PLATINUM2023

Junior Achievement USA

Empowering young people to own their economic success since 1919.

aka JA USA, JA   |   Colorado Springs, CO   |  www.ja.org

Mission

Junior Achievement’s purpose is to inspire and prepare young people to succeed in a global economy.

Ruling year info

1994

President & CEO

Mr. Jack E Kosakowski

Main address

12320 Oracle Blvd., Suite 325

Colorado Springs, CO 80921 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

84-1267604

NTEE code info

Business, Youth Development (O53)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2022, 2021 and 2019.
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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

In 2019, Junior Achievement is celebrating a century of bringing life-changing experiences to more than 112 million young people. Junior Achievement was launched 100 years ago in answer to the questions raised by the changing world where people moving from farms to cities lacked the vital skills necessary to find their way forward. Today, our young people face similar challenges in an ever-changing and complex 21st century economy in which 72% of Americans say they struggle with money-relates stress, 60% of employers say recent graduates lack basic job skills and 90% of businesses fail. Unfortunately, schools are struggling to provide students with relevant, real-world experiences that equip young people to thrive as they enter adulthood. Junior Achievement is committed to helping young people excel, by providing hands-on, cutting edge educational experiences that enable young people to experience and understand the opportunities and realities of work and life in the 21st century.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Financial Education

Junior Achievement offers a distinct method of empowering youth to own their future economic success. The central theme found across JA’s research-based financial literacy, entrepreneurship and work readiness curriculum is that excellence in school leads to success in the real-world. All programs emphasize this school-to-career idea while teaching real-life concepts, such as ethical decision-making, opportunity costs, money management, career preparation and global competition while reinforcing important life skills, such as critical thinking, public speaking, teamwork, problem solving and budgeting. JA’s K-12 curriculum is organized into grade-specific elementary, middle and high school programs, and taught by local volunteers from the business community during the regular school day. These volunteers are recruited and trained by JA staff, and their time spent in the classroom is fundamental to our success; they lead activities while sharing their own life experiences, challenge students to think beyond their present circumstances, and reinforce basic skills crucial to succeeding in our modern economic system.
All JA programs are FREE to participating schools, volunteers and students.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Where we work

External assessments

Evaluated via the Impact Genome Project (2019)

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of students enrolled

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Financial Education

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

Junior Achievement USA students reached in inner cities, suburbs, and rural areas throughout the United States.

Total number of classes offered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Financial Education

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

JA programs are taught in classrooms and after-school locations by volunteers.

Number of volunteers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Financial Education

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Volunteers come from all walks of life, including: business people, college students, parents and retirees. These dedicated individuals are the backbone of our organization.

Number of Host Sites/Schools

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Ethnic and racial groups

Related Program

Financial Education

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Junior Achievement USA is the nation's largest organization dedicated to giving young people the knowledge and skills they need to own their economic success, plan for their futures, and make smart academic and economic choices. This ultimately bolsters the local workforce and contributes to our national economic growth. Junior Achievement's portfolio of Kindergarten - 12th grade educational programs - in the core content areas of work readiness, entrepreneurship and financial literacy - equip young people with the confidence and skills needed to become a rising star in the workplace, start a business that changes the world, and make wise money choices.

Junior Achievement USA is merging JA's proven volunteer based delivery model with the latest technology to create a blended learning environment that provides a relevant, responsive and innovative portfolio of learning experiences. We continue to digitize the Junior Achievement experience and optimize the impact of our volunteers. Blended learning leverages robust and relevant technologies and allows us to personalize learning for our students.

Volunteers are what make Junior Achievement possible. They are the leaders, role models, teachers and mentors who invest their valuable time, bringing the Junior Achievement experience to schools and students across the country. Volunteers transform the key concepts of Junior Achievement lessons into a message that inspires and empowers students to believe in themselves, showing them they can positively impact their own future and make a difference in the world. Most importantly, Junior Achievement volunteers foster self-belief and a sense of purpose necessary for young people to overcome challenging circumstances.

Junior Achievement programs are thoroughly evaluated and vetted to ensure the highest educational experience and impact. Further, Junior Achievement programs correlate to national, state, and district educational standards, including those by the Jump$tart Coalition for Personal Financial Literacy, the National Business Education Association, the National Center on Education and the Economy, 21st Century Student Outcomes from the Partnership of 21st Century Skills, the National Council for the Social Studies Curriculum standards – C3 Framework, and Common Core State Standards. JA relies on external formative and summative evaluations to ensure program quality and impact. Research shows JA programs take students from a mindset of “I Can’t” to “I Can” by affecting attitudinal factors and promoting knowledge gain that result in fostering positive behavioral outcomes.

Volunteers are paramount to the success of Junior Achievement programs in transforming the lives of young people. As such, Junior Achievement USA continues to evaluate and explore new ways in which Junior Achievement can maximize the effectiveness and efficiency of our most valued resource and their impact on young people. As a provider of effective volunteer engagement and premiere volunteer experiences, 99% of JA volunteers report they would recommend the experience to others.

During the 2017-18 school year, Junior Achievement impacted more than 4.8 million students in 107 JA Areas across the United States through the help of more than 245,000 dedicated volunteers in over 211,000 classrooms. Of the Junior Achievement students impacted, 54% qualify for free or reduced lunch. Our vision is to ensure that every young person we reach is equipped with the critical life skills necessary to positively impact their lives, families and communities.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We share the feedback we received with the people we serve, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time

Financials

Junior Achievement USA
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Junior Achievement USA

Board of directors
as of 04/18/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Alan Armstrong

The Williams Companies

Term: 2022 - 2024

Evelyn Angelle

Alan S. Armstrong

The Williams Companies

Ashley D. Bell

Dentons

Catherine S. Brune

Allstate Insurance Company

James M. Carroll

Honeywell International

Arnold B. Evans

SunTrust Bank

Becky Frankiewicz

ManpowerGroup

Akberet Boykin Farr

Emerson

Alyson Griffin

State Farm Insurance

Christopher L. James

National Center for American Indian Enterprise Development

Kyle H. Hybl, Esq.

El Pomar Foundation

Clyde D. Keaton

K-Crest Management

Larry Leva

KPMG International

Robert Lloyd

Rodney O. Martin, Jr.

Voya Financial

Paul E. McKnight

Emerson

Niloufar K. Molavi

PwC, US

Laura M. Newinski

KPMG LLP

Roy A. Ng

Bond Financial Technologies, Inc.

Tracy LaFlamme Ortega

Bell Group

Jeanette Hernandez Prenger

ECCO Select

Marna J. Ricker

EY LLP

Dino E. Robusto

CNA Financial Corporation

Lawrence W. Sidwell

Adam Arroyos

SERVE2PERFORM

Maggie Thomason

Citi

Cesar Villalta

Accenture

Cid Wilson

Hispanic Association on Corporate Responsibility

Gunjan Kedia

U.S. Bank

Bill Kracunas

RSM US LLP

Sandra E. Lope

Microsoft

Alex Sevilla

Vanderbilt University

Pamela Bentley

GCM Grosvenor

David Cook

AccentCare

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 5/17/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 03/29/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.