse. Colorado State University’s top veterinarians also present lectures covering the latest health information and best practices for care.

Population(s) Served
Adults

CHR’s training program works to directly rehabilitate our horses so that each one may be placed in an adoptive home. As horses are admitted to CHR they undergo evaluation and a plan is formed to fill in the gaps of their education. This training program reacquaints or introduces our horses to kind and fair handling as they learn ground-manners, trailer loading, as well as skills under saddle. This education results in horses that are more desirable to adopters.

Population(s) Served
Adults

In addition to our Board of Directors, CHR has over 85 volunteers who commit weekly to the mission of the Colorado Horse Rescue. Barn volunteers, riding volunteers, office volunteers, and volunteer board members all play an active role in promoting positive change in the equine community.

Population(s) Served
Adults

CHR is often a horse owner’s last chance when faced with illness, foreclosure, divorce, natural disaster, or the inevitability of old age and death. CHR eases the pain by providing the owner peace of mind in knowing that his/her beloved horse will have a second opportunity to find a loving home.

Population(s) Served
Adults

This program allows screened foster families to care for CHR horses off-site, thus alleviating some of the financial burden for CHR and allowing us to help more horses in need. Often a foster family falls in love with their new family member and makes the decision to adopt.

Population(s) Served
Adults

CHR offers assistance to committed horse owners in the community who are temporarily struggling financially. We provide hay, veterinary assistance, and even supported the rebuild of equine facilities after the 2013 flood. For some families, this funding is the support they need to get through a difficult time and avoid having to surrender their horse.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Colorado Horse Rescue’s LeadChange program provides businesses and corporations the opportunity to work directly with our breath-taking CHR horses. All exercises take place on the ground and are specifically designed to promote communication, problem-solving skills, and innovation, and as a result increase performance in the work place. LeadChange Colorado has its own website at www.leadchangeteambuilding.org. This innovative program increases our visibility, adds significant revenue, and forges new partnerships with local businesses.

Population(s) Served
Adults

As resources allow, CHR saves viable horses in the community from dangerous situations. Some of the circumstances where CHR steps in include: purchasing horses at auction, purchasing from private owners on Craigslist and other online sources, and networking with other local rescues to bring at-risk horses to safety. CHR also facilitates the surrender of horses referred by Animal Control due to owner neglect and abandonment.

Population(s) Served
Adults

We are open to the public 5 days a week. Children and adults are given hands-on learning experiences as they interact with different types of equines a CHR. Visits include personal attention from a staff member who will answer specific questions and provides the opportunity to learn about all aspects of typical rescue operations.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of animals rehabilitated

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of animals rehomed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Disruption due to program closures due to COVID-19 in 2020

Number of animals rescued

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Incoming horses annually. Intake disruptions in 2020 due to COVID-19

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

We are Colorado Horse Rescue, and we are building a better future for horses. We see it. We believe in it. And we are here to make it happen. As a 501(c)(3) impact organization operating in Colorado since 1986, we work to continuously reimagine what’s possible and create a reality where safe solutions exist for every horse.

RESCUE
Imagine a world where no horses fall through the cracks. We see it, and it’s why we actively seek out and take in all types of at-risk horses. We enable owners who have fallen on tough times to rehome their beloved horses without judgement. We also keep our eyes, minds and gates open to horses who would otherwise be sent to slaughter or unsafe conditions via auction or sale.

EDUCATE
Imagine a time where horses are no longer thought of only as tools or sports equipment. We see it, so we help educate the public on responsible horse ownership, engage with our communities to address the issues facing our industry today, and inspire people to invite horses into their lives—as companions, riding horses or other respected roles.

CARE
Imagine a society that empowers every horse to reach their potential. We see it, and we uphold the highest standards of care, rehabilitation and training to help them get there. Complacency isn’t care, so we work to wake up and unite the equine industry to give every horse the life they deserve. We also lead with compassion, providing responsible last acts of kindness to those in need.

ADOPT
Imagine a culture where every horse is valued. We see it, and every successful adoption brings us closer. Our matching process is strategic by design, creating solid horse-and-human partnerships that last and a return rate that’s remarkably low.

1-2 Year Strategic Response: CHR will respond to ensure all horses have a safe solution.
Marketing/Brand Refresh:
*As our vision for CHR evolves, our capabilities expand, and our impact grows, our logo needs to be able to adapt with us. We want our logo, branding, and messaging to not only reflect our Rocky Mountain roots, but also differentiate us from other organizations. We have created a simple, iconic identity for CHR as a leader in our industry and a champion for horses. Our new branding is optimistic, modern, and forward-looking… just like Colorado Horse Rescue. new branding is being rolled out for increased impact, marketing across all programs is being improved (includes website overhaul)
*Devising a plan to fight the stigma of “rescues” through marketing

Process & Systems Improvement:
*Strengthening our fundamentals - across all areas - to be a best-in-class horse rescue
* Devising systems to manage donors, volunteers, and the life cycle of horses is essential to effectively and efficiently manage, new systems either built via add-ons to an existing solution or creation of new EMS

Facility Redesign:
*CHR built for long-term stays, revised facility plan will increase throughput of horses into adoptive homes
*Optimize for training, higher throughput
*Intake/quarantine area insufficient
Two options – modify the existing location to cover all needs or move to a new location

3-5 Year Strategic Response: CHR will use education as a tool to solve the unwanted horse issue.
*Critical information resource for the horse community:
Examples:
I can’t afford to feed my horse
I can’t afford to euthanize my horse
What are my options for euthanasia
I need to sell my horse quickly

*Partner with Universities:
Add unwanted horse issue to curriculum
Build an intern program across functions

*Create certification programs:
Horse rescue – or some other name
Farriers, acupuncture, chiropractor
Partner with schools to use our horses
Right Horse – are they thinking about this?

*Increase clinic offerings:
On site at CHR
Other locations

3-5 Year Strategic Response: CHR will advocate for equine protection and support.
*Partner with AQHA Foundation:
End of life services
Welfare support for quarter horses in transition

*Investigate a protected class for equines:
Change to “companion” has significant $ implications
Livestock proves to be too broad of a category
Equines not bred specifically for human consumption

*Create state/national equine standards of abuse:
Has this helped in states that have done it?
What was the cost?
Who supported it?
What would they do differently?

With a talented staff of 8, an invested Board of Directors, a volunteer base of nearly 100 dedicated community members, and a strong donor base, CHR is home to a diverse family of passionate equine welfare advocates. We also partner with a number of local vendors to achieve and implement excellent operational and equine care standards.

The Right Horse Initiative has identified CHR as an official Right Horse Partner. The Right Horse Initiative is funded by the WaterShed Animal Fund, a division of the Arnall Family Foundation and is dedicated to massively increase the number of successful horse adoptions in the United States. We are now part of a collective of horse industry professionals and equine welfare advocates leading the industry toward positive solutions through collaboration, education, training, and public awareness on a national level. We are pioneering innovative processes and programs, as well as upholding the highest standards for care. We are reframing equine adoption and the fate of horses in transition.

Accomplishments include maintaining a steady donor base for funding basic operations and operating in a fiscally conservative and responsible manner. Our adoption rate doubled this year, assist disadvantaged horse owners, implement equine training and educational programs, and slowly but surely improve the overall facility set-up. All the while, we are seeing an upswing in public awareness of the organization through a myriad of fundraising, special event, and PR efforts.

The Field Rescue Program has been extremely successful. As resources allow, CHR purchases horses at public auctions and rehabilitates them. These are the horses that have no human advocate otherwise and have found themselves in dangerous and at-risk situations. They are also extremely viable animals, and we have a 100% adoption success rate with this program including rideable and companion horses.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person),

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To inform our strategic plan.,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We developed a full 5-year strategic plan.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection,

Financials

Colorado Horse Rescue
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Colorado Horse Rescue

Board of directors
as of 10/20/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Dan Burak

Sterling Rice Group

Term: 2019 - 2022

Julie Oelman

Terra Firma Law, LLC

Dan Burak

Sterling Rice Group

Angela Primavera

Google

Molly Vaughn

The Springs Living

Donnell Heistand

Girl Scouts of Colorado

Jim Czepiel

JRF Ortho

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 02/01/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data