PLATINUM2024

Rolling in Faith

Instilling Belonging, Purpose & Passion for People with Disabilities

Metropolis, IL   |  www.rollinginfaith.com

Mission

To provide fellowship & enrichment skills to people living with disabilities through events, camps, & other training all done in a faith-based setting.

Ruling year info

2020

Executive Director/Founder

Hadley Stephens

Main address

4484 Molly Ln

Metropolis, IL 62960 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

84-4582302

NTEE code info

Human Services - Multipurpose and Other N.E.C. (P99)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990-N.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Individuals with disabilities are a people group that are overlooked and undervalued in every single sector, by no fault of their own. However, this is not an indication that individuals with disabilities should be pitied. It is quite the opposite; individuals with disabilities are required to adapt and overcome and fit the molds of a society that doesn't have a place for them forming skills and attitudes that are invaluable. It is from this perspective that Rolling in Faith was born - a desire to serve persons with disability with the dignity and excellence that they deserve, to see and meet their unique challenges.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Children's Day Camp

This program is offered annually in the summertime to children with disabilities ages 2nd-6th grade. This is a three-day program from 9-12 giving children with disabilities the chance to experience a day camp setting. We are different than a traditional day camp in the way that we have a 1-1 ratio of campers and support volunteers. Giving the children an individualized experience.

Population(s) Served
Children

Rolling in Faith works to engage our participants beyond summer programming. We aim to do this through seasonal outreach events. These events are scheduled throughout the year and aim to create community, friendship, and support. These events are usually scheduled around holiday or community events. Participants, caregivers, and families are involved in this programming, and it gives the disability in Southern IL a way to create connections that are sometimes difficult to form. This program is for all ages.

Population(s) Served
Caregivers
Parents

Rolling in Faith is excited to offer a day-camp experience to adults with disabilities. The camp will be working in conjunction with an overarching program being offered in the month of June. The aim of this program is to help adults with disabilities have a special program just for them. Throughout the week we will be exploring opportunities of personal development and ways in which they can use their talents and skills in the community.

Population(s) Served

Summer Skills is a twice weekly program that will be offered throughout the month of June. The aim of this program is to help adults with disabilities develop necessary skills to be as autonomous as possible. We will look at different topics throughout the month and apply skills based on the topics, participant's individual goals, and areas that need improvement. The goal of this program is to encourage our friends with disabilities to expand their capabilities, which will hopefully lead to more opportunities and personal development.

This is the only program that is capped at 14-16 participants based on benchmarks of skill.

Population(s) Served
Christians
People with disabilities
Christians
People with disabilities
Adults
Christians
People with disabilities
Adults

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of participants who identify, manage, and appropriately express emotions and behaviors.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with disabilities, Christians

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

We consistently discuss the importance of emotions and behaviors. In the Fall semester of our Holland House program, participants took a look at different emotions and coping skills that correlate.

Number of clients who report feeling less isolated

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Caregivers, Families, People with disabilities

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

All of our programming promotes community and fostering belonging. Through our programs participants are able to develop friendships and interact with others who are going through similar challenges.

Number of clients who report a greater sense of purpose and improved overall wellness

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with disabilities, Christians

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Our Holland House participants reported through various methods a greater sense of purpose since attending the program. Participants are now able to learn new skills and be active in the community.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Rolling in Faith works alongside individuals with disabilities and their loved ones empowering them to be active members of their communities. We are dedicated to providing adults with intellectual disabilities with a community of support within our rural area. Services can be lacking in our geographic region; therefore, Rolling in Faith is dedicated to creating opportunities to be seen, known, and loved within the community through the following steps:
- Creating a college-like experience for individuals to attend and continue to develop important skills. We want our participants to be able to have as much autonomy over their lives as possible. We are actively working to develop a comprehensive content schedule that incorporates important events, skills, holidays, and other relevant information, giving students the opportunity to learn and become pillars in their community. We actively work with individuals in the community to expose our clients to experiences such as cooking, the arts, and entrepreneurship skills.
-While serving, the current adults in our region, we realize that we must always be looking towards the future. We aim to continue to grow the Holland House and Placemaker Party programs by continuing to increase programming by 10% each year.

For our Holland House program, we actively work with individuals in the community to expose our clients to experiences such as cooking, the arts, and entrepreneurship skills. We have developed strong partnerships with various organizations that assist us with creating programming that enriches the lives of our participants and exposes them to different activities. Some examples of this would be our partnership with PTA, a local organization that allows our clients to play and learn the game of tennis on a regular basis. Encouraging strategic thinking, communication and team building, and physical activity. We also partner with local individuals who teach our clients how to cook various meals on a weekly basis. We will continue to create community and build our program with the younger generation by creating relationships with young families impacted by disability in order to continue to engage participants community involvement throughout their lives to encourage future participation in our adult services. We want families with children who have a disability to know that we are able and willing to walk alongside them as they navigate the world with a disability. We are actively working to connect with local schools, educators, and transition specialists making them aware of our services, with the hope that when transition conversations arise, we would be invited to IEP meetings to share our expertise.


We are lucky to have staff and volunteer with various backgrounds that help us navigate and create the best opportunities for our clients. Being from a small town, the support and comradery has allowed us to assist in helping our clients make genuine connections in the community, which will in turn assist them in meeting their goals.

Since our conception in 2019, we have expanded our team to include two paid positions, meeting our year 1 strategic goal of developing our staff. We have also been able to increase our fundraising capacities raising double the amount of our first annual fundraiser, while continuing to partner with businesses, individuals, and private institutions allowing us to have a diverse income. We also continue to grow in attendance of participation and volunteers with 100% retention of clientele, while increasing by 10% by the upcoming fall semester.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We share the feedback we received with the people we serve, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time, It is difficult to get honest feedback from the people we serve

Financials

Rolling in Faith
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Rolling in Faith

Board of directors
as of 05/11/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Allen Rice

Heather Foss

Edward Jones

Clarissa Fox

Caledonia Christian Academy

Sarh May

City National Bank

Amy Land

Beyond Uganda

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Not applicable
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Not applicable

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 1/19/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Disability status
Person with a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability