Animal related

FRONT RANGE EQUINE RESCUE

Ocala, FL   |  www.frontrangeequinerescue.org

Mission

TO PREVENT THE ABUSE AND NEGLECT OF HORSES THROUGH RESCUE AND EDUCATION

Ruling year info

1997

President

Hilary Wood

Executive Director

Marion Nagle

Main address

PO Box 458

Ocala, FL 34478 USA

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EIN

84-1418525

Cause area (NTEE code) info

Animal Related Activities N.E.C. (D99)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Front Range Equine Rescue works to end the abuse and neglect of horses through rescue and education. One of the most critical aspects of rescue work is to prevent abuse from occurring. This goal can be accomplished through direct rescue efforts, but education of new, potential and existing horse owners (and the general public) is the key to eliminating areas of abuse. Providing creative, yet practical solutions for horses is necessary to advance equine welfare. Examples include educating horse owners on safe means to re-home their horses; providing short-term assistance to horse owners during financial crisis or other disasters; determining other outlets for former competition horses for second careers instead of dumping into the slaughter pipeline; and utilizing safe and humane alternatives for wild horses other than roundups, warehousing in government pens, or slaughter.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Rescue

The rescue program removes horses from situations of abuse or neglect with emphasis on horses bound for slaughter. All horses go through rehabilitation, training assessment. The majority are available for adoption to qualified homes; others retire (sanctuary) with the rescue. Front Range Equine Rescue does both direct and indirect rescue -- indirect, for example, is temporary assistance during disasters like wildfires or feed/vet assistance during difficult economic times. Educational efforts on a local and national basis are included.

Population(s) Served
General/Unspecified
Budget
$950,000

From 2002-2016, this innovative program offered a partial reimbursement to horse owners for gelding their stud colts or stallions. Participants included individual horse owners, humane societies, and other rescue organizations. Not every horse needs to be bred; controlling the horse population can lead to a decrease in numbers of horses potentially neglected, abused or heading to slaughter. Currently this program offers assistance for veterinary clinics to host discounted gelding services to their clients and surrounding areas.

Population(s) Served
General/Unspecified
Budget
$15,000

In 2005, Front Range implemented its "save the wild horses" program to raise awareness of wild horse abuses (specifically roundups) and provide direct rescue of slaughter-bound mustangs. Legal efforts are also part of this critical effort which works to protect America's dwindling wild horse herds from further destruction by mismanagement practices.

Population(s) Served
General/Unspecified
Budget
$125,000

Since 1997, Front Range Equine Rescue has offered a variety of clinics and other events to improve horse owner responsibility and care. Education has been provided in equine nutrition, basic first aid, training, round pen work, safety on the trail, fire evacuation, communication with horses, wild horse issues, re-homing horses safely, trailer loading, and natural horsemanship. A series of educational brochures on various horse topics is also available. Summer youth camps run annually (no riding) which include the care and keeping of horses and "hanging with horses". Half or full day mini clinics run as needed often for special group requests such as Girl Scouts, church groups or recreational summer camp groups. A direct mail program informs supporters of Front Range's program efforts, needs and horse abuse issues. FRER uses social media (Facebook, Instagram, Twitter) and its website to provide updates on horse issues and FRER's programs and activities as well as a direct mail program.

Population(s) Served
General/Unspecified
Budget
$195,000

Approximately 1% of America's horses are slaughtered for human consumption each year in foreign slaughterhouses. U.S. horses are not raised as a food animal. They are given numerous products and medications over the course of their lives which are banned for use in food animals. There is significant cruelty involved with horses being transported to slaughter as well as the actual killing being inhumane. Front Range Equine Rescue is a leader in working to responsibly end horse slaughter. This program involves education, advocacy, legal actions at the state and federal level, direct rescue of slaughter-bound horses, and promoting the many solutions to horse slaughter.

Population(s) Served
General/Unspecified
Budget
$125,000

Where we work

Charting impact

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

Front Range Equine Rescue's mission is to end the abuse and neglect of horses through rescue and education. While rescue is critical to each horse in a situation of abuse (often life threatening), it aids one horse at a time. While numbers add up over the course of rescuing horses over the years, this angle is limited by funding, shelter space, and the number of people available to provide responsible care year round, every day of the year. From its beginning in 1997, Front Range also implemented an educational/advocacy program. To make change in how horses are treated and cared for comes with knowledge of responsible horse care practices. Front Range has offered clinics, seminars, a newsletter, educational brochures, website, Facebook page, direct mail program, email alerts, petition drives, and various events to reach out to both horse owners and the general (horse-loving) public to help create the change needed to decrease/end horse abuse. Front Range has teamed up with animal control agencies over the years to strengthen their ability (which often lacks) in removing horses from abusive situations as another means to achieve its goal. Creating working partnerships in the horse industry with trainers, other educators, horse-related companies and organizations, vets, farriers and similar enables Front Range to unite people in the common cause to improve horse care/management practices. Front Range has also provided innovative, short-term solutions in emergency situations. For example, running a feed/vet assistance program for responsible horse owners during difficult economic times, allowed good owners to keep their horses instead of neglecting them, or sending them into the slaughter pipeline (intentionally or not). Solving horse abuse must have short and long-term strategies which Front Range has always used in its program goals/efforts.

