FOUNDATION FOR HUMAN ENRICHMENT

Transforming lives through healing trauma.

aka Somatic Experiencing® International   |   Boulder, CO   |  www.traumahealing.org

Mission

Somatic Experiencing® International has been providing access to wellness skills in trauma relief in 40 countries for over 27 years. Our mission is to support trauma resolution and resilience through culturally responsive professional training, research, education, and outreach in diverse global communities all through the modality of Somatic Experiencing®. Since our inception, more than 125,000 professionals have been instructed worldwide through a broad array of trainings, research studies, conferences, and digital libraries. Our organization includes more than 1,400 staff, faculty, coordinators, and training assistants staffed across 6 continents.

Ruling year info

1997

Executive Director

Marv Tuttle

Main address

5303 Spine Rd Suite 204

Boulder, CO 80301 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Somatic Experiencing® Trauma Institute

EIN

84-1360261

NTEE code info

Private Operating Foundations (T23)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The World Health Organization estimates nearly 3.6% of the world’s population, or 280 million people, have suffered from post-traumatic stress disorder in the previous year. Likewise, as of 2020, rates of trauma exposure in the US are estimated to be as high as 60% in the general population. These statistics, compounded by the fact that crisis situations such as natural disasters, mass violence, and a global pandemic can have long-lasting traumatic impacts on individuals and communities, require a focus on embracing and supporting those experiencing new and/or increased traumatic hardship.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Somatic Experiencing® Professional Training Program

The Somatic Experiencing® (SE™) Professional Training program is a continuing education certificate program designed to enhance the skills of professionals working with traumatized or stressed individuals. Through our membership association, we support the self-organization of a broad international network of passionate, skillful SE™ practitioners who serve individuals in need and communities in crisis around the globe.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Ethnic and racial groups
Religious groups
Sexual identity
Work status and occupations

Somatic Experiencing® International membership provides SE™ practitioners, mental-health partners, medical and crisis management staff, and bodyworkers with varying levels of benefits, providing access to a practitioner directory listing, community forum access, ABMP & USABP membership discounts, discounted SE™ educational webinars, master classes with Dr. Peter A. Levine, and website hosting through TherapySites. Membership dues also support Somatic Experiencing® International in developing new programs and providing scholarships for low-income professionals serving individuals and communities in need.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Ethnic and racial groups
Religious groups
Adults
Ethnic and racial groups
Religious groups
Academics

Somatic Experiencing® International’s Crisis Stabilization and Safety program (CSS) is an innovative crisis intervention and peer support program designed to achieve advanced health outcomes at times when individuals and communities are most vulnerable in their mental health needs due to catastrophic crisis. Through direct utilization of SE™ principles, CSS provides crisis intervention in a structured peer-to-peer model, with psychosocial education and direct support to individuals through group work to support shared goals for healing, wellness, and sustainable resilience.

Population(s) Served
Ethnic and racial groups
Social and economic status
Emergency responders
Veterans
Adults

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of students enrolled

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Somatic Experiencing® Professional Training Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of students enrolled in the SEP professional training program.

Number of students registered for online courses

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Somatic Experiencing® Professional Training Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of students who participate in our online offerings, including online SE Basics courses and webinars.

Number of students who receive scholarship funds and/or tuition assistance

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Somatic Experiencing® Professional Training Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of training events conducted

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of in-person, hybrid, or virtual training events conducted worldwide.

Number of training workshops

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of webinars produced throughout the year. Webinars are a new offering from SEI as of 2020 and expand access to programming across geographical borders.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

First conceptualized by Dr. Peter Levine in the 1970s, Somatic Experiencing is an approach to trauma that, rather than focusing only on thoughts or emotions associated with a traumatic event, expands to include the natural bodily responses. Across the globe, Somatic Experiencing® has come to be considered an effective, innovative treatment for trauma prevention and resolution.

As an emerging evidence-based psychotherapeutic model, Somatic Experiencing® aims to interrupt and reduce the impact of trauma, to support the resolution of current and past trauma, and to edify individuals and communities against further threats to public health, mental health, and relative safety.

Somatic Experiencing® International is dedicated to deepening understanding of the Somatic Experiencing® modality and how it can heal trauma. We strive to position SE™ as a leading, global best practice for healing trauma through certification, research, and public awareness.

As an organization founded with education at our core, our primary focus is on helping the helpers. In more than 40 countries, professionals participate in our robust and comprehensive trainings, held both in-person and online. Training is delivered through a combination of lectures, live demonstrations, guided practice sessions, audio‐visual case studies, and suggested readings. Students enroll in one of our many offerings: a three‐year curriculum designed to lead to the Somatic Experiencing® Practitioner certificate (SEP), short courses on the basic principles of Somatic Experiencing®, and assistant and provider programs.

