PLATINUM2024

Focus Points Family Resource Center

Building better communities by strengthening families

Denver, CO   |  www.focuspoints.org

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Mission

To build better communities by strengthening families.

Ruling year info

2001

Executive Director

Jules Kelty

Main address

2501 East 48th Ave

Denver, CO 80216 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

84-1353944

NTEE code info

Family Services (P40)

Employment Procurement Assistance and Job Training (J20)

Adult, Continuing Education (B60)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Focus Points serves low-income immigrants and refugees in the Globeville and Elyria-Swansea (GES) neighborhoods of North Denver. GES is one of Denver's oldest and most ethnically diverse communities, home to a large Latinx and immigrant/refugee population. However, while Denver's economy and population continue to expand, the residents of GES have experienced an unjust and unequal burden caused by this growth. Denver’s Neighborhood Equity Index reveals that GES residents struggle with limited access to food, high levels of air pollution, and high rates of chronic health conditions. Denver’s housing crisis exacerbates these health inequities. While these statistics do not define the community, they provide a helpful socioeconomic backdrop to Focus Points programming and partnerships, which are designed to help remove these barriers.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Early Childhood Education

Focus Points provides two early childhood education programs designed to prepare young children for kindergarten. Bilingual parent educators provide monthly home visits to Spanish-speaking families using the evidence-based Parents as Teachers (PAT) and Home Instruction for Parents of Preschool Youngsters (HIPPY) curricula. These programs help prepare children for school by emphasizing the importance of parents reading to their children and helping children learn basic skills.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Families
Parents
Caregivers

Our Family Support Specialists meet one-on-one with community members, helping them access a wide array of vital resources and services that make their lives better. These include food and nutrition benefits, health insurance, utility and rental assistance, childcare, and more. The team also partners with Wellpower to provide adults and teens with free mental health counseling. They also ensure that community members are connected with any and all of the other programs Focus Points offers, as per their needs and interests.

Population(s) Served
Families
Economically disadvantaged people

Focus Points is one of the main providers of English Language Acquisition (ELA) classes in metro Denver, offering six levels of classes both virtual and in-person. Focus Points' ELA program offers contextualized curriculum that provides students a link between what is being learned in the classroom with future career goals.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Comal Heritage Food Incubator (Comal) is a social enterprise program that provides employment and training in food industry standards to promote sustainable career advancement. This enterprise utilizes an "earn-while-you-learn" model that provides participants with a stipend while they prepare for careers in the culinary industry. Comal supports immigrant and refugee aspiring entrepreneurs to transform their heritage recipes into their own food businesses. This program offers paid, on-the-job training and operates a restaurant and catering services. Comal was featured on CNN's Champions for Change and in The New York Times list of "America's Favorite Restaurants: Where We're Most Excited to Eat This Year."

Population(s) Served
Immigrants
Refugees and displaced people
Women

Huerta Urbana 2Gen Farm Incubator is an agricultural social enterprise which includes a central urban farm developed on the Focus Points site. The program employs an "earn-while-you-learn" model that trains families in local food production and distribution. Families participating in Huerta Urbana receive a stipend while developing long-term earning potential and acquiring technical skills, and graduate with the Colorado State University Beginning Market Farmer Certificate. Huerta Urbana holds a weekly "pay-what-you-can" farmers market that offers access to fresh, local produce in the GES community every May to October.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Families

Where we work

Awards

Blue Ribbon National Status 2023

Parents as Teachers (PAT)

Affiliations & memberships

Family Resource Center Association (FRCA) 2023

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of clients served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of families served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Pounds of produce grown

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Huerta Urbana 2Gen Farm Incubator

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of zip codes reached with direct services or referrals

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Family Support Services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Focus Points aims to achieve the following strategic outcomes in accordance with our four main program pillars:

1) Economic Inclusion: Driving long-term economic stability in families and communities by teaching new job skills, advancing careers, and co-creating businesses and social enterprises

2) Education: Catalyzing success for children and adults by providing training and skill-building opportunities

3) Family Support: Advancing family sustainability through classes and guidance, using a goal setting and strengths-based approach

4) Community Resources: Connecting people to resources in order to advance health equity, financial stability, networks, and community

Since its inception in 1995, Focus Points has taken a multi-generational approach to addressing the challenges that families face in achieving personal and familial sustainability. This means offering tailored services and learning opportunities that reach both children and parents as well as older adults. The Aspen Institute has shown that multi-generational (2Gen) programs effectively break the cycle of intergenerational poverty by addressing multiple needs in the same household, and this approach remains foundational to all Focus Points’ programming and activities. The 2Gen approach is also a catalyst for systemic change, leading to stronger educational and human welfare outcomes for families, and thus an equitable community.

Focus Points provides the following programs for the GES and neighboring communities:

Early Childhood Education: Focus Points provides two early childhood education programs designed to prepare young children for kindergarten. Bilingual parent educators provide monthly home visits to Spanish-speaking families using the evidence-based Parents as Teachers (PAT) and Home Instruction for Parents of Preschool Youngsters(HIPPY) curricula. These programs help prepare children for school by emphasizing the importance of parents reading to their children and helping children learn basic skills.

