PLATINUM2023

Project C.U.R.E. / Benevolent Healthcare Foundation

Delivering Health and Hope to the World

aka Project C.U.R.E.   |   Centennial, CO   |  www.projectcure.org

Mission

Project C.U.R.E. identifies, solicits, collects, sorts, and distributes medical supplies and services according to the imperative needs of the world. Project C.U.R.E. was founded in 1987 to address the staggering shortage of medical resources around the world. Since our humble beginnings in a garage in Colorado, Project C.U.R.E. has become the world’s largest distributor of donated medical supplies, equipment and services to doctors and nurses serving the sick and dying in more than 135 countries. Project C.U.R.E. is supported by over 30,000 volunteers annually and operates distribution warehouses in seven U.S. cities.

Ruling year info

2001

President & CEO

Dr. W. Douglas Jackson Ph.D.

Main address

10377 E. Geddes Ave. Ste. 200

Centennial, CO 80112 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

84-1568566

NTEE code info

International Relief (Q33)

Disaster Preparedness and Relief Services (M20)

Recycling (C27)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2023, 2022 and 2021.
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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

C.U.R.E. Cargo

Sends ocean-going cargo containers of medical supplies and equipment to hospitals, clinics and health centers in resource-limited communities in developing countries.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Adults

Individuals, community service groups and corporate teams volunteer to collect, sort and inspect medical donations received and pack outbound cargo containers.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Adults

48-pound kits of basic medical supplies that international travelers can check as luggage and hand-deliver to clinics in need abroad.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Adults

Volunteer teams of medical professionals from the U.S. travel abroad to provide free care to patients and train in-country healthcare staff in resource-limited communities.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Adults

Small kits of personal hygiene and first aid items in a reusable drawstring bag for families in resource-limited communities in developing countries so parents can care for minor injuries and encourage handwashing at home.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Where we work

Accreditations

4-Star - Charity Navigator 2019

4-Star - Charity Navigator 2021

Awards

CLASSY Award - West Region Charity of the Year 2012

Stay Classy

People's Choice Award 2021

Classy

Prince Albert II of Monaco Prize for Innovative Philanthropy 2020

Prince Albert II of Monaco

Leadership in Global Engagement 2020

Denver Council of Foreign Relations

Interaction Governance Service Award 2019

Interaction

HRH Crown Princess Katherine Foundation Humanitarian Award 2018

HRH Crown Princess Katherine Foundation

Recognition Award from State Government of Sinaloa, Mexico 2017

State Government of Sinaloa, Mexico

Service to Mankind District Award, Sertoma 2015

Service to Mankind District Award, Sertoma

Recognition from government of Valparaiso, Mexico 2013

Recognition from government of Valparaiso, Mexico

Affiliations & memberships

InterAction - Member 2013

PQMD - Board Member 2018

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of containers full of medical supplies shipped.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Economically disadvantaged people, Children and youth, Families, Refugees and displaced people

Related Program

C.U.R.E. Cargo

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

Delivered 183 forty foot container shipments in medical supplies and equipment to 48 countries.

Number of healthcare professionals volunteering on primary care clinics.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

C.U.R.E. Clinics

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, international C.U.R.E. Clinics were suspended. We hope to resume these in 2022.

Number of people trained

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls

Related Program

C.U.R.E. Clinics

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, international C.U.R.E. Clinics were suspended. We hope to resume these in 2022.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Project C.U.R.E. aims to strengthen the healthcare infrastructure of medical facilities around the globe. In partnership with 350 US hospitals and manufacturers, Project C.U.R.E. helps to green their supply chain by ensuring that lifesaving medical equipment reaches end users around the globe. Because Project C.U.R.E. works through partners that are already on the ground, overhead costs are less than 2%. This fiscal efficiency enables Project C.U.R.E. to maximize the amount of medical supplies and equipment that is distributed globally.

Further, Project C.U.R.E. seeks to enhance the healthcare field with the provision of training programs for midwives, community health workers, traditional birthing attendants and biomedical technicians. Through these programs, Project C.U.R.E. supports the Ministry of Health's goals to create a robust healthcare workforce in each of the countries where trainings are held.

Project C.U.R.E was the medical supply provider for Saving Mothers, Giving Life, a five-year initiative to reduce alarmingly high maternal and newborn mortality rates in Uganda and Zambia. The effort is co-led by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, Every Mother Counts, the Government of Norway, Merck for Mothers and USAID. Project C.U.R.E. is receiving $1.8 million over four years to conduct Needs Assessments and deliver 40 containers to facilities in need in these two countries. Project C.U.R.E. is seeking private and corporate partners to double the impact of the grant with matching containers. Since the grant began, the partner communities have seen a 50% reduction in maternal deaths, a highly significant outcome and even higher than anticipated. In 2015, CEO and President, Doug Jackson, traveled to Uganda to participate in a conference for the SMGL NGO's and received news from nurses from Zambia that Project C.U.R.E.'s shipments had transformed their hospitals and saved lives. In fact, the SMGL program has been so significantly impacting maternal health that it will be expanding its scope into Nigeria as well in the upcoming year.

Further support is offered through both the Kits for Kids program and the CURE Kits program. Kits for Kids is a small backpack packed in the US and filled with basic medical supplies such as bandages, Neosporin, and tweezers that is given to a child during a community health workshop, parents are taught how to use the supplies and children keep the backpack for school. The CURE Kits program is a airplane ready bag packed with medical supplies for first responders, for example when the earthquake hit Nepal in 2015, Project C.U.R.E. immediately distributed the CURE Kits to first responders who were able to use them on flight for life helicopters as well as on the ground to save lives.

