PLATINUM2023

Hope House Colorado

Empowering teen moms

aka Hope House Colorado   |   Arvada, CO   |  http://www.hopehousecolorado.org

Mission

Hope House Colorado empowers parenting teenage moms to strive for personal and economic self-sufficiency and to understand their significance in God's sight, resulting in a healthy future for them and for their children.

Ruling year info

2001

Founder & Executive Director

Ms. Lisa Steven

Main address

6475 Benton Street BLDG A

Arvada, CO 80003 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

84-1567838

NTEE code info

Family Services (Adolescent Parents) (P45)

Youth Development Programs (O50)

Temporary Shelter For the Homeless (L41)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Hope House programs empower parenting teen moms to break the cycle of generational poverty for teen moms living in the Denver-metro area; other issues addressed include abuse, neglect, and a lack of education. A surprising 67% of teen moms live below the poverty line; only half will graduate from high school; less than 2% will earn a college degree. Furthermore, teen moms striving to break the cycle of poverty usually have a limited vocabulary and lack the ability to communicate with standard word choice. These deficiencies are passed on to their children -- which means both generations lack the language abilities necessary to succeed in school. In fact, children of teen parents are 50% more likely to repeat a grade and are less likely to graduate from high school. This is a significant problem because education is key in breaking out of poverty.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Hope House Housing Support Program

The Housing Support Program provides metro-Denver’s only Residential Program where parenting teen moms can live and work on self-sufficiency with the goal of obtaining stable, long-term housing for themselves and their child(ren). The program also provides housing support through partnerships with low income and transitional housing communities, while remaining updated on the Colorado housing market and upcoming housing opportunities.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls
At-risk youth

Our College & Career Program is designed to help our teen moms succeed in college and in their chosen career path, providing practical tools and support including advising, tutoring for any kind of class, computer/printer access, educational workshops and more. It is our goal to help our teen moms find jobs that pay a wage that will allow them to be self-sufficient and independent of government assistance.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls
At-risk youth

Our High School & GED Program allows teen moms to choose the program that works best for them: GED prep, HiSET prep or Penn Foster, our online high school diploma option for those teen moms that are eligible. This unique program features one-on-one instruction and tutoring versus a traditional classroom model and is structured to allow participants to move at their own pace, which is crucial since each teen mom has a unique educational background. Hope House covers the cost of the GED, Penn Foster and HiSET testing, provides testing onsite and offers transportation as able.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls
At-risk youth

The Early Learning & School Age Program focuses on literacy and social-emotional development; early intervention services; and school-age supports for the children; and provides a Parenting Program for teen moms. Children in early learning, ages 3-months to 5½, utilize the evidence based Little InvestiGators curriculum. This curriculum is an integrative, child-focused approach that encourages children to explore the world around them to enhance communication, gross motor, fine motor, problem solving and personal-social skills. Teachers work collaboratively with teen moms to ensure that children are meeting important developmental milestones across all five learning domains. School-age children, ages 5 to 10, are supported through literacy, after-school tutoring and extracurricular activities. The goal is to help the children of our teen moms develop the skills they need to succeed in school and show our teen moms what quality child care looks like.

Population(s) Served
Infants and toddlers
Economically disadvantaged people

We offer programing that specializes in increasing our teen moms’ self-awareness because this is an essential part of self-sufficiency. We utilize the PAIRIN survey, a self-reporting instrument that provides comprehensive results on soft skills and mindsets, to provide individualized coaching in essential areas such as stress tolerance and adaptability. Additional classes and community activities help teen moms overcome many of the barriers associated with generational poverty. When self-awareness grows, self-confidence flourishes, which positively impacts all other aspects of their life. The personal growth educator also teaches classes on care-for-self, communication, personal support systems, attitude, and integrity that all strengthen a mom’s soft skills as she grows in personal self-sufficiency domains.

Population(s) Served
At-risk youth
Women and girls

Hope House offers teen moms an interactive, engaging parenting education through classes and one-on-one guidance. Our Parenting 101 class is based on Nurturing Parents Program for Teen Parents, a nationally recognized curriculum, as well as topic-based, teacher-led discussions. We offer a range of other classes, including a support group for teen moms who have children with special needs, age-specific parenting sessions and individual coaching.

