Alaska Eating Disorders Alliance

aka AKEDA   |   Anchorage, AK   |  https://www.akeatingdisordersalliance.org/

Mission

The Alaska Eating Disorders Alliance provides help and inspires hope by engaging our diverse communities in education, advocacy and support for Alaskans affected by eating disorders.

Ruling year info

2019

Co-Founder, Director

Beth Rose

Co-Founder, Board Chair

Jenny Loudon

Main address

440 Oceanview Dr

Anchorage, AK 99515 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

84-3178623

NTEE code info

Eating Disorder, Addiction (F53)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990-N.

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Eating disorders are disabling, potentially fatal, and costly mental disorders that substantially impair physical health and disrupt psychosocial functioning. Help for those who are struggling with this illness in Alaska are extremely minimal, with a limited network of health care providers to identify and treat eating disorders or provide support and information to families and friends. As a result, individuals and members of their support network often struggle with isolation, despair, and serious health risks. The increased volume and severity of patients seeking help for eating disorders since the pandemic is placing additional pressure on Alaska’s already constrained system. The Alaska Eating Disorders Alliance (AKEDA) is seeking to increase the number of medical and mental health professionals equipped to address eating disorders in Alaska; provide resources for families and promote improved access to care.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Community and professional education on eating disorders

AKEDA provides community education presentations to build awareness of eating disorders and promote body positivity. We work with schools, community organizations, mental health providers, physicians, and other community partners to provide awareness activities as well as professional development.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Adolescents

AKEDA currently holds a monthly facilitated Friends & Family support group for Alaskans supporting a loved one with an eating disorder.

Population(s) Served
Caregivers
Families

Professionally led support group for adults 18+ who are experiencing eating disorder symptoms and behaviors and are recovery-focused.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

Member of Foraker Group 2021

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Hours of support group services offered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Caregivers, Families, Adults

Related Program

Support groups

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Hours based on 1-hour monthly support groups for Friends & Family members, and 1 hour support groups for adults with eating disorders

Number of participants attending course/session/workshop

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Health, Adults, Teachers, Students

Related Program

Community and professional education on eating disorders

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Includes presentations to behavioral health organizations, medical clinics, village health aides, community groups, families, Body Project trainings, university classes, and other professionals

Number of rallies/events/conferences/lectures held to further mission

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with diseases and illnesses, Work status and occupations, Adults

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The Alaska Eating Disorders Alliance is the only organization in Alaska to address eating disorders. Its mission is to provide help and inspire hope by engaging our diverse communities in education, advocacy and support for Alaskans affected by eating disorders.

Goals include:
1. Provide educational programming: AKEDA offers community awareness presentations throughout the state to build awareness of eating disorders and Alaska resources. A major focus of the organization is to offer educational programs for medical providers, mental health professionals, dietitians, health aides and families. The goals of these programs are to grow the capacity of Alaska clinicians to address eating disorders, improve treatment team collaboration and enhance the knowledge of families to support loved ones.

2. Engage in advocacy: AKEDA works on advocacy initiatives in our state and nationally to promote funding for mental health, equity in access to eating disorder treatment and access to medical nutritional treatment.

3. Support – AKEDA offers a monthly Family and Friends support group, educational courses to help educate and empower parents, and a professionally-led support group for adults experiencing eating disorders.

4. Prevention/Body Confidence — AKEDA offers programs to teens and young adults to promote body confidence and open a dialogue surrounding eating and body image issues, social media pressures to be thin, diet culture and other triggers for an eating disorder.

For Good Health and Wellbeing:
1. Mental health treatment is a key component of essential health services. To provide treatment for eating disorders in a rural state like Alaska there must be sufficient health professionals who are eating disorder-informed. AKEDA prioritizes growing professional capacity so that more therapists, medical providers, dietitians and others can diagnose and address eating disorders in Alaska. Strategies include professional conferences, tailored presentations, and opportunities for multiple disciplines to learn together and discuss case studies through programs such as Eating Disorder Project ECHOs.

2. Increase access to knowledge and care: Compared to other states, Alaska can be viewed in its entirety as a rural location with limited access to treatment options. In addition, AKEDA recognizes that individuals who live in small communities, are low- income, or have no health care, experience burdens that make accessing eating disorder care even more problematic. AKEDA will offer educational and family support programs statewide through interactive, online platforms and will continue to work with the tribal health system to ensure knowledge and access for Alaska's indigenous population.

