Animal Humane Association of New Mexico, Inc.

aka Animal Humane New Mexico   |   Albuquerque, NM   |  www.AnimalHumaneNM.org

Mission

Our mission to support and improve the lives of New Mexico's cats and dogs through sheltering, adoptions, humane education, and veterinary services. We envision a society in which every animal is treated with respect and compassion.

Ruling year info

1971

Executive Director

Ms. Donna M. Stumpf

Main address

615 Virginia St. SE

Albuquerque, NM 87108 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

85-0207652

NTEE code info

Animal Protection and Welfare (includes Humane Societies and SPCAs) (D20)

Veterinary Services (D40)

Thrift Shops (P29)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Communities across the country have struggled with the issue of pet homelessness for decades. Sadly, New Mexico has one of the worst pet overpopulation problems in the country. But with the dedication of animal welfare professionals and through the generosity of donors, the euthanasia rate in our State is going down. Albuquerque is home to over 22% of New Mexicans living in poverty who struggle daily with financial capacity. In response, our Donor-subsidized Veterinary Clinic is the only full-service clinic in New Mexico exclusively serving low-income pet owners and homeless pets. In 2020, even amidst the pandemic, we provided over 3,100 medical services to pets of low-income families. Our shelter also transferred in over 1,100 at-risk pets into our care from overcrowded rural shelters statewide, most of whom require special treatment and care; provided over 70,000 pounds of dog & cat food through our Pet Food Bank; and helped 201 pets remain in loving homes through Safety Net.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Pet Food Bank

Animal Humane distributes over 100,000 pounds of pet food annually to needy pet owners and statewide rescue groups. We also partner with the City's Department of Senior Affairs to distribute pet food to homebound senior citizens. The program ensures that seniors can provide nutritious meals to their companion pets at no additional cost to their food budgets. Fixed-income seniors and military veterans receive unlimited assistance.

Population(s) Served
Unemployed people
Seniors

Free Behavior Helpline: Animal Humane offers the State’s only Behavior Helpline (505.938.7900) in an effort to empower pet owners with instructions to correct undesirable pet behavior and keep family pets in loving homes.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Animal Humane provides educational presentations to school and community groups on humane care of pets and the importance of altering your companion dog or cat.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Every year, thousands of dogs and cats in New Mexico need loving new homes. Your decision to adopt a homeless pet will save the life of your new companion, as well as the life of the pet we are able to care for next.
At Animal Humane, our experienced Adoptions Advisors will help you find the perfect pet for your family. Because we spend time evaluating and getting to know every pet, we can introduce you to the right dogs or cats that will be the best fit for you and your family.

Population(s) Served
Adults

We offer the state's only full-service clinic dedicated to serving only pets of low-income clients, homeless pets and feral felines.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Veterans

Our Thrift Shop generates over 12% of our annual operating budget. Dedicated volunteers and staff work together to keep gently used, saleable items flowing through the store.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Certified behavior specialists and world-renown instructors teach top-notch behavior & agility classes to the general public. Revenue helps our shelter operations. Our students travel from across New Mexico and Colorado to attend our courses.

Population(s) Served
Adults

This brand new facility, opened in May 2019, serves as a source of earned income for the shelter. With both half- and full-day play packages available for day care, and 25 boarding suites in 5 sizes, The Center at Animal Humane is the perfect staycation spot for dogs large & small.

Population(s) Served
Adults

This summer, unleash your child’s love of animals at Animal Humane’s Camp Humane! Camp Humane is Animal Humane’s animal-themed summer day camp for students age 5 – 13 years old. Our 4-acre Main Campus makes the perfect setting for animal-loving youth to learn more about caring and advocating for companion pets. Through animal-related learning activities and crafts, animal interactions, visits from special guests and field trips to other animal-welfare organizations, campers spend their week exploring topics such as how to care for and train companion animals, how to be responsible pet guardians, careers with animals, animal welfare, the challenges that animals face and how humans can help.

