Transformations By Olympic Angels

We wrap community around children, youth, and families in the foster care community.

aka Olympic Angels   |   Port Townsend, WA   |  http://www.olympicangels.org
This organization has provided GuideStar with documentation indicating that it is recognized as tax-exempt by the IRS. If you have any questions or concerns, please check with a tax professional to confirm the tax deductibility of any contributions.

Mission

Olympic Angels mission is to walk alongside children, youth, and families in the foster care community by offering consistent support through intentional giving, relationship building, and mentorship.

Notes from the nonprofit

Olympic Angels (EIN #84-4233503) is covered as an IRC 501(c)(3) organization as a subordinate under the group exemption of Transformations by Austin Angels (EIN #27-2087142), 501c3 Nonprofit Corporation Subordinate Group Exemption 2096. Donations are tax-deductible; 100% of your donation stays local and goes towards our work on the Olympic Peninsula.

Founding Year info

N/A

Interim Executive Director

Mark Moder

Board Chair

Ian Hanna

Main address

PO Box 654

Port Townsend, WA 98368 USA

Show more addresses

EIN

84-4233503

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Kids placed in foster care face very high risks for much worse outcomes later in life than their peers. This isn’t only because the situation that caused them to be placed in the care of the state was traumatic, but also because the experience of being in foster care layers on additional traumas. An overwhelming body of evidence shows that the kind of ongoing, chronic trauma experienced by these kids not only severely impacts their emotional state and behavioral needs during childhood, but also leads to drastically poorer outcomes as they reach adulthood. One of the main contributors to the trauma children experience in foster care is the lack of community support and stable relationships with caring, responsible, dependable adults. Placement in the foster system can sometimes equate to stability, but more often kids are repeatedly moved, often far from the Peninsula and all they know, uprooting and re-traumatizing them again and again.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Love Box

The Love Box program provides fostering families (caregivers, children in foster care, and biological/adopted children) with community and holistic support. This wrap-around support enables caregivers to continue to do the important and meaningful work of being foster parents. When foster families are matched with committed volunteers who show up monthly, parents feel supported and children gain a greater sense of normalcy, relational permanency, and self-confidence.

Volunteers seek to build relationships with their family by spending quality time with the whole family: playing games, sharing a meal, and being intentional. They can also create and deliver personal care packages based on current practical needs. We tell our volunteers to think of themselves as the fun “auntie” and “uncle” who visits once a month to bring love, encouragement, and hope. This program requires a one-year commitment, but the connections and impact last a lifetime.

Population(s) Served
Foster and adoptive children
Foster and adoptive parents

The Dare to Dream program is an opportunity to individually serve an aged-out or at-risk to age out youth in foster care (ages ranging from 11-22). Our mentors are advocates, teachers, guides, role models, valued friends, and available resources.

The heart of the Dare to Dream program is to walk alongside youth as they navigate through life's challenges. The youth in our Dare to Dream program need the wisdom, advice, encouragement, and community that mentors can provide. Mentors meet practical and emotional needs as well as provide guidance through developmental milestones (such as obtaining a driver's license, opening a bank account, understanding financial literacy, higher education prep, etc.). The goal is for youth to be engaged and to feel supported and equipped to navigate life. A mentor commits to meeting with the youth every other week to set goals and help them achieve their dreams. These relationships will hopefully last a lifetime, but the program is a year commitment. Mentors matched with a high school student are strongly encouraged to stay with the youth until high school graduation.

We tell mentors that the simple act of telling their youth “I believe in you,” “You are special,” and “You are going to do great things” can change their path completely.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
Foster and adoptive children

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of volunteers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Foster and adoptive children, Foster and adoptive parents

Related Program

Love Box

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Total number of volunteer hours contributed to the organization

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Hours donated directly to families by community volunteers in 2020= 4,562 hours. Hours donated by the board in 2020 = 2,652 hours.

Number of children served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of families served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

fundraising cost per dollar raised

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

We believe that for foster care to work, we have to design the system of care around the needs of the child. Children in the court dependency system are wards of the state - literally society’s children - and should be treasured for who they are and the potential they hold. Here on the Olympic Peninsula, we’ve decided we can do much, much better, simply by placing community volunteers in support of families and making sure each child has at least one healthy, consistent adult relationship in addition to their foster parents. We have repeatedly found that while not everyone is called to foster, most anyone can make a difference in the life of a child in care.

Our vision is that every young person in foster care has healthy, affirming, and lasting adult relationships within their community. We know from the literature and simple human experience that this is the single most critical building block to healthy development.

To provide families with exceptional support, we first have to provide our volunteers with the training, guidance, and peer network they need to be successful, as they are the people providing frontline care. Somewhat counterintuitively, our goal over the next three years is not directly focused on the number of children served or changes in their trajectory, but on the number of volunteers we successfully put into front line service, as they are the foundation of successful outcomes:

By the end of 2023, Olympic Angels will empower 400 program volunteers to serve children in foster care and the families that support them.

Imperatives in 2021:
These strategies imply certain “must reach” milestones in the coming year, accomplishments that are critical to continued growth and impact. These include:
A fully functional system for data collection and analysis to substantiate impact and provide direction for continuous improvement of the volunteer experience.
A comprehensive three-year funding plan and accompanying donor pipeline.
A diversified governing board, more reflective of Clallam County and of the populations we serve that are disproportionately represented in the foster system (Native, POC, and current or former LGBTQ+ youth).
A Clallam County launch plan and priorities for outreach, followed by active partnership development and preparations for launching community-level programming. Partnership development with Peninsula tribes will be a top priority.

Our three strategies are intended to be both distinct, but also highly intertwined:

Strategy 1: Provide the framework that allows the broader Peninsula community to organize around improving the foster system.

Well-trained volunteers providing whole family care fundamentally change the underlying dynamics of foster care by bringing stability, attention, human kindness, and love to families that can often be overwhelmed and isolated. With a community-supported framework in place, suddenly a host of available resources can be activated, because there is a broader base of people with the time available to do things like fill out applications, track down the right people, or provide respite care to overburdened foster parents.

No one would disagree that the foster system needs improvements at every level. In time, as more and more people understand how the system of care can be rewired with childrens’ best interests in mind, we believe our volunteers and partners are capable of becoming a collective force for positive change.

Strategy 2: Focus on the volunteer as the core client, with highly personalized support at every stage.

The Angels model is effective and efficient for one simple reason - ordinary people from all walks of life show up to do the work as volunteers. Our responsibility as an organization is to make sure their experience is as real, fulfilling, and purposeful as we possibly can. Foster care is anything but easy, so we ensure volunteers are well trained and informed, have a strong peer network of support, and are matched with families where they stand the best chance of doing the most good.

At the heart of good service to volunteers is an individualized understanding of their needs and motivations. National Angels provides a proven framework for our case managers to understand, document, and take action relative to these needs and motivations through a consultative process. Foster families and children in care receive a parallel intake process, and it is through this depth of information that successful matches are made. This case management capacity is ultimately the core competency of Angels, directly tied to our ability to scale: the organization empowers case managers to empower volunteers to empower foster families to empower children.

Strategy 3: Consistently message a new foster narrative: shifting from stigma and isolation to joy and collective purpose.

One of the greatest gifts that National Angels has provided us here on the Peninsula is an ethos of hope. Foster care often occurs out of public view, but by bringing it into the open and offering concrete ways of helping, we believe that almost anyone can rise up to do something to improve life for these children, particularly if such opportunities are easy to access, matched to volunteers’ availability and lifestyle, and consistently rewarding.

By the end of 2023, Olympic Angels will empower 400 program volunteers to serve children in foster care and the families that support them.

To date, we have recruited 120 volunteers and have mapped the annual goals and related capacities and costs needed to reach 400. While the number of volunteers is an indicator of our capacity, it is the quality of their experience that dictates the depth and duration of their involvement. For this reason, we focus on survey-driven feedback and continuous quality improvement at every stage - recruitment, vetting, training, matching, supporting, retaining, celebrating, and even offboarding.

Thus far Olympic Angels volunteers have served over 55 children, even staying connected when children are moved out of our area. In 2020, total case management expenses were $21,684 to initiate and support foster families and mentees. This returned $193,216 in volunteer time, in-kind donations, and miles driven on behalf of the families and mentees, a nearly 9x return on investment

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

Transformations By Olympic Angels
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Transformations By Olympic Angels

Board of directors
as of 5/20/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Ian Hanna

Altruist Partners

Term: 2020 -

Rachel Perkins

Cribl.io

Jan Whyte

Retired

Cynthia Becker

Retired

Dr. Lexa Murphy

Clinical Psychologist

Dr. Calah Tenney

Port Townsend Chiropractic

Morgan Hanna

Founder

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Not applicable
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 5/5/2021,

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

No data

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Gender identity
Not transgender (cisgender)

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data