Maasai Water Project

BASIC. HUMAN. RIGHTS.

Miami Beach, FL   |  https://maasaiwaterproject.org/

Mission

Maasai Water Project's mission is to protect the basic human rights to Health, Education, Culture & Community for East African communities. We improve access to sustainable safe water, healthcare, primary education, and economic opportunity while carefully protecting and preserving the culture of the communities in Tanzania, Rwanda, and Kenya that we serve.

Ruling year info

2019

Principal Officer

Stephanie Zabriskie

Main address

2155 Washington Ct #404

Miami Beach, FL 33139 USA

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EIN

84-3253189

NTEE code info

International Development, Relief Services (Q30)

International Educational Development (Q34)

International Health Development (Q39)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2019.
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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Our vision is to promote positive transformation In East African Communities including all Maasai People, especially women and children, by ensuring they have access to vital education, health services, a safe water supply and tools for economic self-sufficiency while protecting and preserving their culture and traditional way of life.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene (WASH)

The human right to water is indispensable for leading a life in human dignity. It is a prerequisite for the realization of other human rights. Water scarcity in East Africa inflicts great damage on our communities' basic rights to health, education, culture & community. Since natural water sources are scarce in this region, women must travel long distances to scavenge the land for surface water that collects during the rainy season; during the dry season, water is dangerously scarce. Maasai Water Project addresses these needs by providing clean, safe sustainable water, hygiene, and sanitation (WASH) solutions to women, families, and indigenous communities in Tanzania.

Population(s) Served
Indigenous peoples
Families
Women and girls

For the Maasai to complete basic education without breaking from their unique and ancient culture, they need a way to access education within their own settlement geography. To address this need, we employ a system of small schools throughout Maasai sub-villages within the Misigiyo Ward where Maasai children receive basic education. At these same schools, we also provide adult education classes to women.

Population(s) Served
Indigenous peoples
Families
Women and girls
Children and youth

The Maasai live in a largely cashless society, relying on the earth and their livestock to provide what they need to survive. Today, Maasai are often forced to sell livestock to meet basic needs. Maasai Water Project works with Maasai female entrepreneurs to sell locally-made jewelry and donates the proceeds directly to these women to promote their economic self-sufficiency, enabling them to earn money to purchase water for cooking, sanitation, and hygiene.

Population(s) Served
Indigenous peoples
Nomadic people
Women and girls

For centuries, the Maasai have lived a semi-nomadic, pastoralist lifestyle; today, this presents barriers to accessing healthcare. To increase access to lifesaving care, we will provide doctors at the nearest local clinic, the Misigiyo Clinic, with four-wheel drive transportation to deliver on-site medical care for acute and emergency health situations.

Our second goal is to improve availability of prescription drugs for the Maasai to address the problem that only 2% of prescription drugs in Africa are produced on the continent, and many Africans cannot afford imported drugs. The nearest dispensary is more than a day away by foot. Maasai Water Project requests purchases medications to be stored at the Misigiyo Clinic so that Maasai who need ongoing therapies have access.

Population(s) Served
Indigenous peoples
Caregivers

Maasai Water Project increases Maasai women's access to health professionals, healthcare, and supplies.

While the nearest clinic, the Misigiyo Clinic, offers primary care, the resident doctor is a man. Culturally, Maasai women do not communicate with men about women’s issues. Maasai Water Project is raising funds to hire female doctors to work at the Clinic and make monthly visits to regularly engage in building relationships with women and raising awareness about healthcare access.

We also plan to increase the capacity of the Misigiyo Clinic to provide maternal care. While at-home births are standard practice, women with life-threatening complications need intervention. To increase the Clinic’s capacity to serve these women, Maasai Water Project is funding renovations to and equipment for the Misigiyo Clinic's maternity ward.

Finally, menstruation supplies are crucial to supporting the health of Maasai women. Costs of disposable products and lack of waste management services are barriers to period management. To address this, Maasai Water Project delivers sanitary underwear to the Maasai women, along with soap and hygiene education.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls

Maasai Water Project provides sun protection for Albino children and orphans in Rwanda by distributing sunscreen and sun-protection apparel, which is necessary and life saving for this Albino community of East Africa.