Each camp session is led by Animal Humane’s professional Humane Educators, with help from Junior Volunteer Counselors, trained students age 16-18 who wish to volunteer some of their summer hours to help homeless pets and their community.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Animal Humane is committed to saving more lives, and not just in Albuquerque where our offices and adoption sites are located. Project Fetch is a critical program serving shelters throughout New Mexico. Project Fetch is a flagship program that demonstrates the commitment to statewide animal welfare change communicated by our organization’s name, Animal Humane New Mexico. In many parts of our state, homeless pets reside in overcrowded and underfunded shelters that may be unable to rehome as many pets as they would like. Project Fetch works with these rescues and shelters to transfer pets to our facility, where we can give them a second chance at finding a forever home. In 2019, 1,645 pets made the life-saving journey from shelters in Roswell, Artesia, Torrance County, Gallup, Aztec, Chama, Santa Fe, Las Vegas, Espanola, Clovis, Artesia, Carrizozo, and Valencia County to name a few. We also regularly transfer in pets from our partners at the City of Albuquerque, Los Ranchos, and Rio Rancho.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Awards

Governor’s Award for Outstanding New Mexico Women for Peggy Wiegle, Executive Director 2009

New Mexico Commission on the Status of Women

Woman of Influence Award for Peggy Weigle, Executive Director 2009

New Mexico Business Weekly

Four Star Rating 2012

Charity Navigator

Top Not-for-Proft Ethics in Business Award 2012

Samaritian Counseling Center

Albuquerque Business First Nonprofit of the Year 2013

Albuquerque Business First

Readers’ Choice – Best Nonprofit 2014

Albuquerque Journal

Eagle Award for Renovations Under $8M 2014

Associated Builders & Contractors, New Mexico Chapter

Eagle Award in the Renovation & Remodel Category 2014

NAIOP

Best of the City – Best Place to Adopt a Pet 2014

Albuquerque The Magazine

Four Star Rating 2013

Charity Navigator

Four Star Rating 2015

Charity Navigator

Four Star Rating 2016

Charity Navigator

Four Star Rating 2017

Charity Navigator

Top Charity In New Mexico 2018

Business.org

Four Star Rating 2014

Charity Navigator

Best of the City – Best Place to Adopt a Pet 2020

Albuquerque The Magazine

Best of the City – Best Pet Rescue 2020

Albuquerque The Magazine

Reader's Choice- Pet Adoption 2020

Albuquerque Journal

Reader's Choice -Animal Rescue 2020

Albuquerque Journal

Reader's Choice- Charity Event 2020

Albuquerque Journal

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of animals spayed and neutered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Economically disadvantaged people, Veterans

Related Program

Donor-subsidized Veterinary Clinic

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Total number of spay/neuter surgeries performed; includes homeless + pets of low-income clients + feral felines + pets cared for by other groups in calendar year 2020, when spay/neuter was allowed.

Number of animal adoptions

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Adoptions

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of rehomed cats & dogs from our two adoptions locations in calendar year 2020.

Number of animals served by Veterinary Clinic (includes homeless + pets of low-income clients, and feral felines)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Seniors, Economically disadvantaged people, Veterans

Related Program

Donor-subsidized Veterinary Clinic

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Number of animals served by our Donor-subsidized Veterinary Clinic, includes homeless pets, pets of low-income clients, and feral felines in the calendar year.

Number of children K-12 and accompanying adults served by Humane Education

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Humane Education Outreach

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

In 2020, we provided Humane Education to 3,446 individuals through 3,313 contact hours. Most of this instruction was virtual in 2020.

Number of people served annually

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Annual people served in a calendar year, includes admissions/intakes, adoptions, pet health fairs; and clients of our low-income clinic, behavior helpline and pet food bank.

Live Release Rate

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

FY Live Release Rate (percentage) for the calendar year

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Animal Humane New Mexico's mission is to support and improve the lives of New Mexico's companion animals through sheltering, adoption, humane education, and quality veterinary services to homeless pets and pets of families in need.

Through our adoption and retention programs, Animal Humane has saved thousands of animals that otherwise would have remained as strays or been euthanized. Since 2010, Animal Humane has successfully adopted 100% of the healthy pets in our care. We continue to invest in facilities and programs to achieve a time when all adoptable animals can find loving new homes. In 2012, we initiated Project Humane, a $5.0 million dollar campus-wide renovation. The goal quite simply is to save more lives by improving the housing for every pet on campus, creating quarantine facilities so we may treat and save more animals and improving adoption and education facilities to better serve the public. In addition to our quality care of homeless and low-income client pets, we offer these resources to the public: Free Pet Food Bank, Free Behavior Helpline, Free dogs to a partner rescue pairing service dogs with Veterans, Free Financial & Pet Planning presentations, and K-12 educational outreach to nearly 6,000 children annually. Through Learn Humane, we introduce New Mexico's youth and adults to concepts, skills and resources that help humans build kind and compassionate relationships with their companion pets and one another.

