Global Mentorship Initiative

Connecting students to careers through mentorship.

aka GMI   |   Bellevue, WA   |  https://globalmentorship.org

Mission

Global Mentorship Initiative provides guidance and business skills to college students through online mentorship. GMI was created from the Rockefeller Foundation’s Digital Jobs Initiative to help prepare students for their first career job using a training model that makes it easy for business professionals to be great mentors.

Ruling year info

2019

CEO

Jon Browning

Main address

15600 NE 8th St Suite B1-800

Bellevue, WA 98008 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

84-1892894

NTEE code info

Youth Development Programs (O50)

Employment Procurement Assistance and Job Training (J20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Global Mentorship Initiative is a non-profit organization that provides guidance and business skills to less privileged college students through online mentorship. GMI was created from the Rockefeller Foundation’s Digital Jobs Africa Initiative to help prepare students for their first career job using a training model that makes it easy for business professionals to be great mentors. Why Mentoring is Important Having a college degree alone doesn’t mean a student is prepared for their first professional job. 45% of university graduates in Africa are jobless one year after graduation. In the US, two thirds of graduating students struggle to launch their careers. Many schools worldwide do not incorporate curriculum to teach the skills students need to be successful in their first few years of work. GMI’s mentorship program helps bridge the gap by providing students with experienced mentors who coach them on these vital business skills.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Mentorship for underserved students

GMI's mentoring program provides students with guidance and business skills for job opportunities when they graduate. College students are matched with a business professional who leads them through a 14 session business preparation course to enable them to find and succeed in their first career job.

Population(s) Served
Students
Young adults

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of mentors recruited

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The GMI mentorship program launched in March 2020 after a pilot in 2019.

Number of youth mentored

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Young adults

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of clients who complete job skills training

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Young adults

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

GMI mentorship program launched in March 2020.

Number of colleges providing students for mentorship

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Young adults

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of countries where students are located

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

GMI partners with universities to identify less privileged students who are eager to start their careers. GMI also partners with companies to find experienced business professionals who are eager to share their knowledge.

Prospective mentors are screened and interviewed to ensure the match will be a good fit. Mentors receive training on the GMI mentorship program curriculum, so they know exactly how to help their students.

Students are more competitive job candidates because of GMI training. Students are interviewed by local companies for jobs. Mentors may also introduce students to job opportunities.

GMI mentoring programs provide students with role models to provide guidance, business skills, and job opportunities when they graduate. Mentors guide their students through the mentorship program via remote teleconference. The mentor and the student meet on a regular schedule for 14 sessions. Mentors follow a specific program track to ensure students receive the full benefit of mentorship with a business professional.

What Students Learn in the Mentorship
- Establishing a professional business network using LinkedIn
- Developing specific soft skills to excel in business
- Communication strategy for a global business environment
- Creating a career plan and setting measurable goals
- Creating a resume/CV that gets noticed using keywords
- Templates and guides for conducting a job search
- Mastering the job interview process –answering tough questions
- How companies evaluate their employees and how to distinguish yourself on the job

GMI works with corporate partners and universities to provide a supply of mentors and students for the GMI program. GMI can scale to 1000+ mentorships per year using the current model.

GMI has provided LinkedIn training to 400 graduating students and job seekers in South Africa and the US in 2019/20. These students create professional profiles with content and keywords designed to attract job recruiters.

Currently, GMI has over 300 people in the mentorship program. GMI is working with corporate sponsors to create opportunities for students in 10 colleges based in the US, South Africa, and Sri Lanka.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Underserved college students in 57 countries.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person),

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    GMI continually updates the mentorship program materials based on mentor and mentee feedback to improve effectiveness.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    GMI's mentor and mentee satisfaction rates are above 95% and this is due in part to our continuous feedback process for improvement.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

Global Mentorship Initiative
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Global Mentorship Initiative

Board of directors
as of 06/09/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Jon Browning

Global Mentorship Initiative

Term: 2021 - 2023

Jocelyn Azada

Nielsen

Jan Clausen

PSE

Thomas McGuire

Genpact

Mamadou Biteye

African Capacity Building Foundation

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Not applicable
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Not applicable

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 6/9/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Gender identity
Male

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 06/09/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.