Youth Development

STEM Generation Inc.

Inspire. Empower. Educate.

aka STEM Generation   |   Livingston, NJ   |  https://thestemgen.org

Mission

STEM Generation believes that every child deserves a good education. Across the US, we work tirelessly to help children in poor communities achieve more and realize their full potential. We help underfunded schools get materials, promote STEM education among students, and strive to prepare the next generation of thinkers, believers, and doers for success and excellence.

Notes from the nonprofit

We are glad that you are here. If you have questions, please don't hesitate to reach out to us at info@thestemgen.org

Ruling year info

2019

President

Mr. Eric Jing

Main address

2 Billingsley Dr

Livingston, NJ 07039 USA

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EIN

84-2812611

Cause area (NTEE code) info

Youth Development Programs (O50)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (B01)

Fund Raising and/or Fund Distribution (O12)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2019.
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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Across the United States, primary and secondary school institutions are lacking the funding they need to properly prepare their students for success post-high-school. With tight budgets, schools cannot afford even the most basic materials like textbooks or microscopes for their science classrooms. Similarly, underfunded schools lack the funds to host after school extracurricular activities for their students to explore their passions. As STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) increasingly becomes important in our daily lives, it is crucial we prepare the next generation of scientists properly. With these underfunded schools, there exist no ways for aspiring young minds to explore their passions in STEM.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

eduSTEM

Through our eduSTEM program, we donate equipment to science classrooms across the country. Many underfunded schools in the US cannot afford the most basic materials and thus their students are ill-prepared. We fundraise and send equipment like microscopes and resources like textbooks in hopes that they will be put into use to help the students succeed academically with the right materials.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents (13-19 years)
Economically disadvantaged, low-income, and poor people
Budget
$100,000

Our goal with SciWorks is to generate real interest in STEM in students by hosting gamified and interactive workshops where children can participate in hands-on activities that involve critical thinking and teamwork. For example, in our robotics workshop, we divide attendees into teams of four and allot one hour for each team to build a simple robot using code. During this one hour, our volunteers walk around helping each team and answer any questions the kids may have regarding coding or building robots. At the end of the one hour, a "tournament" is held where each team's robot competes in a duel. The winning team will receive a small prize. Through these workshops, we hope to make learning STEM fun and interesting rather than being a tedious and boring subject that no one likes.

Population(s) Served
K-12 (5-19 years)
Economically disadvantaged, low-income, and poor people
Budget
$60,000

Through STEMx, we tailor to the the needs of a school and provide them, in our funding capacity, with exactly what they need. Unlike our eduSTEM program, which collects used and donated equipment, the STEMx program hopes to take that a step further by allowing schools to directly request equipment from us.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents (13-19 years)
Economically disadvantaged, low-income, and poor people
Budget
$10,000

Where we work

Accreditations

Better Business Bureau Accredited Charity 2019

Awards

Platinum Awardee 2019

GuideStar

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of children who received school supplies

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents (13-19 years)

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Metric calculated by student population in aided schools and school districts. Numbers are approximate.

Number of schools financed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

K-12 (5-19 years)

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of children impacted through workshops

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth (0-19 years)

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Metric are exact values.

Amount in dollars worth of equipment or materials donated.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents (13-19 years)

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

All amounts shown are in USD

Number of people reached with our cause

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

General/Unspecified

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Numbers are measuring number of people that register an impression on our mission whether through social media, traditional media, advertising, or otherwise. Numbers are approximate (+/- 500)

Hours of free tutoring provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents (13-19 years)

Related Program

STEMx

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

To find the FMV of the tutoring hours, multiply by the average tutoring hourly tuition of $35 USD/hour