Reduced Inequities:
1. Ensure diversity, equity and inclusion: Despite the myth that eating disorders affect only urban, white, affluent teens, in fact this illness affects 9% of Americans across all demographic groups. However, people of color with eating disorders are half as likely to be diagnosed or to receive treatment. AKEDA will develop programs that ensure inclusion of previously marginalized groups both in terms of presenters and involvement of communities.

AKEDA is a statewide organization that actively creates partnerships to ensure that its services reach throughout Alaska. AKEDA’s community presentations and trainings are offered with a statewide perspective. In the past nine months, we have completed a training for Community Health Aides in villages throughout Alaska, provided a presentation to the Seldovia Village Native Association, offered trainings to therapists from Unalaska, Ninilchik, Sitka, Anchorage and the Mat-Su Valley. In addition, family members and individuals experiencing eating disorders across Alaska attend our support groups.

The co-founders of AKEDA, Beth Rose and Jenny Loudon, bring decades of experience in nonprofit management, fundraising, community engagement, and health policy and planning. They have extensive contacts throughout the state.

The Alaska Eating Disorders Alliance board adds eating disorders knowledge and expertise to guide this organization effectively. Board members include a family practice doctor, psychiatrist, two therapists, a dietitian, nonprofit mental health executive, wellness coach, foundation program officer and the co-founders.

AKEDA is a statewide organization that has worked to create partnerships to ensure that its services reach throughout Alaska. Among the organizations that partner with AKEDA are the Alaska Native Medical Center, Mat-Su Health Services, Alaska Behavioral Health, Alaska Chapter of the Academy of Pediatricians, NAMI Anchorage, University of Alaska campuses, Southcentral Foundation and other tribal health entities. Funding for AKEDA’s activities come from hundreds of individual donors and funders such as the Rasmuson Foundation, Alaska Community Foundation, Alaska Mental Health Trust Authority, GCI, and community groups.

In 2021, AKEDA has reached more than 1100 Alaskans. In March 2022, the organization received American Rescue Plan Act funds to create additional programs in Alaska to mitigate the spike in eating disorders caused by the pandemic.


From September 2020 to December 2021, AKEDA reached more than 1300 Alaskans. Our outreach included:
* 302 Therapists trained in eating disorder diagnoses and treatment
* 227 Physicians and primary care providers trained in eating disorders management
* 147 Family members provided with family education and skills training
* 100+ Alaskans assisted through family and individual support groups
* 41 Facilitators trained in body confidence courses
* 37 presentations to mental health organizations, physical conferences, universities and community groups
* 8 High schools reached for student athletes education on eating disorder prevention
* 7 media interviews, including one that was picked up nationally

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    AKEDA serves as a local resource for individual and families in Alaska who are struggling with an eating disorder or supporting a loved one with an eating disorder. Eating disorders are wildly misunderstood, complex psychological, biological and social illnesses that pose serious health and physical risks to individuals. Help for those who are struggling with this brain-based disorder in Alaska are extremely minimal, with a limited network of health care providers to identify and treat eating disorders or provide support and information to families and friends. As a result, individuals and members of their support network often struggle with isolation, despair, and serious health risks.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Community meetings/Town halls,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    AKEDA recently hosted a professional development conference for the therapeutic community to increase capacity in the state to treat those with eating disorders. After the conference, we posed a survey to participants. Survey results are being used to help improve registration and communication of our next scheduled professional development training.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

Alaska Eating Disorders Alliance
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Alaska Eating Disorders Alliance

Board of directors
as of 3/28/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Jenny Loudon

Alaska Eating Disorders Alliance

Term: 2022 - 2021

Jenny Loudon

Consultant

Katie Bell

Psychotherapist, Art Therapy AK

Grace Schumacher

Registered Dietitian, Nutrition Partnership

Evelyn Abello

Consultant

Beth Rose

Consultant

Meg Carlson-Cosentino

Family Practice Physician, Southcentral Foundation

Jason Lessard

Executive Director, NAMI Anchorage

Enzina Marrari

Artist, Program Officer, Rasmuson Foundation

Daniel Rohlf

Psychiatrist, Tanana Valley Clinic

Keegan Carrol

Wellness Coach, JAHMI Health and Wellness

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Not applicable
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? No
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 03/23/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Multi-Racial/Multi-Ethnic (2+ races/ethnicities)
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 04/16/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.