Animal Humane New Mexico is the state's oldest and largest private animal welfare agency, employing over 100 passionate and devoted people. Our team is strengthened by nearly 500 volunteers and a strong Board of Directors. Animal Humane New Mexico's Circle of Care comprises more than 20 programs, services, and resources that allow us to achieve our mission. Included in this are: Learn Humane, Camp Humane, 505 Pit Crew, Campus Tours, Tran Humane, Volunteer Programs, Doggie Dash & Dawdle, Feline Fiesta, Community Partner Events & Pet Health Fairs, Animal Humane Thrift Shop, Social Media Network, Low-Income Donor-subsidized Veterinary Clinic, Two Adoptions Locations, Meet Your Match, Foster Care, Project Fetch - our statewide program to transfer at-risk cats & dogs into our care, Pet Food Bank, Free Behavior Helpline, and our New Mexico Humane Conference (NMHC).

Since 2005, Animal Humane has hosted NMHC, an annual multi-day educational event offering attendees from throughout the region an invaluable opportunity to learn new skills, discover the latest advancements in our industry, and network with like-minded professionals. Each year, the NMHC draws over 200 participants from New Mexico and surrounding states including animal welfare professionals, veterinarians, veterinary technicians, trainers and behavior professionals, representatives from numerous rescue groups, and animal welfare volunteers. In 2020, as part of our pandemic response, this conference was both remote and free to participants.

Since 2016, we've been working to establish an additional stream of earned revenue by building The Center at Animal Humane. The Center offers Behavior Training & Agility Classes intended to help owners develop deeper bonds with their dogs. Since behavior is the top reason that pets, dogs specifically, are surrendered our work at The Center is also helping to keep pets in homes and our of shelters. Our Doggie Day Care & Boarding services offer pet parents the ability to leave their beloved canine companions in a safe, clean and welcoming environment, all with the knowledge that their pet's needs are simultaneously helping other pets find homes.

We have completed Project Humane, our $5 million campus-wide renovation. As a result, we are saving more lives by reducing stress through improved housing for every pet in our care, treating illnesses in new quarantine facilities so we may save more animals, and better serving the public through an inviting, strategic space.

Our newest endeavor, The Center at Animal Humane extends our opportunities to reach pet lovers in the Albuquerque area and beyond. In 2016, The Center's website was launched and two new agility fields for group and private classes were opened. These classes have already resulted in earned revenue. At The Center, adopters may continue to instill the behavior lessons expertly taught by our Team during their pet's homeless residency in our care and pet owners with an enthusiasm for agility, behavior, competitive obedience and specialty classes may seek out talented instruction to further their training. Given that behavior is the No. 1 reason pets are surrendered to shelters, and only 8% of owners invest in training for their companion pets, Animal Humane aspires to become a household name not only for adoptions but for quality, affordable training, daycare & boarding that works to raise the quality of life for every member of the household while reducing the number of pets surrendered to shelters. Furthermore, The Center will allow Animal Humane to extend our capacity to build collaborative relationships with other civic groups, nonprofits and municipal shelters around the state. By shifting our public training and behavior classes from our Main Campus to The Center, we open up valuable space for shelter behavior staff to work with and identify animals in our homeless population that are a matched fit for our partner organizations including Paws & Stripes and The Warm Hearts Network.

Additionally, the revenue generated through The Center will allow us to continue working with municipal shelters and nonprofits across the state and will help support our spay/neuter efforts that has resulted in over 58,000 sterilizations and correlated with a 51% reduction of strays and a 27% reduction in pet surrenders since 2007. Combined with the Albuquerque Animal Welfare Department's reduction of 49% fewer intakes and 135,000 spay/neuter surgeries since 2005, our partnership efforts are leading the way to a brighter future for each pet & person served as well as for Albuquerque's economic outlook for the cost of animal welfare. We are in the final stages of fundraising for this campaign and we look forward to partnering with individuals dedicated to another half-century of success at Animal Humane.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

Financials

Animal Humane Association of New Mexico, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Animal Humane Association of New Mexico, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 10/15/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Ryan Newhall

Garcia Automotive Group

Term: 2020 - 2022

Ryan Newhall

Garcia Automotive Group

Cindy Edwards

PNM Resources

Rebecca Mount, DVM, DACVD

Dermatology for Animals

Phil Prevender

Prevender Financial Services

Kristen Kennedy

Kennedy Financial Network

Donna Stumpf

Animal Humane New Mexico

Linda Sedillo Gonzales

CliftonLarsonAllen LLP

Tracy Jenks, Esq.

Community Volunteer

Ron Burstein

Studio Southwest Architects, Inc.

Joshua Howe

Bank of Albuquerque

Peggy Wright

Community Volunteer

James (Jim) Reist

Smidt, Reist & Keleher, P.C.

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/22/2021,

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Decline to state
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 02/22/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Policies and processes
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.