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Charting impact

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

Our organization has two principles in mind for every program we start and every initiative we pursue. The first goal is to provide underfunded schools in the US with the funds they need to prepare their students adequately. The schools that are the most in need of funds are concentrated in central and southern US. With underfunded schools comes low graduation rates and high numbers of students that are ill-prepared to enter the US workforce as full-fledged professionals. Our second goal is to promote and empower children from disadvantaged neighborhoods to explore professions in STEM. Many children from poor communities choose to start working immediately after high school and opt out of going to college. Many do it out of financial burden or lack of interest. Our goal is to not only generate the interest for STEM so that students in poor communities will attend college with a STEM major but also provide the right assistance to alleviate their financial burden while pursuing post-secondary education. Through these two goals, we hope to not only inspire children from poor neighborhoods to explore areas in STEM but also to empower bright young minds to keep exploring STEM after graduating high school.

We have three major strategies to meet your goals and further our cause. Firstly, we hold interactive STEM workshops for children in grades K-12. These workshops combine STEM with hands-on activities to create engaging events that kids will love. These activities involve both critical thinking skills as well as teamwork, allowing kids to explore the intricacies of STEM together. We also hold fundraisers for money and/or classroom equipment (i.e. textbooks or microscopes). The fundraised equipment from donation drives are donated directly with the school districts we are working with. All monetary funds raised from our fundraising campaigns are either put to use in funding our STEM workshops or donated directly to school districts in need. Finally, we seminars for high school teens and their parents. This is a new program that we started in late 2019. We hope to provide advice and insight into STEM fields for aspiring high schoolers that are thinking about their future in college and beyond.

We have identified our capabilities for reaching our goals through the execution of our strategies. Our organization is run primarily with the help of volunteers and people who sympathize with our cause. We have a small board (three members) to oversee and coordinate volunteers to create events but the success of our events is largely dependent on our volunteer count. We have ample funding from various corporations, grants, and individual donors and definitely plenty of support for our cause.

We measure the success of our programs and our progress through three main metrics. The first of which is the number of students impacted by our school donation program. As we continue to donate our fundraised goods from our donation drives and provide equipment to struggling schools, we keep track of the students' impact. Impacted students are calculated from the school's reported student body number rounded down to the hundred's place regardless of the value. The second indicator is the number of total attendees of our STEM for Youth Program (STEMYP). This value tells us how much impact our STEM workshops are making and is calculated by adding the total number of attendees (excluding parents) across all of our workshops. The final indicator is the worth of equipment that we have donated (in USD). As we provide free equipment to schools, the worth of the donations is a good indication of how much we are helping schools with tight budgets. This metric is calculated by finding the fair market value of our donated goods and adding all the values together to find the total worth.

We were informally established as a not-for-profit organization in December 2017. We were incorporated in August and obtained our 501(c)(3) status in October 2019. Since 2017, we have raised over $100,000 and helped 10,000+ students countrywide.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is the organization collecting feedback?

    We regularly collect feedback through: sms text surveys, electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), paper surveys.

  • How is the organization using feedback?

    We use feedback to: to identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, to make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, to inform the development of new programs/projects, to identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, to strengthen relationships with the people we serve.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    We share feedback with: our board.

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to: we don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback.

  • What significant change resulted from feedback

    We changed the activities in one of our STEM workshops after feedback showed that some steps of the workshop could have been extended as students enjoyed them the most.

Financials

STEM Generation Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

STEM Generation Inc.

Board of directors
as of 6/15/2020
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Mrs. Helen Li

Avaya Inc.

Term: 2019 - 2021


Board co-chair

Mr. Eric Jing

STEM Generation Inc.

Term: 2019 - 2020

Xiangfeng Jing

RBC Bank

David Guo

Interactive Brokers LLC

Robert Yuan

Google Inc.

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 01/28/2020

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Asian American/Pacific Islanders/Asian
Gender identity
Male, Not Transgender (Cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 11/12/2019

Policies and practices developed in partnership with Equity in the Center, a project that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems within the social sector to increase racial equity. Learn more

Data
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.

Keywords

education, youth, science, K-12, advocacy, STEM