PLATINUM2024

US Institute of Diplomacy and Human Rights

Advancing education for all

Washington, DC   |  https://usidhr.org

Mission

US Institute of Diplomacy and Human Rights is a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization. Our mission is to advance education for all and enhance global understanding through research, training and programs on diplomacy and human rights. An estimated 258 million children aged 5-16 are out of school. Through our humanitarian program, Chance to Study, we provide underprivileged children from around the world with educational resources to go to school. The Chance to Study program at USIDHR is providing underprivileged children with Edu-Boxes containing school supplies, uniform, shoes and everything needed to go to school for an entire year.

Ruling year info

2020

Founder

Isabelle Vladoiu

Main address

1250 Connecticut Ave NW Ste 700

Washington, DC 20009 USA

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EIN

84-2869112

NTEE code info

International Human Rights (Q70)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Edu for Every Child

An estimated 258 million children aged 5-16 are out of school. Through the EduforEveryChild program, USIDHR is providing underprivileged girls and boys with Edu-Boxes containing school supplies, uniforms, shoes and everything they need to go to school for an entire year. The EduforEveryChild program was created to give a chance to education to children that do not have the necessary means to go to school because they don’t have money to travel to school, to buy a uniform or decent clothes, buy school supplies or worse, they go to school on an empty stomach. This year, the EduforEveryChild Program helped over 200 children of age 6-16 from Pakistan with the resources necessary to go to school. We are now focusing on our next goal to help other vulnerable children. Every year, the program is focused on a different country. Our teams of experts and volunteers travel to different countries or set up collaborations with institutions in different areas where most children need education.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

The Human Rights Training is the most popular training of USIDHR. This self-paced online certification training provides social workers, human rights advocates, nonprofit staff, and others with the tools and knowledge to become human rights consultants and be able to deliver workshops and seminars teaching the Universal Declaration of Human Rights to others. Taught by internationally recognized human rights law specialist, Isabelle Vladoiu who is also the founder of USIDHR, the Human Rights Education training has become one of the top courses in the field with over 3000 graduates so far.

Population(s) Served

The Diplomatic Protocol and Etiquette training is an online training program by US Institute of Diplomacy and Human Rights. Built as a step-by-step module self-paced program, the training equips individuals with all the diplomatic skills to present themselves in a professional manner and stand out from the crowd. From learning how to address Ambassadors and government officials to the rules of etiquette in exchanging a business card, host exquisite events, and dress appropriately, the training prepares you to build professional authority in any career. Additionally, the training certifies you as a diplomatic protocol consultant, equipping you with all the tools and knowledge to consult potential clients on matters of protocol and etiquette, as well as deliver your own workshops, seminars, and classes teaching others these skills.

Population(s) Served

Let Her Lead program was created to empower young women and girls with the knowledge they need to fight against human trafficking, child marriage, and gender-based violence. USIDHR works closely with girls and women to educate them on economic development, making them aware of their human rights, and helping them understand the signs of human trafficking and gender-based violence through education and training.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Adults
Adults

Where we work

Awards

Congratulatory Letter - Mayor of Washington, DC 2020

Mayor Muriel Bowser of Washington DC

Lifetime Achievement Award - President Biden 2022

White House

President's Volunteer Service Award - President Trump 2018

White House

Lifetime Achievement Award 2023

JAGILS

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of students at or above a 90% attendance rate

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Human Rights Education Training

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of teachers who report feeling equipped to address issues of disability and inclusion

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of students educated through field trips

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

At-risk youth, Immigrants and migrants, Victims and oppressed people

Related Program

Edu for Every Child

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of academic scholarships awarded

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls

Related Program

Let Her Lead Program

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of children who have access to education

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents, Children, Economically disadvantaged people, Refugees and displaced people

Related Program

Edu for Every Child

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The core goals of our organization center around making education accessible and affordable for everyone. We are dedicated to breaking down barriers to education, ensuring that individuals, regardless of background or circumstance, have the opportunity to access quality education. Additionally, we strive to advance training and resources in the vital areas of human rights and diplomacy. By doing so, we aim to empower individuals with knowledge and skills that contribute to positive societal change and promote a deeper understanding of human rights and diplomatic principles.

Based on the humanitarian programs deployed by USIDHR, here are some strategies that encapsulate the organization's approach:

Empowerment through Education:

Strategy: Prioritize education as a catalyst for empowerment.
Implementation: Deploy targeted programs like 'Let Her Lead' and 'Edu For Every Child' to empower women and children through education, addressing issues such as human trafficking and child marriage.
Advocacy for Human Rights:

Strategy: Actively engage in advocacy efforts to protect human rights.
Implementation: Execute programs like the 'Religious Freedom Program' to advocate for freedom of religion or belief, confronting anti-Semitism, xenophobia, and expressions of hatred to safeguard fundamental human rights.
Research and Knowledge Dissemination:

Strategy: Utilize research to foster understanding and progression.
Implementation: Conduct and promote high-quality research through the Research Program, generating white papers and articles. Disseminate these insights to contribute to a deeper understanding of diplomacy and human rights.
Community-Centric Approach:

Strategy: Adopt a community-focused strategy for holistic impact.
Implementation: Tailor programs to address specific needs within communities, ensuring that initiatives like 'Edu For Every Child' consider the unique challenges faced by children from low-income families.
Collaboration and Expert Engagement:

Strategy: Foster collaboration and engage leading experts.
Implementation: Collaborate with experts in diplomacy and human rights for program development and research, leveraging a network of professionals to enhance the impact and effectiveness of initiatives.
Holistic Approach to Gender Equality:

Strategy: Promote gender equality through comprehensive initiatives.
Implementation: Address gender-based violence and empower women and girls through the 'Let Her Lead' program, contributing to a more equitable and just society.
These strategies reflect USIDHR's comprehensive and proactive approach to addressing humanitarian issues, promoting education, advocating for human rights, and leveraging research and collaboration for positive societal impact.

USIDHR possesses unique capabilities that position it effectively to meet its goals:

Strategic Location:

Location: Headquarters situated in the core heart of Washington DC, within a 10-minute walk from the White House and surrounded by embassies.
Significance: Proximity to key political and diplomatic entities facilitates effective collaboration and engagement with government bodies, enhancing the organization's influence and reach.
Global Collaboration:

Collaboration: Actively collaborates with multiple governments.
Footprint: Presence and certified consultants in over 93 countries.
Importance: Global reach enables the organization to address diverse societal issues, leverage international expertise, and implement programs tailored to local contexts.
Expertise in Diplomacy and Human Rights:

Certified Consultants: Over 12,500 individuals trained as Human Rights Consultants.
Expert Network: Collaboration with leading experts in diplomacy and human rights.
Impact: A pool of certified consultants and expert networks enhances the organization's capacity to implement effective programs and research initiatives.
Proactive Engagement:

Proximity to Decision-Makers: Geographic proximity to key decision-makers in Washington DC.
Effective Advocacy: Facilitates direct engagement with policymakers, allowing the organization to advocate for policy changes in the fields of human rights and diplomacy.
Holistic Approach:

Program Diversity: Deployment of diverse programs such as 'Let Her Lead,' 'Edu For Every Child,' and the 'Religious Freedom Program.'
Comprehensive Impact: Ensures a holistic approach to addressing societal challenges, from empowering women and children to advocating for religious freedom.
Strategic Alliances:

Embassy Presence: Surrounding embassies provide opportunities for diplomatic engagement and strategic alliances.
Global Network: Collaborative efforts with embassies contribute to the organization's ability to address international issues collectively.
These capabilities collectively underscore USIDHR's strength in navigating the complex landscape of diplomacy and human rights, from local community initiatives to global collaborations with governments and expert networks.


Accomplishments:

Global Expansion: Established teams, regional directors, and consultants in 76 countries, surpassing the initial vision for global outreach.

Educational Empowerment: Offered certification courses on crucial topics such as human rights, human trafficking prevention, disability rights, and diplomacy, serving as beacons of empowerment.

Impactful Programs:

'Edu for Every Child': Supported underprivileged children with essential educational materials.
'Let Her Lead': Empowered women and girls, providing scholarships to protect them from trafficking and gender-based violence.
'Religious Freedom Program': Actively promoted freedom of religion or belief, combating anti-Semitism, xenophobia, and hatred.
High-Profile International Events:

Successfully organized events like the International Summit on Disability Rights and the Diplomacy and Human Rights Summit, showcasing dedication to addressing diverse social issues.
Human Rights Consultants: Trained over 12,500 individuals as Human Rights Consultants, transforming them into ambassadors of change within their communities.

Persistent Mission: Continued commitment to the mission of ensuring education for all, including the launch of new courses, groundbreaking research, and fostering global collaborations.

Next Steps:

Expand Educational Offerings: Continue launching new courses to broaden educational offerings and reach a wider audience.

Research and Publications: Persist in publishing groundbreaking research to contribute valuable insights and foster a deeper understanding of human rights and diplomacy.

Global Collaborations: Strengthen and initiate new global collaborations to further illuminate the path toward human rights and diplomatic solutions.

Community Engagement: Maintain focus on community-level impact, ensuring that education remains a catalyst for transformation within diverse communities.

Advocacy and Awareness: Continue advocating for human rights and raising awareness on critical issues through high-profile international events.

Sustainable Impact: Work towards sustainable impact by addressing evolving challenges and actively contributing to positive societal transformation.

The organization's achievements reflect a strong commitment to its founding vision, and the outlined next steps demonstrate a persistent dedication to advancing education, human rights, and diplomacy on a global scale.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Financials

US Institute of Diplomacy and Human Rights
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

US Institute of Diplomacy and Human Rights

Board of directors
as of 01/23/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Isabelle Vladoiu

Manuel Oancia

Olivia Flavell

Vicky Leyva

Isabelle Vladoiu

Rosa Ayala

Andrise Bass

Alvaro Leiva Sanchez

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 1/21/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 07/05/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.