Bastrop County Animal Shelter Helpers

Bringing the community together to improve the lives of animals in Bastrop County, Texas

aka BCAS Helpers   |   Bastrop, TX   |  https://www.bcashelpers.org

Mission

Working with other animal welfare organizations, to make Bastrop County a community where: • The Bastrop County Animal Shelter is able to place all healthy and behaviorally-sound animals that are surrendered to them into good homes, or transfer them to other humane organizations; • The Bastrop County Animal Shelter always has room for the intake of animals needing assistance; • Animals within the Bastrop County Animal Shelter live with minimal stress during their stay; • Every dog and cat outside of the Bastrop County Animal Shelter is cared for responsibly.

Ruling year info

2019

President

Ms Jenni A Ritchie

Main address

P.O. Box 1415

Bastrop, TX 78602 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

84-3309068

NTEE code info

Animal Protection and Welfare (includes Humane Societies and SPCAs) (D20)

Fund Raising and/or Fund Distribution (D12)

Animal Training, Behavior (D61)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Bastrop County has a growing population in a rural area, and this growing population includes many cats and dogs that residents cannot afford to care for responsibly. Due to the rural area, people tend to have more pets than in an urban environment, and they tend to run loose.. There is a tremendous pet overpopulation problem, and a significant low-income population that cannot afford even discounted surgery for all their pets. The shelter does not have funding to help significantly injured animals. Without external funding and partnerships to provide emergency medical care, they would end up euthanizing these animals. Examples include car injury trauma, bullet wounds, severe mange, and severe infections. The shelter's limited budget keeps them from being able to afford replacements for basic items that break - grooming equipment, autoclaves, radios, microchip readers. Lastly, supply of adoptable animals exceeds demand within the county.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Spay/Neuter Subsidies

Provide certificates to low-income residents that will pay for discounted spay/neuter and vaccination services for their pets. This serves our goal of reducing shelter intake and improving public welfare by increasing the percentage of altered and vaccinated dogs and cats in the County by
a. Making basic vet care more affordable for people who need it
b. Increasing availability of affordable vet services

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

Providing financial support for veterinary care to animals housed at the county shelter. This is for procedures or exams the county does not have resources to fund.

Population(s) Served

This program involves contributions of resources to the county animal shelter to supplement what they are able to obtain from the county. It includes equipment for the medical clinic, supplies for foster parents, capital improvements, food, medicine, microchip readers, and more.

Population(s) Served

A limited number of animals who would not do well in the shelter or who need to be out of the shelter for some reason are accepted into our rescue program, which is foster-based. This diverts animals from the shelter and gives the shelter more room for others.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of animals with freedom from pain

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Emergency Medical Care for Shelter Animals

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We provide emergency medical care for shelter animals that the shelter cannot fund. The shelter recommends animals to be helped to us based on their evaluation of the animal.

Number of animal clinics/shelters improved as a direct result of the nonprofit's efforts

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Shelter Resource Improvement

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

We work in partnership with the Bastrop County Animal Shelter and provide thousands of dollars' worth of improvements and supplies each year.

Number of animals receiving subsidized or free spay/neuter services

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Spay/Neuter Subsidies

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This program started in mid-2020.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

We have three overarching goals: (1) to reduce the number of unwanted cats and dogs in the county, thus reducing the animals requiring shelter and assistance; (2) to provide resources to assist animal care at the shelter, which the county cannot or will not provide; and (3) to increase adoptions of homeless animals from Bastrop County. We use a multi-pronged approach with the vision of seeing every dog and cat in Bastrop County cared for responsibly.

In accomplishing this, we aim to communicate often and transparently about what we are doing. We are volunteer-run and very responsive to the needs of the animals. Integrity is very important to us and we have policies around financial controls, ethics, conflict of interest, and confidentiality. We think this distinguishes our charity and we want our donors to be confident their funds are used efficiently, effectively, and for the designated purpose.

We have implemented the following strategies thus far:

Prevention of unwanted animals: developed partnerships with two discounted spay/neuter organizations operating in Bastrop County and set up a spay/neuter subsidy program for residents in financial need. This is set up online.

Emergency Medical Care & Shelter Resources: partnered with the Bastrop County Animal Shelter (BCAS) to create a process for requesting emergency care for shelter animals. Regular meetings are held to prioritize other shelter needs, including medical supplies.

Volunteer assistance: Setup a program to subsidize the needs of shelter foster animals so more of them can be fostered. Began a shelter volunteer recognition effort.

Adoption promotion: in addition to promoting animals on our social media outlets, we have strategies to improve adoptability (grooming, training, behavior evaluation) and fund transportation to out-of-state rescues with more capacity for adoptions.

We have a team of dedicated volunteers, most of whom have also spent many years as shelter volunteers. Just on the board, there are many decades of practical animal welfare experience. Three of our officers have significant business backgrounds and know that effectively running a charity is similar running a small business. It requires discipline, planning, financial acumen, personnel management, and appropriate software.

In our initial year of existence we raised over $50,000 for our programs, 40% through grants and 60% through individual donations. By automating applications processes and making our procedures more efficient, we are able to get a lot done without a lot of people.

A big part of our capability comes through partnerships with the shelter, with spay/neuter providers, with local veterinarians, and with other local animal-related businesses. Our mission statement emphasizes that we are "bringing the community together" and that is how we multiply our resources.

For the low-income spay/neuter program, in the first 7 months we approved 200 applications and 133 surgeries were completed (remainder to be scheduled in 2021). We also ran a "multiple-pet" surgery special for the last 2 months of 2020, non-income-qualified, and achieved 18 surgeries.

18 animals received emergency medical care from us in 2020; the vast majority survived to be adopted (a few had to be euthanized due to the extent of their injuries upon examination).

In the first 7 months of the program, 18 foster parents received food assistance for their foster animals (typically litters of puppies and kittens).

Grooming services were provided to a number of dogs through a local partnership with a groomer who will come to the shelter monthly, and through other groomers in town.

Three dogs were transported out of state for adoption at other rescues. One health certificate was provided for a dog whose transport cost was paid otherwise.

The shelter was provided with numerous resources: Medication, grooming equipment, an autoclave, a microchip reader, a medical table printer, 3 pallets of cat litter, 4 new industrial propane heaters for a dog kennel, and a deck for the medical clinic so patrons could socially-distance.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Low income pet owners who take advantage of our reduced-cost or free services for their pets.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Community meetings/Town halls, Suggestion box/email, Facebook solicitation of opinions and ideas,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We reached out to people who had applied to get spay/neuter certificates to find out why they had not followed through. We learned several things - our communication wasn't understood in some cases, and the mail had gone to spam in other cases. We also learned that people had trouble making appointments with some providers, or couldn't use the providers due to the size or health of their pets. This led us to assign a board member to following up promptly with each applicant who didn't complete the process within 3 weeks. When we learned of difficulty making appointments or using the usual providers, we had one-on-one conversations to resolve the problems and get to the end result: spayed or neutered pets! We also meet with shelter personnel to get feedback about what is working.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our board, Partner organizations such as shelter and spay/neuter providers,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Education is always empowering for people. We work with them to give them options when they feel they cannot help their pets given their situation.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    Language barriers,

Financials

Bastrop County Animal Shelter Helpers

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Bastrop County Animal Shelter Helpers

Board of directors
as of 5/17/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Ms Jenni Ritchie

Erika McDonald

Cordelia Holmes

Terry Gummelt

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Not applicable
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 5/17/2021,

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 05/17/2021

Policies and practices developed in partnership with Equity in the Center, a project that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems within the social sector to increase racial equity. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.