Darryl Chappell Foundation

Empowering Afrodescendant Artists s to Achieve Their Highest Potential

Washington, DC   |  https://darrylchappellfoundation.org
This organization is a 501(c)(3) Private Nonoperating Foundation (This organization has notified the IRS of its intention to convert to a public charity, and the IRS has ruled that grantors and contributors may consider it a public charity for the purpose of making contributions to the organization.).

Mission

Purpose Statement The Darryl Chappell Foundation empowers Afrodescendant artists to achieve their highest potential. We accomplish this by sponsoring artist-in-residence programs, by facilitating an Artists Talk series, by curating an online Artist Marketplace featuring artists and their work for sale, and by funding public commissioned art through the Fund for Community Art program. Mission To empower artists to achieve their highest potential Vision To establish a community of artists who are positively impacting their local communities in new, exciting, and mind-altering ways through art.

Notes from the nonprofit

Listening intently to the needs of artists is intertwined in everything that we do. We discuss the needs of artists using their voice as we develop programs. We include artists as board directors, as strategic advisors, and as non-board director committee members.

Ruling year info

2020

Chairman & CEO

Darryl Chappell

Co-Chair

Molly Brown

Main address

1899 L Street NW, Suite 850

Washington, DC 20036 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

84-2779916

NTEE code info

Arts, Cultural Organizations - Multipurpose (A20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990-PF.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Aspiring artists (nascent, emerging or established) of African descent do not have adequate resources nor informed, connected mentors, to achieve their highest potential as self-sustaining artists on the world stage. The absence of adequate resources (financial, network connections) and mentorship (trusted advisors) blocks the visibility of career trajectory of Afrodescendant artists.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Artist-in-Residence (3 residency programs)

The Foundation supports three Artist-in-Residence Programs, one in Puerto Rico at the Museo de Arte de Puerto Rico, one at Light Work in Syracuse, New York, and a third residence at the Ogden Museum of Southern Art in New Orleans
a) complete art project and exhibition
b) advance education and professional development of artist through coaching and mentorship
c) coach and direct aspiring art students (high school, university level)
d) develop professional relationships with art patrons and arts organizations
e) provide access to art patrons for the artist-in-residence
f) provide art resident with access to a global scale through artists talk series
g) exhibit outcome of artist-in-residence with open call to the public to attend and learn

Population(s) Served
Artists and performers
People of African descent
People of Latin American descent
Multiracial people
Indigenous peoples

Platform for artists to share their career life experiences, highlight obstacles along their path and demonstrate how they were able to confront and overcome those obstacles. Artists also frequently depict their latest work highlighting how the work came about and its meaning to them personally. Last there is a moderated question and answer segment where the audience asks questions either through live zoom audio questions or via chat feature on Zoom or on YouTube live. Artists Talk are either livestreamed through YouTube and Zoom with a recording posted to the Foundation's YouTube channel within one week of airing or held in person with recording made available post the event.

Population(s) Served
People of African descent
People of Latin American descent

The Foundation curates an online artists marketplace showcasing Afrodescendant visual artists. Artist statements, profile of artists and priced works of art on sale to the general public are depicted. No service fees nor commissions are charged for artists to display or sell their works of art through the Artists Marketplace.

Population(s) Served
People of African descent

Provide financial resources to artists to create public artwork through the Foundation's nonprofit partners across the United States and Puerto Rico.

Population(s) Served
People of African descent
People of Caribbean descent
People of African descent
People of Caribbean descent

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

Filantropía Puerto Rico 2022

National Creative Youth Development Funder's Forum 2022

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of visual artists receiving unrestricted financial support

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People of African descent

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

Official response to the global Covid-19 pandemic. Awarded grants to 36 visual artists with average grant award of $1,000.

Total dollar amount of grants awarded

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People of African descent

Related Program

Artist-in-Residence (3 residency programs)

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

2021 Awarded a total of $35,300 to Light Work, Ogden Museum and UChicago APL 2020 Awarded the Museo de Arte de Puerto Rico a grant of $20,000 for Artist Apprenticehship Fellowship Program.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our goal is to increase the visibility of Afrodescedant artists; to provide artists with access to artist-in-residencies, artists talk opportunities, an opportunity to showcase their work on the Foundation's artists marketplace connecting them with crucial art patrons looking to purchase work, or to participate in the Fund for Community Art by providing a commissioned work of art.

- Develop strong alliance of partner organizations (other nonprofits, museums, universities, technology industry professionals) to collaborate on design and execution of programs for visual artists

- Establish a community of artists where introductions are made, experiences shared and a safe culture is established to allow visual artists to mutually exist each other to face obstacles, challenges and to share successes

- Amplify the message of the Foundation through video stories of visual artists; through face-to-face visit with influential art patrons and to expand the access to resources for visual artists

- Network of existing partnerships across the United States and Puerto Rico
- Board of Directors with financial management and investment skills and legal expertise
- Access to high net worth art patrons interested in engaging with visual artists to purchase their work

Launched an art residency program for a Afrodescendant Puerto Rican artist who will not only work on a project for public exhibition but also mentors young students of the arts at the Museo de Arte de Puerto Rico (MAPR) in San Juan, Puerto Rico

Established two Darryl Chappell Foundation Artists-in-Residence at Light Work in Syracuse, New York

Established a photographer-in-residence at the Ogden Museum of Southern Art in New Orleans; Provided photographer-in-residence with an experienced mentor located in Houston, Texas; Public exhibition from December 2022 - January 2023 as a part of PhotoNOLA in New Orleans

Provided emergency response funding to 36 visual artists averaging $1,000 per artist in 2020 and 2021

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Our mission is to empower Afrodescendant artists to achieve their highest potential. The core framework of our work is the Artist Learning Pathway which contains four phases. We serve artists in each of the four phases. Phase I - Parents and young children Foster awareness that a career in art is a viable self-sustaining career path Phase II - Youth (high school students and university students) Provide experiences with both aspiring and established artists to make it real that a career in art is viable and attainable Phase III - Aspiring Artists Fund artists-in-residents programs providing artists with an opportunity to focus on their work while also receiving mentorship from established artists Phase IV - Established Artists Serve as paid mentors to aspiring artists

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), one-on-one with donors,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Our fourth quarter 2021 survey of visual artists brought to our attention a need to provide grant writing expertise and non-fungible token (NFT) knowledge to visual artists in our community of artists - Conducted a free seminar for artists on "how to price your artwork with confidence" that was a virtual 90 minute session facilitated by Halima Taha and Diane Dinkins Carr. Feedback from seminar was over 80% approval rating. Received confirmation from survey of attendees at our latest Artists Talk series (Artists Talk #4, February 20, 2021) that there is public demand for the artists talk on a quarterly basis. We currently provide the talks twice a year. Program committee is considering the feedback along with the board.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Hearing directly from both artists, art patrons, and partner organizations have directed our attention to take action on what we hear. Feedback has assisted in making the following programs possible - - Free seminar for artists series (currently planning next seminar focused on the business side of being an artist in terms of budgeting and financial management) - Organization peer meetings sparked the idea for the Foundation's latest program, the Fund for Community Art. Program announced its first grant to fund a mural in Washington DC's 8th ward

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

Darryl Chappell Foundation
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Darryl Chappell Foundation

Board of directors
as of 11/10/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Darryl Chappell

Darryl Chappell Foundation

Term: 2019 - 2023

Molly Brown

Aaron Chappell

Odis Johnson

Emmanuel Kayode

Darren Sharpe

María Pumarejo

Nadia Sulayman

Darryl Chappell

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 11/9/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American/African
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American/African
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 11/10/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.