GOLD2023

Strategy for Access Foundation NFP

All that's fun for the ability challenged!

CHICAGO, IL   |  https://www.fun4thedisabled.com/

Mission

Strategy for Access’ mission is to provide educational and entertaining documentary subjects and inspiring stories for the disability community so that they can become aware that they are an integral part of a much larger global society and that they have much to share, not in spite of their disability, but because of who they are.

Ruling year info

2019

Principal Officer

Vanessa Harris

Main address

4800 S CHICAGO BEACH DR APT 1707S

CHICAGO, IL 60615 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

84-1759186

NTEE code info

Disabled Persons' Rights (R23)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990-N.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Strategy for Access Foundation is a non-profit organization that prioritizes advocacy for people with visible and invisible disabilities. The organization envisions to create an understanding that people with disabilities contribute to the global community in numerous ways and that they are assets to the society.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Fun4theDisabled

Fun4thedisabled is a disability vlog about people, products, organizations, events, and accessible activities for people with ability challenges and their friends and families of all ages to enjoy themselves.

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities

Where we work

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The organization is aiming to raise awareness not just to the challenges of the disability community, but also to all the ways they help contribute to society. Strategy for Access tries to adopt the idea that people with disabilities are not liabilities to their communities, but rather assets.

Fun4thedisabled being its main platform, the organization creates inspiring and educative content. The content is created through interviews with people from around the world, as well as some personal stories from the members of the organization. Strategy for Access also partners with universities and other helpful parties to extend its reach.

Strategy for Access has a strong and dedicated team with related capabilities, creating content serving the organization’s goals. It uses a number of internet-based audiovisual tools to raise awareness to its cause, such as videos, blog posts, and podcasts. In this process, its primary resources are DSLR cameras with various capabilities, professional photography, video, and audio editing software. The videos are closed-captioned for the hearing impaired and the transcripts are also provided for the visually impaired. The organization also produces a newsletter, sent out by email, that has an increasing number of subscribers.

Since its establishment a year ago, Strategy for Access managed to reach a growing number of 5000 subscribers to its newsletter. Some of its video content has been viewed by more than 400 viewers. In addition, a Board of Directors has been successfully formed to better achieve the organization’s goals. The next milestone for Strategy for Access will be to get funding. Furthermore, in spring 2020, the organization is partnering with a university professor, who will implement Google Analytics to Strategy for Access’ web platform as a class project, to measure its effectiveness in terms of the number of organic users and digital marketing in general. In terms of the creative content creation, the organization is planning to launch multiple web series about mental illness and the wheelchair and insurance industry.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    We have all types of disabilities, both visible and invisible, chronic illnesses, mental health diagnoses, intellectual and developmental disabilities, etc. We are the Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing; the Blind or have Low Vision; people with speech disability; those with mobility; and those with sensory issues including autism spectrum disorder. Our base also includes family and friends, allies in the disability industry, and those that wish to learn about us. We recognize the urgency of an unmet need.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We prioritize adaptability, as observed through our program changes during the pandemic. At the quarantine’s onset, people with disabilities (PWD) experienced a unique fear and anxiety because we lacked resources for our specific needs. We recognize that we, as the disabled community, have become problem solvers out of necessity and are comfortable with generating solutions to complex problems. PWD are more susceptible to being seriously affected due to personal health or institutional issues.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    It has improved our ability to develop effective programs for our audience resulting in a better revenue stream.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback,

Financials

Strategy for Access Foundation NFP
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Strategy for Access Foundation NFP

Board of directors
as of 01/19/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Vanessa Harris

Tony Smith

Victoria Harris

Richard Harris

Patricia Harris

Autumn Wilke

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? No
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 1/19/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or straight
Disability status
Person with a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 02/18/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.