Population(s) Served
At-risk youth
Women and girls

Where we work

Awards

Everyday Hero 2015

7 news everyday hero award

Governor's Service Award 2015

Colorado Governor Bill Ritter

Nonprofit Organization of the Year 2018

Arvada Chamber of Commerce

Affiliations & memberships

Association of Fundraising Professionals - Member

Chamber of Commerce 2016

Chamber of Commerce 2017

Chamber of Commerce 2018

Chamber of Commerce 2019

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of youth who demonstrate motivation to learn

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls, Adolescents, Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Our teen moms demonstrate motivation to learn because they attend voluntarily and are not court-ordered to attend. All of our programs include educational classes, from GED to College/Career and more.

Number of clients participating in educational programs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls, Adolescents, Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Educational programs include but are not limited to High School & GED, College & Career, Mental Health Supports, Personal Growth, Parenting, Financial Literacy and Job Readiness workshops.

Number of personal development plans in place

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls, Adolescents, Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

In order to best support our teen moms as they work toward economic self-sufficiency, our program team works with them to create individual Economic and Personal Self-Sufficiency continuums.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Clearly there is a significant need for programs that help struggling teen moms become self-sufficient and build healthy community. For this reason, the overall goal of Hope House is to provide free self-sufficiency programming that equip teen moms for long-term economic and personal self-sufficiency through the development of skills and knowledge, via the following goals:

• Continue to offer services to 250 teen moms (ages 15-25) who participate in Hope House Programming.

• Complete construction of a new Early Learning Center (2024) adjacent to the Hope House Resource Center (which was completely finished in 2019 following a successful $5 million Capital Campaign) in order to increase the number of teen moms and children served at Hope House each year.

• Expand upon current measuring tools to improve reporting and to develop new measurement tools that can be housed in an easy-to-use application to best communicate growth of teen moms in the Personal and Economic Self-sufficiency Continuum.

• Expand local partnerships with organizations that provide direct services for teen moms that are not currently provided by Hope House.

• Contribute to a healthier local community; every time one of our teen moms reaches self-sufficiency, Colorado tax payers save approximately $49,000 annually -- and the cycle of welfare dependency is much more likely to be broken once the mother reaches self-sufficiency because two generations have been transformed.

• Create a safe place for teen moms to develop healthy community with staff, volunteers and other teen moms.

Hope House is metro-Denver's only resource providing free self-sufficiency programs to teen moms; programs are offered to support teen moms in nine personal domains and six economic domains:

We offer a variety of components designed to help teen moms become self-sufficient members of their community who are also nurturing, loving parents. We offer a menu-style approach to services that allows our teen moms to define their own goals and then select the components that will help them reach those goals.

Components include:

• Parenting Classes
• Relationships Classes & Certified Counseling
• Personal Growth Classes
• Health & Wellness
• Activities & Events
• High School & GED Program
• College & Career Program
• Mental Health Supports
• Economic Support
• Legal Advocacy
• Housing Support Program
• Early Learning & School Age Program (for children of active teen moms)

To accomplish its mission, Hope House relies on numerous volunteers and local business partnerships. In 2022, 401 volunteers donated 5,667 hours of free service.

After more than 20 years of offering self-sufficiency programs to teen moms, Hope House Colorado has become a recognized expert in our field. This is evidenced in many ways, including the fact that in 2015 Hope House received the Governor's Service Award for Outstanding Nonprofit Organization in Colorado and was named the 2018 Nonprofit of the Year by the Arvada Chamber of Commerce. Additionally, our staff is highly qualified in terms of both experience and education.

It should also be noted that Lisa Steven, our Executive Director, is also the Founder of Hope House, which adds to the depth of the organization. Lisa has over 25 years of experience working with teen moms. She is a co-founder of the Colorado Teen Parent Collaborative and is active with the Denver Women's Leadership Forum. Lisa serves on the Board of Directors for the Arvada Chamber of Commerce and has received several awards, including the Arvada Woman of the Year and Outstanding Women of Jefferson County. Her connections, experience and leadership skills all contribute to the organization's capabilities.