Maasai Water Project also partners with Children Of Destiny to provide housing for Rwandan orphans and street children in Kigali. This Children Of Destiny residence provides a no-cost, safe, secure, permanent home for children in need. More than just shelter, the home provides healthcare, education, mentorship and vocational training for the children and rehabilitation for

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Orphans
People with disabilities

Where we work

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Maasai Water Project works to protect the basic human rights to Health, Education, Culture & Community. We improve access to sustainable safe water, healthcare, economic opportunity and education while carefully protecting and preserving the culture of indigenous communities in Tanzania, Rwanda, and Kenya.

Our strategy is to be led by the local community and work closely with them to implement programs and solutions. The Maasai have a unique and challenging settlement geography and a semi-nomadic pastoral traditional way of life. These factors make implementing modern human rights improvements challenging. Through out women's and men's Maasai leadership councils, Maasai Water Project has direct communication with the community we serve. We work together to identify issues and strategize solutions. Most project implementation is executed by members within the Maasai community or as a hands-on joint effort with our organization's leadership. We insure effective and sustainable results by working side-by-side with the community members we serve. in this way, we work to reinstste and protect basic human rights while carefully preserving the existing community and culture.

- Focus on Community and cultural preservation
- Local leadership from a council of men and a council of woman
- Local implementation through strong community relationships and collaborative communication
- Strong corporate partnerships

Preschool and Kindergarten : Basic education is inaccessible to Maasai children in this remote region of Ngorongoro, TanzaniaOur Small Boma Schools are built by the Maasai people in the communities they serve, utilizing the same construction practices used to build Boma homesteads. Local materials and simple construction methods minimize the cost for the school building so we can direct more funding to learning supplies and teacher salaries. With our Small Boma Schools, early Swahili and English literacy is accessible to Maasai children. In addition to covering the cost of building the schools, we hire local Maasai women teachers and pay them a competitive salary, as well as cover the expenses of uniforms, textbooks, classroom materials, and other educational supplies. As a result, Preschool and Kindergarten children starting at age 3 will be prepared to enter the Misigiyo Primary School by the age of 7.

Adult Language: The Maasai need Swahili and English literacy to preserve their basic human rights and natural environment.  Illiteracy in the national languages excludes the Maasai from full participation in social and economic activities that determine their ability to preserve their natural environment. However, these languages are only learned in schools, which are largely inaccessible. Our Adult Language Education program addresses these needs by providing local language classes that are easily accesable for women who are able to teach in our Small Boma Schools. To ensure that our Small Boma Schools education program is sustainable, it is necessary to increase the number of women qualified to teach in our Small Boma Schools. Our Language Education program serves both men and women, however more than 75% of students enrolled in these classes are Maasai women.

Food Security for Widows :Traditionally, only Maasai men can own livestock. This social system creates an increased vulnerability for widowed mothers. Our “Sister’s Boma” project has gathered 11 widows and their 53 children to come together in one village. The women selected for our Sister’s Boma Project were identified by our local Maasai advisory councils, which includes a council of Maasai elders and a council of Maasai women. The widowed women we serve, as well as their children, are facing starvation and relying on handouts of maize to survive. Now the women of our Sister’s Boma own their own livestock the first time in their lives. In addition to meat, goats provide a sustainable food source of milk and yogurt which can also be traded or sold.

Women' Health: Maasai girls can miss 25% of school days due to their monthly menstrual period. Our Maasai girls and woman do not have access to any kind of menstruation management products. Disposable period management products are not a feasible solution in this part of the world. We supply donated sanitary underwear for our Maasai schoolgirls and women. When distributing, we also provide hygiene education and soap.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Community meetings/Town halls, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

Maasai Water Project
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Maasai Water Project

Board of directors
as of 7/9/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Reginald Dunlap

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 07/09/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 01/05/2021

Policies and practices developed in partnership with Equity in the Center, a project that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems within the social sector to increase racial equity. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.