Health systems in developing countries are overburdened and fragmented. Health systems must be strengthened to meet the current and upcoming burden of disease and infection that weaken the social and economic fabric within communities. While there are many aspects to health system strengthening, an essential component is the provision of high-quality medical supplies and technology that equip healthcare providers with the tools necessary to provide a broad range of healthcare interventions and increase access for the most vulnerable.

Project C.U.R.E. works diligently to support both the medical supply and equipment and human resource needs of facilities who have requested assistance from Project C.U.R.E. This model is a sustainable 'pull' model because medical professionals around the globe initiate the request and Project C.U.R.E. then supports those exact needs following a customized needs assessment of every facility.

The needs assessment is the hallmark of Project C.U.R.E.'s model and sets us apart from other organizations who offer medical supplies and equipment. Because the needs assessment is an in depth interview of medical staff, a customized packing list is tailored for that facility's exact needs. If the facility is in need of a surgical suite or a maternity ward, Project C.U.R.E. responds to support those needs.

Our strategy for achieving our goals is to continue building upon the successful CURE Cargo program, the Kits for Kids and CURE Kits programs and enhancing our training programs through a variety of offerings for CURE College.

Project C.U.R.E. is the world's largest distributor of donated medical supplies. Due to the success of the CURE Cargo program, Project C.U.R.E. has built extensive networks of partnerships all around the globe.

Since 1987 Project C.U.R.E. has equipped thousands of resource-poor medical facilities in over 130 developing countries with desperately needed medical supplies and modern equipment. Typically, it costs Project C.U.R.E. approximately $25,000 to provide an average of $350,000 worth of customized, donated medical supplies and equipment on average. The cost of each project varies with destination and other factors. Project C.U.R.E.'s approach adheres to World Health Organization's (WHO) medical equipment and supply donation guidelines.

Needs Assessment Department:
1. Conducts initial vetting
2. If yes, Needs Assessment is scheduled

Needs Assessment, In-Country:
1. Determine medical facility needs
2. Advise on customs clearance

Operations Department:
1. Supply chain management
2. Procurement and quality control

Distribution Center:
Medical supplies and equipment pulled and prepared for delivery, per direction of the Operations Department

Post-Project Follow Up:
1. Monitoring and Evaluation survey
2. Post Assessment, as requested by sponsor
extensive government relations within the recipient nation; and, (4) a post assessment to ensure the medical supplies and equipment are being used properly.

This extensive process has enabled Project C.U.R.E. to partner with some of the world's most influential partners in global health including DHAPP, USAID, the Government of Norway, Great Britain, numerous Ministers of Health and First Ladies, Fortune 500 corporations, such as Merck, and international development NGOs, such as World Vision, John Snow Inc., Abt Associates, Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation, and other development organizations.

Project C.U.R.E. serves on the Board of Directors of InterAction, the leading international development trade association, and serves on the Board of Directors of Saving Mothers, Giving Life, a Hillary Rodham Clinton initiated partnership to reduce maternal mortality rates by 50% in Uganda, Zambia, and soon to be in Nigeria.

Finally, Project C.U.R.E. operates on 2% administrative overhead and in 2011, Forbes magazine ranked Project C.U.R.E. as one of the 20 most cost effective nonprofit organizations in the United States. Each year, Project C.U.R.E. hires independent auditors to conduct both performance and financial GAAP certified audits. Project C.U.R.E.'s IRS 990 form and its annual report are available online.

Over the 2020/21 fiscal year:

• Sent 183 containers shipped to 48 countries on 5 continents.
• The most containers EVER shipped in the history of Project C.U.R.E., valued at over $60 million in donated medical equipment and supplies.
• Delivered an average of $380,000 worth of donated goods per 40-foot cargo container

Inaugural shipments of domestic aid to fight COVID-19 — each of our U.S. distribution centers specifically met needs of local clinics, providers, even major hospitals within our C.U.R.E. Communities
• Over $4 Million of Domestic PPE Aid
• 18,000 cartons of masks, gloves, gowns, and face shields
• 575 U.S. facilities served
• 540 shipments
• 15 Semi-truck trailers

Volunteer Metrics:
• 3,814 people volunteered with us for the very first time.
• 256 volunteers logged over 100 hours for the FY.
• 30 individuals volunteered over 100 times.
• 60% of all volunteers came back to volunteer with us again.

• Opened a seventh U.S. distribution center in Kansas City.

Project C.U.R.E. has worked diligently over the past year to meet some of the world's most challenging global health crises.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection

Financials

Project C.U.R.E. / Benevolent Healthcare Foundation
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Project C.U.R.E. / Benevolent Healthcare Foundation

Board of directors
as of 06/02/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Thomas Malley

Mossrock Capital, LLC

Term: 2025 - 2021

Richard Campbell

Campbell, Bohn, Killin, Brittan & Ray LLC

W. Douglas Jackson

Project C.U.R.E.

James Jackson

Project C.U.R.E.

Brad Lidge

Philadelphia Phillies

Charlie Fote

CKJK Corporation

Bruce Schroffel

University of Colorado Hospital

Gary Goldberg

BHP

Daniel Yohannes

OECD

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Not applicable
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 5/22/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

Transgender Identity

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 01/11/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.