Ways in which Front Range Equine Rescue works to end horse abuse include a rescue and educational program. The rescue program takes in horses from abusive situations and brings them back to health. The majority are adopted to qualified new homes; others remain in a retired herd at the rescue. Special programs include "stop the backyard breeder" (gelding reimbursement); trails end (humane euthanasia reimbursement); re-homing tips; short-term owner assistance for hay/vet services in tough economic times; fire/disaster evacuation assistance; and referrals for service providers. Front Range also engages in legal action as needed to protect America's wild horses and to responsibly end horse slaughter. Educationally, Front Range provides annual events to keep horse owners and horse enthusiasts informed of horse abuse issues, responsible horse care including the time and financial commitment needed. Front Range also provides ways to become involved with horses other than ownership. FRER's website, Facebook page, direct mail campaign, email alerts, and newsletter provide basic and updated information on equine abuse issues and Front Range's work.

Front Range Equine Rescue began in Colorado and over time grew to assisting horses in other parts of the country (e.g., the "three strikes" mustang cruelty case in NE; helping kill lot horses in OK). In 2014, Front Range expanded its direct rescue program to the East Coast helping horses in VA and from surrounding states. During 2015 Front Range relocated its headquarters to Ocala, FL while maintaining efforts in CO and the West via Board members and a long-standing partnership with another CO rescue. Since 2003, Front Range has reached tens of thousands of people via a direct mail program which both educates and raises much needed funds for program efforts. Front Range also works with one of the top animal lawyers in the U.S. on its highly successful legal endeavors to responsibly end horse slaughter and work to protect America's dwindling wild horse herds. Educational efforts are coordinated between FRER's President and Education/Event Coordinator to ensure appropriate topics are covered and ways to engage the public in helping to end horse abuse effectively presented.

Progress is measured by the actual number of horses removed each year from abusive situations; successful rehabilitation and adoption; provided humane euthanasia when quality of life is diminished with no change for a pain-free existence; horses re-homed safely by owners based on FRER's guidance; participants in special programs - stop the backyard breeder and trails end; and when needed horse owner assistance, short-term programs or emergency situations such as wildfire evacuation and support.<br/>At the educational level, success is seen by participation at events, follow up involvement in volunteering, referral of others to educational programs, petition drives, adoption or sponsoring, level of donations received to support program efforts, and those who continue to carry the message for supporting an end to equine abuse. For example, participants at youth camps have gone on to take riding lessons, attend horse-related events, work with a trainer and eventually own a horse. Other supporters have taken copies of petitions (e.g., to end wild horse roundups) and obtained additional signatures. Donors send matching gift opportunities from their employers to help boost financial support of program efforts and others include Front Range Equine Rescue in their estate planning to help ensure the future for critical program work to continue.

Front Range Equine Rescue has helped thousands of horses through its rescue (direct and indirect) efforts. The educational program has impacted countless other horses as Front Range has reached tens of thousands of people via events, mailers, email, Facebook, and referrals to instruct on horse abuse issues and solutions. Front Range's legal efforts in 2012-2013 were significant in preventing the return of horse slaughter plants to the U.S. FRER has been part of legal action to end wild horse roundups; a 2009 lawsuit stopped the zero out of a herd in Colorado. Hundreds of horses were safe during wildfires in Colorado when Front Range provided services such as transport to safety, feed, supplies and vet care at evacuation sites. Hundreds of horses have been part of the stop the backyard breeder program to help curb over-population issues; and dozens of owners have received financial help when needing to make the decision to humanely euthanize a horse in a poor quality of life. Several hundred horses have been assisted when Front Range provided short-term feed/vet care during the Great Recession with a horse owner assistance program.<br/>While it is impossible to fully achieve an end to horse abuse, it can be greatly curtailed with rescue and educational programs. While there are also numerous obstacles to overcome to ban horse slaughter in the U.S. and keep America's horses from slaughter across the borders, it is not an impossible task once politicians and special interests learn the alternatives to slaughter and the legal ramifications of sending an animal not raised for food into the human food chain. Wild horse issues are also a significant challenge, but change can be made. Progress is slow but small inroads to keeping wild horses on the public lands designated to them have been made (e.g., use of fertility control to manage populations). Ultimately one organization cannot do it all, but all have a part to play. Front Range has been a role model and leader in the horse rescue community and fully intends to continue its efforts.

Financials

FRONT RANGE EQUINE RESCUE
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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This organization has no recorded board members.

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes

Keywords

horse rescue, equine rescue