Another part of our focus is on advancing SE™ research to become an evidence-based modality. An evidence-based approach to medicine, education, and other disciplines is based on a robust body of rigorous scientific studies and emphasizes the practical application of the research findings. Applying evidence-based principles in Somatic Experiencing® treatment ensures that providers have the best evidence as a starting framework, while simultaneously affording them the flexibility to individualize treatment. This also provides professionals the ability to assess research data and decide if and how to incorporate SE™ into their practice. Somatic Experiencing® International provides expert guidance, digital libraries of resources and statistics, and community conversations to promote the advancement of SE™ research.

Simultaneously, through direct utilization of SE™ principles, Somatic Experiencing® International operates an innovative crisis intervention and peer support intervention called the Crisis Stabilization and Safety (CSS) program. By providing crisis intervention in a structured peer-to-peer model, CSS provides psychosocial education and direct support to individuals to support the shared goals for community healing, wellness, and sustainable resilience.

All programs are created and delivered with inclusive, culturally-sensitive and responsive, and international perspectives in mind.

Somatic Experiencing® International is composed of more than 1,400 staff, faculty, coordinators, and training assistants impacting more than 40 countries as of 2021.

Our experienced faculty come from diverse professional backgrounds and teach Somatic Experiencing® on six continents. Potential faculty members are carefully screened, selected from a group of senior SE™ Practitioners, and undergo a rigorous, extensive faculty training and mentoring program. Each faculty member is held to the highest professional and ethical standards and are monitored through regular class evaluations.

Somatic Experiencing® International is led by an engaged Board of Directors who—on the basis of their specific knowledge, skill, and experience—make valuable contributions to our current functioning and future development. The Board, with members from both within and outside of the SE™ community, collectively holds responsibility for stewardship of SEI. The Board seeks guidance as necessary from advisors recommended by and including Peter A. Levine, PhD, from a number of committees addressing various aspects of SEI's work, and from expert consultants in a variety of disciplines.

Lastly, SEI has 10 workgroups and committees dedicated to initiatives that support our community and advance our strategic plan: from Curriculum Development to Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (DEI), SE Research, Mentorship, and more.

As of November of 2021, more than 125,000 professionals across six continents have been trained in Somatic Experiencing® through the SEI curriculum, with new courses being offered throughout the year and hundreds of new students enrolling.

SEI has begun the process of publishing and compiling videos, podcasts, articles, and books related to SE research with topics such as key concepts in SE™ work, SE™ in attachment, and SE™ for PTSD treatment. In doing so, SEI has become the preeminent source for resources on SE™. Our Somatic Experiencing® Practitioner directory is also the most comprehensive database of SEPs available worldwide. Community Conversations, which bring together key members from the SE™ community to discuss SE™ interventions, applications, and connections across disciplines, are housed on social media and our website.

Finally, the Crisis Stabilization and Safety (CSS) program launched its pilot programs in 2021, providing direct services and trainings across the United States for those impacted by disasters.

For 2022, SEI continues to grow: we are in the process of creating a global, inclusive, and diverse professional association to serve Somatic Experiencing® Practitioners, students, and affiliated groups. In addition, we will be expanding our public health offerings in multiple markets across the United States and establish sustainable community support systems in the country’s most vulnerable areas.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Medical Community: doctors, nurses, physical and occupational therapists, medical academics, hospital social workers Workplace: human resources professionals, wellness program managers, volunteers Victim Service Providers: professionals involved in services to people who have experienced sexual assault, child abuse/neglect, domestic violence, elder abuse, hate crimes, accidents, natural disasters Legal and Justice Community: police, investigators, legal advocates, prisons Journalists: editors

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Community meetings/Town halls, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently,

Financials

FOUNDATION FOR HUMAN ENRICHMENT
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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FOUNDATION FOR HUMAN ENRICHMENT

Board of directors
as of 03/11/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Rebecca Stahl

Executive Director of the Sayra and Neil Meyerhoff Center for Families, Children and the Courts at the University of Baltimore School of Law

Michele Solloway

Senior Scientist and Consultant for the SUNY Downstate College of Nursing in Brooklyn, NY

Michael Changaris

Clinical Psychologist

Sangeeta Fernandes

Director of the American Academy of Ophthalmic Executives

Sergio Ocampo

Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist

Carmen Casado

Somatic Experiencing Practitioner, Wellness Coach, and Yoga Therapist

Yadira Velazquez

Board-Certified Neurology and Clinical Neurophysiology Practitioner

Defne Erdur

Certified Body Therapist

R. Scott Palmer

Licensed Psychologist

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 3/11/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 04/20/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.