Deep partnerships, which Hope House staff members have worked hard to create, also serve to strengthen our organizational capabilities. In 2015, through the GED Task Force, we partnered with other nonprofit organizations to successfully advocate for educational legislation that removed a significant barrier to self-sufficiency for teen moms and other individuals working to break the cycle of poverty. We also partner with various agencies that help our teen moms obtain housing, medical care, legal assistance regarding parenting orders and more. We are highly intentional in terms of the services we provide, and careful to not duplicate services provided by other organizations.

Hope House also has the financial capabilities to meet our goals. With a budget of over $2.9 million, Hope House has joined the top 10 percent of nonprofit organizations in the United States. Our financial stability is largely due to the fact that we enjoy a large, grassroots support base. In fact, individual donors have historically proven to be the largest source of income for Hope House, which means the organization is not dependent on a specific individual or organization for financial support. We continually work to increase our donor base, and every year, as our income has grown, so has our donor base in terms of number of donors and total donations.

The fact that we have a large volunteer base also adds to our capabilities. Since Hope House opened its doors in 2003, the number of volunteers and the volunteer hours donated has grown every year. In 2022, 401 volunteers donated 5,667 hours of service to Hope House, which is valued at $194,718.12, according to the Independent Sector.

In order to help at-risk teen moms receive the education and support necessary to land employment at a wage that provides enough income to meet basic needs without public assistance, Hope House opened its Residential Program in 2003. To date, this program has served 100 formerly homeless or at-risk teen moms and their children with a high rate of success.

Demand for services for teen moms increased every year, with staff receiving approximately 150 crisis calls annually from teen moms and service providers. In response, we launched additional Hope House Programs in 2007, which included a GED Program in 2009, and supportive services such as Parenting and Healthy Relationships Programs, certified counseling and life skills classes.

In 2012, we opened our Resource Center, moving all Hope House Programs, including our GED Program, to this new location. The house now hosts the Residential Program only; this 12-bedroom home provides our moms up to a week of respite care, up to nine months of transitional housing or up to two years of comprehensive programming. In 2013 we launched a College & Career Program, and in 2014 we piloted our new Early Learning Program for the kids of Hope House teen moms. To date, Hope House has served over 1,000 disadvantaged teen moms and 1,500 children.

In 2015 Hope House successfully helped create the Teen Parent Collaborative, a local, unified community of organizations driven by the strength of teen parents to raise public awareness, share resources and advocate for public policy that benefits teen parents and their children.

Because the demand for services for teen moms is so high, Hope House launched a capital campaign to build a new Resource Center that was completed in 2019. This expansion allows the organization to double the number of teen moms and children served annually.

Hope House is also still in the process of building national as well as international partnerships and forming a national affiliation of organizations that serve teen moms. Senior staff is also investigating the options for creating an income stream for Hope House through social enterprise.

In 2022 we expanded our Residential Program into a full Housing Support Program, which includes our Residential Program. This program is an immediate disturbance to homelessness and supports teen moms as they create Individual Growth Plans with an eventual goal of being able to afford market-based housing. We also expanded our Early Learning program into an Early Learning & School Age Program to more comprehensively serve the school-age children of our teen moms who need additional social and literacy support. 

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time

Financials

Hope House Colorado
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Hope House Colorado

Board of directors
as of 05/17/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mrs. Jennifer Zertuche

FirstBank

Term: 2022 - 2026

John Steven

J & D Machine Technology, Cofounder of Hope House of Colorado

Brian Bess

Enduring Resources

Jennifer Zertuche

FirstBank

Steve Reynolds

Infinity Oil & Gas

Lee Fawcett

Primrose Schools

Paul Snyder

American West Construction

Chris Johnson

Effective Soft

Brian Sump

Avalon Motors, Urban Auto

Wayne Anderson

Leadership Science Institute

Alicia Quintana

WAXIE Sanitary Supply, Hope House Alumni

Karla Nugent

Weifield Group Contracting

Steve Prokopiak

Retired Engineer

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 5/2/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 08/17/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.