Family Support Services: Our Family Support Specialists meet one-on-one with community members, helping them access a wide array of vital resources and services that make their lives better. These include food and nutrition benefits, health insurance, utility and rental assistance, childcare, and more. The team also partners with WellPower to provide adults and teens with free mental health counseling. They also ensure that community members are connected with any and all of the other programs Focus Points offers, as per their needs and interests.

English Language Acquisition (ELA): Focus Points is one of the main providers of ELA classes in metro Denver, offering six levels of classes both virtual and in-person. Focus Points' ELA program offers contextualized curriculum that provides students a link between what is being learned in the classroom with future career goals.

Social Enterprise: Focus Points operates two social enterprise programs, Comal Heritage Food Incubator and Huerta Urbana 2Gen Farm Incubator, which help men and women train for careers in the culinary and agriculture industries, respectively. Both enterprises leverage an "earn-while-you-learn" model that supports participants as they develop the tools and technical skills needed to move beyond low-paying jobs, improve their long-term earning potential, and achieve greater career mobility.

Focus Points is well-known within the Denver non-profit sector as a primary service provider for the GES and surrounding neighborhoods, and we have a wide network of service partners in the community that directly contribute to our organizational and program success. Additionally, Focus Points is a member of the Family Resource Center Association (FRCA) of Colorado, which also contributes support that includes some grant funding, staff training, and opportunities to collaborate around advocacy efforts toward public policy and public perception of issues that affect the people we serve. Service partner organizations for all of our programs collaborate with us in several ways.

Focus Points was founded on the principles of justice, equity, diversity and inclusion, and we exist for the sole purpose of helping to address historical and systemic inequities that our community experiences. Our strategic plan and all programming are community-driven. This means that community members themselves, including program participants, are involved in the identification of community needs, provide ideas for programming and content, and work together with staff to develop them. Focus Points receives regular input and guidance from its Community Advisory Committee, a group of program participants that liaises with our Board of Directors and helps guide decision-making.

We recognize that programs are only effective if the staff members who manage and facilitate them reflect a commitment to inclusivity, and we make an intentional effort to invest in and recruit community members to fill staff vacancies. 79% of staff identify as BIPOC, 100% are bilingual, and many are immigrants or first-generation Americans. Our DEI committee ensures that internal and external systems, practices, and policies are inclusive, and leadership meets monthly with this committee to identify challenges and solutions.

The Focus Points’ Board of Directors is a dedicated group of volunteer leaders who provide oversight to the organization, including sound, ethical, and legal governance and financial management policies. The majority of the board BIPOC individuals, and two board members grew up in the GES community.

In fiscal year 2023, Focus Points served 490 families, or 2,940 individuals, with resources and opportunities to pursue their economic and educational goals. Program highlights from 2023 include:

• Our Parents as Teachers (PAT) program earned Blue Ribbon National Status for the sixth consecutive year. The program was also named one of 200 “Gold” winners from among 924 PAT affiliates in the U.S., U.K., Canada, Germany, and Switzerland. Our PAT educators served 71 children through 921 home visits.

• Our Home Instruction of Parents of Preschool Youngsters (HIPPY) program also showed excellent results. All participating HIPPY families are offered weekly visits during the program season, which runs from mid-September to mid-May. 84% of families received at least 75% of their weekly in-home visits, meeting the statewide standard for Colorado.

• Our Family Support Services (FSS) team supported 311 families in accessing at least one critical service. Residents from over 30 zip codes either received direct services from Focus Points’ FSS team or were referred to external partners.

• Our ELA programs reported combined enrollment of 327 unique students this fiscal year. Our ELA programs also hosted two picnics, allowing for socializing and networking between students and their families. Donations were collected and distributed to families at the event that included winter clothing, diapers, and children’s books.

• Comal hosted four participants, three from Mexico and one from Venezuela. The restaurant completed its relocation to an upgraded space in Denver’s trendy RiNo ArtPark. The expanded facility enables other small business owners to utilize a commissary (or shared-use) kitchen for food production, broadening the organization’s reach to encompass past participants and beyond.

• Huerta Urbana continued to promote access to hyper-local produce through both its one-acre farm and weekly “pay-what-you-can” farmers market. The first cohort of program participants celebrated four graduations, with an additional four participants currently active in the second cohort. The farm produced 1,680 pounds of produce and distributed 85 “bounty boxes,” packed with a variety of nutritionally dense food items needed for families.

Fueled by valuable community feedback, Focus Points is actively constructing an all-encompassing strategic plan that addresses a variety of community-related concerns shared by local families, the majority of whom are grappling with housing uncertainties, displacement from gentrification, and escalating costs of living due to inflation. As we move through the strategic planning and community feedback process, our existing programs may require reimagining. As a vital part of the GES community, our continued adaptability will be essential.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We share the feedback we received with the people we serve

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time

Financials

Focus Points Family Resource Center
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Focus Points Family Resource Center

Board of directors
as of 02/12/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Damon Ramirez

U.S. Bank

Gina Seeley

Self-Employed CFO

Tonia Martinez

Career Transformations Recruiting Consulting Firm

María Corral

Consultant

John Martinez

City and County of Denver

Elpidia Sánchez Nieto

Self-Employed Attorney

Keyur P. Parikh

Armstrong Teasdale

Grace López Ramírez

Xcel Energy

Kristen Berg

Colorado Senate Majority Office

Lauren Granado

Professional Case Management (PCM) Trials

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/12/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 11/17/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.